Writing the Civil War

Writing the Civil War

Author: James M. McPherson

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 1643362216

Page: 368

View: 890

No event has transformed the United States more fundamentally—or been studied more exhaustively—than the Civil War. In Writing the Civil War, fourteen distinguished historians present a wide-ranging examination of the vast effort to chronicle the conflict—an undertaking that began with the remembrances of Civil War veterans and has become an increasingly prolific field of scholarship. Covering topics from battlefield operations to the impact of race and gender, this volume is an informative guide through the labyrinth of Civil War literature. The contributors provide authoritative and interpretive evaluations of the study and explication of the struggle that has been called the American Iliad.

After 69 CE Writing Civil War in Flavian Rome

This book provides an important new chapter in the study of Roman civil war literature by investigating the multi-faceted Flavian response to this persistent and prominent theme.

After 69 CE   Writing Civil War in Flavian Rome

Author: Lauren Donovan Ginsberg

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110585847

Page: 499

View: 896

The fall of Nero and the civil wars of 69 CE ushered in an era scarred by the recent conflicts; Flavian literature also inherited a rich tradition of narrating nefas from its predecessors who had confronted and commemorated the traumas of Pharsalus and Actium. Despite the present surge of scholarly interest in both Flavian literary studies and Roman civil war literature, however, the Flavian contribution to Rome’s literature of bellum ciuile remains understudied. This volume shines a spotlight on these neglected voices. In the wake of 69 CE, writing civil war became an inescapable project for Flavian Rome: from Statius’s fraternas acies and Silius’s suicidal Saguntines to the internecine narratives detailed in Josephus’s Bellum Iudaicum and woven into Frontinus’s exempla, Flavian authors’ preoccupation with civil war transcends genre and subject matter. This book provides an important new chapter in the study of Roman civil war literature by investigating the multi-faceted Flavian response to this persistent and prominent theme.

Spanish Front

The publication of this book is timed to coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War.

Spanish Front

Author: Valentine Cunningham

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Page: 388

View: 319

The Spanish Civil War was the most momentous political and cultural flashpoint of the 1930s. This anthology presents a vivid, moving, and often surprising, cross-section of the writing it generated, Right-wing as well as Left.

Civil War Writing

Overall, the essays in Civil War Writing underscore how participants employed various literary forms to record, describe, and explain aspects and episodes of a conflict that assumed proportions none of them imagined possible at the outset.

Civil War Writing

Author: Stephen Cushman

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807170240

Page: 312

View: 398

Civil War Writing is a collection of new essays that focus on the most significant writing about the American Civil War by participants who lived through it, whether as civilians or combatants, southerners or northerners, women or men, blacks or whites. Collectively, as contributors show, these writings have sustained their influence over generations and include histories, memoirs, journals, novels, and one literary falsehood posing as an autobiographical narrative. Several of the works, such as William Tecumseh Sherman’s memoirs or Mary Chesnut’s diary, are familiar to scholars, but other accounts, including Charlotte Forten’s diary and Loreta Velasquez’s memoir, offer new material to even the most omnivorous Civil War reader. In all cases, a deeper look at these writings reveals why they continue to resonate with audiences more than 150 years after the end of the conflict. As supporting evidence for historical and biographical narratives and as deliberately designed communications, the writings discussed in this collection demonstrate considerable value. Whether exploring the differences among drafts and editions, listening closely to fluctuations in tone or voice, or tracing responses in private correspondence or published reviews, the essayists examine how authors wrote to different audiences and out of different motives, creating a complex literary record that offers rich potential for continuing evaluation of the country’s greatest national trauma. Overall, the essays in Civil War Writing underscore how participants employed various literary forms to record, describe, and explain aspects and episodes of a conflict that assumed proportions none of them imagined possible at the outset.

Spanish Women Writers and Spain s Civil War

The authors represented in this collection reflect a wide range of political positions.

