What Is a Jewish Joke

Engaging and insightful history and analysis, generously illustrated with samples of the "genre." Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

What Is a Jewish Joke

Author: Henry Eilbirt

Publisher: Jason Aronson Incorporated

ISBN: 9780876682173

Page: 304

View: 380

The author describes the historical development of Jewish humor and analyzes what makes a joke Jewish.

The Genius of the Jewish Joke

The book makes a "radical" suggestion about the origin of Jewish humor—namely, that Sarah and Abraham's relation to God, and the name of their son Isaac (which, in Hebrew, means laughter), recognizes a special affinity in Jews for humor.

The Genius of the Jewish Joke

Author: Arthur Asa Berger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351482254

Page: 218

View: 318

The Genius of the Jewish Joke focuses on what is distinctive and unusual about Jewish jokes and Jewish humor. Jewish humor is humor by Jews and about Jews, in whatever medium this humor is found. Jokes are defined as short stories, meant to amuse, with a punch line, though Jewish humor exists in many other forms—riddles, comic definitions, parodies—as well. The book makes a "radical" suggestion about the origin of Jewish humor—namely, that Sarah and Abraham's relation to God, and the name of their son Isaac (which, in Hebrew, means laughter), recognizes a special affinity in Jews for humor. Abraham does not sacrifice Isaac (humor) and, thus, humor and the Jews are linked early in Jewish history. Berger discusses techniques of humor and how they can be used to analyze jokes. He also compares "Old World Jewish Humor"—the humor of the shtetl, with its fabulous schlemiels, schlimazels, schnorrers, and other characters—and "New World Humor"—the humor of Jewish doctors, lawyers, accountants, and other professional types living mostly in the suburbs nowadays. Jewish humor is contrasted with other forms of ethnic humor, such as Polish jokes and Italian American jokes. This humor, in addition to providing pleasure, reveals a great deal about Jewish character and culture and, in addition, the human condition. Now available with a new introduction by the author, The Genius of the Jewish Joke is an entertaining and informative inquiry into Jewish humor that explores its distinctiveness, its unique spirit, and its role in Jewish identity.

Jewish Humor

This book details the evolution of Jewish humour, highlighting its long history from the period of the Bible to the present day, and includes a wide spectrum of styles that are expressed in various works and fields, including the Bible, the ...

Jewish Humor

Author: Arie Sover

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1527568083

Page: 339

View: 806

This book details the evolution of Jewish humour, highlighting its long history from the period of the Bible to the present day, and includes a wide spectrum of styles that are expressed in various works and fields, including the Bible, the Talmud, poetry, literature, folklore, jokes, movies, and television series. It focuses upon three socio-geographic regions where the majority of Jewish people lived during the 18th to 21st centuries and where Jewish humor was created, developed and thrived: Eastern Europe, the United States and Israel. The text is a complicated mosaic based on three central components of Jewish life: historical experience, survival, and wisdom. It shows that one cannot understand Jewish humor without referring to the various factors which led the Jewish people to create their unusual sense of humor.

Jewish Humor

Each chapter in this volume paves the way for understanding the many facets of Jewish humor. This book will be immensely enjoyable and informative for sociologists, psychologists, and scholars of Judaic studies.

Jewish Humor

Author: Avner Ziv

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351510932

Page: 240

View: 293

The thirteen chapters in this book are derived from the First International Conference on Jewish Humor held at Tel-Aviv University. The authors are scientists from the areas of literature, linguistics, sociology, psychology, history, communications, the theater, and Jewish studies. They all try to understand different aspects of Jewish humor, and they evoke associations, of a local-logical nature, with Jewish tradition. This compilation reflects the first interdisciplinary approach to Jewish humor. The chapters are arranged in four parts. The first section relates to humor as a way of coping with Jewish identity. Joseph Dorinson's chapter underscores the dilemma facing Jewish comedians in the United States. These comics try to assimilate into American culture, but without giving up their Jewish identity. The second section of the book deals with a central function of humor--aggression. Christie Davies makes a clear distinction between jokes that present the Jew as a victim of anti-Semitic attacks and those in which the approach is not aggressive. The third part focuses on humor in the Jewish tradition. Lawrence E. Mintz writes about jokes involving Jewish and Christian clergymen. The last part of the book deals with humor in Israel. David Alexander talks about the development of satire in Israel. Other chapters and contributors include: -Psycho-Social Aspects of Jewish Humor in Israel and in the Diaspora- by Avner Ziv; -Humor and Sexism: The Case of the Jewish Joke- by Esther Fuchs; -Halachic Issues as Satirical Elements in Nineteenth Century Hebrew Literature- by Yehuda Friedlander; -Do Jews in Israel still laugh at themselves?- by O. Nevo; and -Political Caricature as a Reflection of Israel's Development- by Kariel Gardosh. Each chapter in this volume paves the way for understanding the many facets of Jewish humor. This book will be immensely enjoyable and informative for sociologists, psychologists, and scholars of Judaic studies.