Spanish Women Writers and Spain s Civil War

Author: Maryellen Bieder

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1134777167

Page: 250

View: 788

The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) pitted conservative forces including the army, the Church, the Falange (fascist party), landowners, and industrial capitalists against the Republic, installed in 1931 and supported by intellectuals, the petite bourgeoisie, many campesinos (farm laborers), and the urban proletariat. Provoking heated passions on both sides, the Civil War soon became an international phenomenon that inspired a number of literary works reflecting the impact of the war on foreign and national writers. While the literature of the period has been the subject of scholarship, women's literary production has not been studied as a body of work in the same way that literature by men has been, and its unique features have not been examined. Addressing this lacuna in literary studies, this volume provides fresh perspectives on well-known women writers, as well as less studied ones, whose works take the Spanish Civil War as a theme. The authors represented in this collection reflect a wide range of political positions. Writers such as Maria Zambrano, Mercè Rodoreda, and Josefina Aldecoa were clearly aligned with the Republic, whereas others, including Mercedes Salisachs and Liberata Masoliver, sympathized with the Nationalists. Most, however, are situated in a more ambiguous political space, although the ethics and character portraits that emerge in their works might suggest Republican sympathies. Taken together, the essays are an important contribution to scholarship on literature inspired by this pivotal point in Spanish history.

Sons of Arthur Children of Lincoln

In the first study of its kind, Jerry Hunter sifts through this huge archive of letters, diaries, poetry, and prose from soldiers, civilians, and professional writers to give a fascinating account of Welsh-American reactions to the war and ...

Sons of Arthur  Children of Lincoln

Author: Jerry Hunter

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780708320198

Page: 498

View: 422

Nearly ten thousand pages of writing in Welsh stemming from the American Civil War has survived—offering contemporary readers a surprising opportunity to look at the war from an entirely new perspective. In the first study of its kind, Jerry Hunter sifts through this huge archive of letters, diaries, poetry, and prose from soldiers, civilians, and professional writers to give a fascinating account of Welsh-American reactions to the war and its context. His examination of issues such as the Welsh community's support for abolition and the war's effects on notions of Welsh-American identity will captivate historians, literary scholars, and Civil War buffs alike.

Mosaic Fictions

Mosaic Fictions reveals the tensions between national and global affiliations in Spanish Civil War literature, highlighting writers such as Leonard Cohen, Dorothy Livesay, and Mordecai Richler.

Mosaic Fictions

Author: Emily Robins Sharpe

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1487501420

Page: 240

View: 962

Mosaic Fictions reveals the tensions between national and global affiliations in Spanish Civil War literature, highlighting writers such as Leonard Cohen, Dorothy Livesay, and Mordecai Richler.

Haiti s Paper War

Turns to the written record to re-examine the building blocks of a nation Picking up where most historians conclude, Chelsea Stieber explores the critical internal challenge to Haiti’s post-independence sovereignty: a civil war between ...

Haiti s Paper War

Author: Chelsea Stieber

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479802174

Page:

View: 689

Turns to the written record to re-examine the building blocks of a nation Picking up where most historians conclude, Chelsea Stieber explores the critical internal challenge to Haiti’s post-independence sovereignty: a civil war between monarchy and republic. What transpired was a war of swords and of pens, waged in newspapers and periodicals, in literature, broadsheets, and fliers. In her analysis of Haitian writing that followed independence, Stieber composes a new literary history of Haiti, that challenges our interpretations of both freedom struggles and the postcolonial. By examining internal dissent during the revolution, Stieber reveals that the very concept of freedom was itself hotly contested in the public sphere, and it was this inherent tension that became the central battleground for the guerre de plume—the paper war—that vied to shape public sentiment and the very idea of Haiti. Stieber’s reading of post-independence Haitian writing reveals key insights into the nature of literature, its relation to freedom and politics, and how fraught and politically loaded the concepts of “literature” and “civilization” really are. The competing ideas of liberté, writing, and civilization at work within postcolonial Haiti have consequences for the way we think about Haiti’s role—as an idea and a discursive interlocutor—in the elaboration of black radicalism and black Atlantic, anticolonial, and decolonial thought. In so doing, Stieber reorders our previously homogeneous view of Haiti, teasing out warring conceptions of the new nation that continued to play out deep into the twentieth century.

The American Civil War

This collection makes a perfect addition to any course on Civil War history or literature as well as courses on popular memory.

The American Civil War

Author: Ian Frederick Finseth

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 0415977444

Page: 629

View: 818

This anthology brings together a wide variety of both well-known and more obscure writing from and about the Civil War, along with supplementary appendices to facilitate its use in courses. The selections include short fiction, poetry, public addresses, diary entries, song lyrics, and essays from such figures as Walt Whitman, Ambrose Bierce, Stephen Crane, and Louisa May Alcott, as well as Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Jefferson Davis, and Ulysses S. Grant. The writing not only includes those directly involved in the war, but also those writing about the war afterward, to include the perspective of historical memory. This collection makes a perfect addition to any course on Civil War history or literature as well as courses on popular memory.

The Political Work of Northern Women Writers and the Civil War 1850 1872

Explores the lives and works of nine Northern women who wrote during the Civil War period, examining the ways in which they engaged in the national debates of the time.

The Political Work of Northern Women Writers and the Civil War  1850 1872

Author: Lyde Cullen Sizer

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807848852

Page: 348

View: 617

This study explores the lives of nine Northern American female writers of the Civil War period. It examines how, through their writing, they engaged in the national debates of the time. The author shows how they and others used their writing to make sense of topics like war, womanhood and slavery.

Writing with Scissors

This book explains how their scrapbooks underlie our present-day ways of thinking about information, news, and what we do with it.

Writing with Scissors

Author: Ellen Gruber Garvey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199986355

Page: 320

View: 781

Men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks-the ancestors of Google and blogging. From Abraham Lincoln to Susan B. Anthony, African American janitors to farmwomen, abolitionists to Confederates, people cut out and pasted down their reading. Writing with Scissors opens a new window into the feelings and thoughts of ordinary and extraordinary Americans. Like us, nineteenth-century readers spoke back to the media, and treasured what mattered to them. In this groundbreaking book, Ellen Gruber Garvey reveals a previously unexplored layer of American popular culture, where the proliferating cheap press touched the lives of activists and mourning parents, and all who yearned for a place in history. Scrapbook makers documented their feelings about momentous public events such as living through the Civil War, mediated through the newspapers. African Americans and women's rights activists collected, concentrated, and critiqued accounts from a press that they did not control to create "unwritten histories" in books they wrote with scissors. Whether scrapbook makers pasted their clippings into blank books, sermon collections, or the pre-gummed scrapbook that Mark Twain invented, they claimed ownership of their reading. They created their own democratic archives. Writing with Scissors argues that people have long had a strong personal relationship to media. Like newspaper editors who enthusiastically "scissorized" and reprinted attractive items from other newspapers, scrapbook makers passed their reading along to family and community. This book explains how their scrapbooks underlie our present-day ways of thinking about information, news, and what we do with it.

Black Writers and the American Civil War

INTRODUCTION While there is a general awareness of the fact that the slavery
question was central to the causes of the Civil War , many historians , amateur
and professional , have sought more elevated , more nuanced reasons for the ...

Black Writers and the American Civil War

Author: Richard A. Long

Publisher: Book Sales

ISBN:

Page: 370

View: 196

Includes excerpts from: The Negro in the American rebellion / W.W. Brown -- A history of the Negro troops in the war of the rebellion / G.W. Williams -- The Black phalanx / J.T. Wilson -- Reminiscences of my life in camp / S.K. Taylor -- Journal / C. Forten -- Life and public services of Martin R. Delaney / F.A. Rollin -- From the Virginia plantation to the national capitol / J.M. Langston -- [Writings] / F. Douglass.