Alan King s Great Jewish Joke Book

Presents a collection of Jewish jokes unders such categories as the Jewish psyche, bar/bas mitzvahs, Jewish boys and men, Jewish mothers, rabbis, and observance.

Alan King s Great Jewish Joke Book

Author: Alan King

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 9780609609248

Page: 175

View: 301

Presents a collection of Jewish jokes unders such categories as the Jewish psyche, bar/bas mitzvahs, Jewish boys and men, Jewish mothers, rabbis, and observance.

Jewish Wry

Jewish Wry examines the development of Jewish humor in a series of essays on topics that range from Sholom Aleichem's humor to Jewish comediennes through to the humor of Philip Roth.

Jewish Wry

Author: Sarah Blacher Cohen

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814323663

Page: 244

View: 227

Jewish Wry examines the development of Jewish humor in a series of essays on topics that range from Sholom Aleichem's humor to Jewish comediennes through to the humor of Philip Roth.

A Club of Their Own

"The Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem."

A Club of Their Own

Author: Professor of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry Head of the School of History Faculty of the Humanities Eli Lederhendler

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190646128

Page: 336

View: 419

Volume XXIX of Studies in Contemporary Jewry takes its title from a joke by Groucho Marx: "I don't want to belong to any club that will accept me as a member." The line encapsulates one of the most important characteristics of Jewish humor: the desire to buffer oneself from potentially unsafe or awkward situations, and thus to achieve social and emotional freedom. By studying the history and development of Jewish humor, the essays in this volume not only provide nuanced accounts of how Jewish humor can be described but also make a case for the importance of humor in studying any culture. A recent survey showed that about four in ten American Jews felt that "having a good sense of humor" was "an essential part of what being Jewish means to them," on a par with or exceeding caring for Israel, observing Jewish law, and eating traditional foods. As these essays show, Jewish humor has served many functions as a form of "insider" speech. It has been used to ridicule; to unite people in the face of their enemies; to challenge authority; to deride politics and politicians; in America, to ridicule conspicuous consumption; in Israel, to contrast expectations of political normalcy and bitter reality. However, much of contemporary Jewish humor is designed not only or even primarily as insider speech. Rather, it rewards all those who get the punch line. A Club of Their Own moves beyond general theorizing about the nature of Jewish humor by serving a smorgasbord of finely grained, historically situated, and contextualized interdisciplinary studies of humor and its consumption in Jewish life in the modern world.

Old Jews Telling Jokes

For five thousand years, God’s chosen people have cornered the market on knee-slappers, zingers, and knock-knock jokes. Now Old Jews Telling Jokes mines mothers, fathers, bubbies, and zaydes for comic gelt.

Old Jews Telling Jokes

Author: Sam Hoffman

Publisher: Villard

ISBN: 0345522451

Page: 256

View: 717

A grasshopper walked into a bar and ordered a drink. The bartender looked at him and said, “You know we have a drink named after you?” The grasshopper replied, “You have a drink named Stanley?” Schtick happens. For five thousand years, God’s chosen people have cornered the market on knee-slappers, zingers, and knock-knock jokes. Now Old Jews Telling Jokes mines mothers, fathers, bubbies, and zaydes for comic gelt. What we get are jokes that are funnier than a pie in the punim: Abie and Becky jokes; hilarious rabbi, doctor, and mohel tales; and those bits just for Mom (Q: What’s the difference between a Jewish mother and a Rottweiler? A: Eventually a Rottweiler will let go!). Some are just naughty and some are downright bawdy—but either way you’ll laugh till you plotz. With Borscht Belt gags from Brooklyn to Bel Air to Boca, Old Jews Telling Jokes is like chicken soup for your funny bone. I mean, would it kill you to laugh a little?