Civil War History

What is needed most of all is a Civil War historiography - some conscious thought
and writing , that is , about the writing of military history . We need more historians
writing about other historians . Not merely reviews , but essays and articles on ...

Civil War History

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 244

Literature and the English Civil War

This book charts the relationship between literary texts and their historical context from 1640-1660.

Literature and the English Civil War

Author: Thomas Healy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521370825

Page: 268

View: 992

This book charts the relationship between literary texts and their historical context from 1640-1660. Essays in the volume focus on issues of ideology and genre; the politics of the masque; lyric and devotional poetry; women's writings; attitudes towards Ireland; colonialism; madness and division; and individual writers such as Hobbes, Marvell and Milton.

Civil War Prisons

The remaining articles treat conditions in four Union prisons: Fort Warren in Boston harb∨ Rock Island, Illinois; Elmira, New York; and Johnson's Island on Lake Erie....in addition to some examples of sparkling and vivid prose, this ...

Civil War Prisons

Author: William Best Hesseltine

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 9780873381291

Page: 123

View: 995

First published in 1962 as a special edition of Civil War History journal, Civil War Prisons remains the standard on the topic. Editor Hesseltine tackles the historiography of northern and southern prisons during the American Civil War. He attempts to bring closure to the legendary northern myth that the Southern government did its best to "exterminate" Union prisoners by calling the effective northern war propaganda a wartime "psychosis." Furthermore, the author offers his analysis over the much debated prisoner exchange system, and comes down hard on the North, especially its government and General Ulysses S. Grant, for their questionable approach to this issue. For all the serious scholarship and popular writing devoted to the American Civil War, the topic of prisoner-of-war camps, more than any other, retains the feeling of horror and passion that characterized the war years themselves, "Men held captive under such circumstances, guilty of no offense other than the deplorable misfortune of having been captured by the enemy, suffer tremendous psychological punishment as well as physical hardship. Monotony, estrangement and fear, along with privation and often brutality, combine to create nearly as wretched a quality of human life as is imaginable. The sufferings of Civil War prisoners (are) documented in this re-issue of an early number of the journal Civil War History ....Recounted there....are prisoner experiences in four Confederate installations: Andersonville, Georgia; Libby in Richmond, Virginia; Cahaba, Alabama; and Charleston, South Carolina. The remaining articles treat conditions in four Union prisons: Fort Warren in Boston harb∨ Rock Island, Illinois; Elmira, New York; and Johnson's Island on Lake Erie....in addition to some examples of sparkling and vivid prose, this volume contains a number of excellent photographs as well as an introduction by the late William B. Hesseltine...."--Kenneth B. Shover, The Historian

Jews and the Civil War

At least 8,000 Jewish soldiers fought for the Union and Confederacy during the Civil War. A few served together in Jewish companies while most fought alongside Christian comrades.

Jews and the Civil War

Author: Jonathan D. Sarna

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814708590

Page: 445

View: 688

At least 8,000 Jewish soldiers fought for the Union and Confederacy during the Civil War. A few served together in Jewish companies while most fought alongside Christian comrades. Yet even as they stood “shoulder-to-shoulder” on the front lines, they encountered unique challenges. In Jews and the Civil War, Jonathan D. Sarna and Adam Mendelsohn assemble for the first time the foremost scholarship on Jews and the Civil War, little known even to specialists in the field. These accessible and far-ranging essays from top scholars are grouped into seven thematic sections—Jews and Slavery, Jews and Abolition, Rabbis and the March to War, Jewish Soldiers during the Civil War, The Home Front, Jews as a Class, and Aftermath—each with an introduction by the editors. Together they reappraise the impact of the war on Jews in the North and the South, offering a rich and fascinating portrait of the experience of Jewish soldiers and civilians from the home front to the battle front.