Oy

He owns and runs a website devoted to the Jewish Joke that has over 2000 jokes on it. His previous title, The Ultimate Book of Jewish Jokes was a huge seller worldwide.

Oy

Author: David Minkoff

Publisher: Aurum

ISBN: 9781906217624

Page: 480

View: 572

Q: What does Sadie do with her headache each morning? A: She sends him to work In this laugh-out-loud book, David Minkoff, collector of Jewish jokes, shares with us the funniest, silliest and unmistakably Jewish jokes from his vast collection. Brought up in a Jewish family, where joke-telling was a social activity, the author is well placed to take a sideways look at Jewish life and culture. All aspects of everyday life is covered, with chapters on life, death, matters of faith, people and professions, medicine, romance and families, and more. From marriage brokers (shadchen) to bar mitzvahs and from schmucks and gossips (yentas), there is a recognisable character on every page, and a rather handy glossary of terms at the back! There is even a special child-friendly section and a humour test for couples. Contemporary and traditional by turns, Oy! The Great Jewish Joke Book is great fun for all the family to enjoy, from couples to grandmothers. And lastly: Q: How do you prevent your bagels being stolen? A: Put lox on them. Brought up in a Jewish household where joke-telling is a social activity, the author has been collecting jokes for a long time. He owns and runs a website devoted to the Jewish Joke that has over 2000 jokes on it. His previous title, The Ultimate Book of Jewish Jokes was a huge seller worldwide.

The Ultimate Jewish Joke Book

The Ultimate Jewish Joke Book

Author: Larry Wilde

Publisher: Bantam Books

ISBN: 9780553262278

Page: 185

View: 355

Gathers jokes about hospitals, doctors, vacationers, bets, marriage, actors, psychiatrists, teachers, businessmen, spoiled young women, grandparents, and children

The Jewish Joke

With jokes from Woody Allen, Lena Dunham and Jerry Seinfeld, as well as Freud and Marx (Groucho mostly), this is both a compendium and a commentary, light-hearted and deeply insightful.

The Jewish Joke

Author: Devorah Baum

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN: 1782831932

Page: 128

View: 201

The Jewish joke is as old as Abraham, and like the Jews themselves it has wandered over the world, learned countless new languages, worked with a range of different materials, been performed in front of some pretty hostile crowds, but still retained its own distinctive identity. So what is it that animates the Jewish joke? Why are Jews so often thought of as 'funny'? And how old can a joke get? The Jewish Joke is a brilliant - and very funny - riff on Jewish jokes, about what marks them apart from other jokes, why they are important to Jewish identity and how they work. Ranging from self-deprecation to anti-Semitism, politics to sex, it looks at the past of Jewish joking and asks whether the Jewish joke has a future. With jokes from Woody Allen, Lena Dunham and Jerry Seinfeld, as well as Freud and Marx (Groucho mostly), this is both a compendium and a commentary, light-hearted and deeply insightful.

At Wit s End

The first in-depth study to explore the Jewish joke as a crucial rhetorical figure in larger cultural debates in Germany, author Louis Kaplan presents an engrossing and lucid work of scholarship that examines how “der jüdische Witz” ...

At Wit s End

Author: Louis Kaplan

Publisher: Fordham University Press

ISBN: 0823287572

Page: 352

View: 657

A scholarly and thought-provoking work that places Jewish humor at the center of a discourse about Jewish and German relations through most of the twentieth century. At Wit’s End explores the fascinating discourse on Jewish wit in the twentieth century when the Jewish joke became the subject of serious humanistic inquiry and inserted itself into the cultural and political debates among Germans and Jews against the ideologically charged backdrop of anti-Semitism, the Jewish question, and the Holocaust. The first in-depth study to explore the Jewish joke as a crucial rhetorical figure in larger cultural debates in Germany, author Louis Kaplan presents an engrossing and lucid work of scholarship that examines how “der jüdische Witz” (referring to both Jewish wit and jokes) was utilized differently in a number of texts, from the Weimar Republic to the rise of National Socialism, and how it was re-introduced into the public sphere after the Holocaust with the controversial publication of Salcia Landmann’s collection of Jewish jokes in the reparations era (Wiedergutmachung). Kaplan reviews the claims made about the Jewish joke and its provocative laughter by notable writers from a variety of ideological perspectives, demonstrating how their reflections on this complex cultural trope enable a better understanding of German–Jewish intercultural relations and their eventual breakdown in the Third Reich. He also illustrates how selfcritical and self-ironic Jewish Witz maintained a fraught and ambivalent relationship with anti-Semitism. In reviewing this critical and traumatic moment in modern German–Jewish history through the deadly discourse on the Jewish joke, At Wit’s End includes chapters on the virulent Austrian anti-Semitic racial theorist Arthur Trebitsch, the Nazi racial propagandist Siegfried Kadner, the German Marxist cultural historian Eduard Fuchs, the Jewish diasporic historian Erich Kahler, and the Jewish cabaret impresario Kurt Robitschek, among others. Shedding new light on anti-Semitism and on the Jewish question leading up to the Holocaust, At Wit’s End provides readers with a unique perspective by which to gain important insights about this crucial historical period that reverberates into the present day, when potentially offensive humor coupled with a toxic political climate and xenophobia can have deadly consequences.

Semites and Stereotypes

This interdisciplinary collection of essays assesses Jewish humor as a subject of serious scholarly inquiry.

Semites and Stereotypes

Author: Avner Ziv

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313261350

Page: 197

View: 919

This interdisciplinary collection of essays assesses Jewish humor as a subject of serious scholarly inquiry. Scholars from England, France, the United States, Denmark, Israel, and Australia explore Jewish humor from a variety of perspectives, including anthropology, literature, psychology, sociology, and religion. Individual essays focus on linkages with language, religion, and historical traditions; study characteristics such as gallows humor, self-disparagement, and stereotyping; analyze distinctions between humor in Israel and in the diaspora; and discuss the contributions of Jewish humorists and comic performers and Jewish theorists of humor.

Life is Like a Glass of Tea

The first book on Jewish humor in which individual jokes are singled out for comprehensive study, Life is Like a Glass of Tea devotes a chapter to each of eight major jokes, tracing its history and variants—and looking closely at the ways ...

Life is Like a Glass of Tea

Author: Richard Raskin

Publisher: Quid Pro Books

ISBN: 1610273214

Page: 286

View: 969

The first book on Jewish humor in which individual jokes are singled out for comprehensive study, Life is Like a Glass of Tea devotes a chapter to each of eight major jokes, tracing its history and variants—and looking closely at the ways in which the comic behavior enacted in the punchline can be interpreted. One of the unique properties of classic Jewish jokes is their openness to radically different interpretive options (having nothing to do with wordplay or double entendre). This openness to alternate interpretations—never before discussed in the literature on Jewish humor—gives classic Jewish jokes their special flavor, as they leave us wondering which of several possible attitudes we are expected to hold toward the comic figure. An additional chapter is devoted to the ways in which Jewish jokes tend to evolve over time and across language and cultural barriers. Throughout the book, in fact, one can see the processes that Jewish jokes undergo over decades as their comic potential is unfolded in successive stages, and when they are transplanted from European to American soil. Now in its Second Edition, this expanded version adds two new chapters and new introductory material. It includes a 2015 Foreword by Marc Galanter, who notes that the author “is concerned not only with what makes jokes funny but with what makes some of them profound. His imaginative response to this puzzle makes this little book a distinctive and engaging contribution to the literature on Jewish jokes and on jokes generally.” It will appeal to the general reader, as well as to readers especially interested in Jewish culture, the psychology of humor, religion, ethnography, and folklore. “Richard Raskin’s book on Jewish humor was the most original and useful I found in years of research on the topic. I’m delighted to see it back in print—and with added chapters!” — Ruth Wisse Professor Emerita, Yiddish and Comparative Literature, Harvard University Author, No Joke: Making Jewish Humor (2013) “A fascinating book that explores the richness of Jewish humor. Raskin offers a thought-provoking analysis of what makes Jewish humor special. Raskin merges an understanding of Jewish culture, fresh psychological insights, and a sophisticated reading of jokes and their evolution to create a gem of a book. However, it is not just an outstanding book on Jewish humor. It is an outstanding book on humor. Period. After reading it, you won’t laugh the same way again.” — Dov Cohen Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Illinois Co-editor, Handbook of Cultural Psychology (2007)

The Case of the Sexy Jewess

Bringing sexiness together with race, gender, and class, The Case of the Sexy Jewess looks at embodied joke-work that is most often, but not always meant to be funny.

The Case of the Sexy Jewess

Author: Hannah Schwadron

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190624191

Page: 216

View: 110

Amidst the growing forums of kinky Jews, orthodox drag queens, and Jewish geisha girls, we find today's sexy Jewess in a host of reflexive plays with sexed-up self-display. A social phantasm with real legs, she moves boldly between neo-burlesque striptease, comedy television, ballet movies, and progressive porn to construct the 21st Century Jewish American woman through charisma and comic craft, in-your-face antics, and offensive charm. Her image redresses longstanding stereotypes of the hag, the Jewish mother, and Jewish American princess that have demeaned the Jewish woman as overly demanding, inappropriate, and unattractive across the 20th century, even as Jews assimilated into the American mainstream. But why does "sexy" work to update tropes of the Jewish woman? And how does sex link to humor in order for this update to work? Entangling questions of sexiness to race, gender, and class, The Case of the Sexy Jewess frames an embodied joke-work genre that is most often, but not always meant to be funny. In a contemporary period after the thrusts of assimilation and women's liberation movements, performances usher in new versions of old scripts with ranging consequences. At the core is the recuperative performance of identity through impersonation, and the question of its radical or conservative potential. Appropriating, re-appropriating, and mis-appropriating identity material within and beyond their midst, Sexy Jewess artists play up the failed logic of representation by mocking identity categories altogether. They act as comic chameleons, morphing between margin and center in countless number of charged caricatures. Embodying ethnic and gender positions as always already on the edge while ever more in the middle, contemporary Jewish female performers extend a comic tradition in new contexts, mobilizing progressive discourses from positions of newfound race and gender privilege.

Humor in der arabischen Kultur

The joke in rabbinic literature Home - born or Diaspora humor ? by Tal Ilan It is a
well - known truism that the Jews have a great sense of humor because they can
( and do ) laugh at themselves . Jewish jokes have a special position within the ...

Humor in der arabischen Kultur

Author: Georges Tamer

Publisher: De Gruyter

ISBN:

Page: 387

View: 591

Der Sammelband enthält die Beiträge zahlreicher Wissenschaftlerzum Internationalen Symposium Humor in der arabischen Kultur,veranstaltet vom Herausgeber im Juli 2007 an der Freien Universität Berlin. Zunächst wird in der kritischen Betrachtung des frühen religiösen Schrifttums der Muslime - und vor dem Hintergrund entsprechender jüdischer und christlicher Äußerungen - der islamische Diskurs über Wert und Unwert des Humors näher bestimmt und der Frage nachgegangen, inwieweit dabei normative Kräfte frei wurden, die dem Humor der Araber definierte Grenzen zu setzen vermochten. Danach wird die große Bandbreite an Humorvollem in der klassischen arabischen Literatur in den Blick genommen und das den vielfältigen Ausdrucksformen zu Grunde liegende Verbindende - als ein traditionelles arabisches Humorverständnis - offen gelegt. Abschließend werden die Veränderungen des arabischen Humors mit dem Einbruch der Moderne und der Globalisierung sowie die gesellschafts- und politikkritische Rolle des Humors in arabischen Gesellschaften diskutiert. Hochaktuelles Thema im derzeitigen religiösen und kulturellen Diskurs Darstellung von Wesen, Ursprüngen, Formen und Funktionen des Humors in der Arabischen Kultur Von den Anfängen bis in das Zeitalter der Globalisierung

101 Classic Jewish Jokes

Where do Jewish jokes come from ? Who writes them and how do they circulate
? Jewish jokes seem to spring full - blown from the atmosphere and are carried
like pollen to nightclub stages , club meetings , and telephone wires until , finally
 ...

101 Classic Jewish Jokes

Author: Robert Menchin

Publisher: Mustang Publication

ISBN:

Page: 95

View: 761

Discusses the background of American Jewish humor, offers jokes on families, food, assimilation, and other subjects, and briefly profiles leading Jewish comedians

Humor Scholarship

Humor Scholarship

Author: Don Lee Fred Nilsen

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN:

Page: 382

View: 265

More than a bibliography, this state-of-the-art reference book captures the vibrancy and significance of the interdisciplinary field of humor studies while documenting its output. Organized into ten chapters reflecting types of humor and topics of humor research, it provides extensive bibliographies on forty-five fields of humor study, each introduced by an essay outlining trends and pointing to major findings. An appendix of humor research institutes, journals, scholars, and academic programs as well as a subject and author index to the thousands of sources complete the volume.