Anglo Saxon Towers of Lordship

giants' (entageuweorc) was used in relation to ancient stone architecture, ... English account of the Tower of Babel is an excellent example (see above).

Anglo Saxon Towers of Lordship

Author: Michael G. Shapland

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192537229

Page: 272

View: 746

It has long been assumed that England lay outside the Western European tradition of castle-building until after the Norman Conquest of 1066. It is now becoming apparent that Anglo-Saxon lords had been constructing free-standing towers at their residences all across England over the course of the tenth and eleventh centuries. Initially these towers were exclusively of timber, and quite modest in their scale, although only a handful are known from archaeological excavation. There followed the so-called 'tower-nave' churches, towers with only a tiny chapel located inside, which appear to have had a dual function as buildings of elite worship and symbols of secular power and authority. For the first time, this book gathers together the evidence for these remarkable buildings, many of which still stand incorporated into the fabric of Norman and later parish churches and castles. It traces their origin in monasteries, where kings and bishops drew upon Continental European practice to construct centrally-planned, tower-like chapels for private worship and burial, and to mark gates and important entrances, particularly within the context of the tenth-century Monastic Reform. Adopted by the secular aristocracy to adorn their own manorial sites, it argues that many of the known examples would have provided strategic advantage as watchtowers over roads, rivers and beacon-systems, and have acted as focal points for the mustering of troops. The tower-nave form persisted into early Norman England, where it may have influenced a variety of high-status building types, such as episcopal chapels and monastic belltowers, and even the keeps and gatehouses of the earliest stone castles. The aim of this book is to finally establish the tower-nave as an important Anglo-Saxon building type, and to explore the social, architectural, and landscape contexts in which they operated.

Towers in Stone

On the architecture of Vatsalā Temple and Siddhilakṣmī Temple in Bhaktapur, Nepal.

Towers in Stone

Author: Bijay Basukala

Publisher:

ISBN: 9789937597197

Page: 153

View: 370

On the architecture of Vatsalā Temple and Siddhilakṣmī Temple in Bhaktapur, Nepal.

Stone Tower

—arthur miller, march 26, 2001, on politics In After the Fall, Arthur Miller offers the compelling scenic image of a “blasted stone tower”that dominates the ...

Stone Tower

Author: Jeffrey Daniel Mason

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472116509

Page: 317

View: 583

A revealing look at Arthur Miller's political sensibilities as evidenced in his dramatic works and other writings

Ancient Construction

Describes buildings and structures and examines methods and tools of construction in various civilizations around the world, from prehistoric times up until the end of the Roman Empire.

Ancient Construction

Author: Michael Woods

Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books

ISBN: 9780822529989

Page: 88

View: 575

Describes buildings and structures and examines methods and tools of construction in various civilizations around the world, from prehistoric times up until the end of the Roman Empire.

Blue Ridge Fire Towers

Bald, Black Mountain's tower was a steel structure, ... These towers featured a variety of designs, similar to some of the stone lookouts constructed out ...

Blue Ridge Fire Towers

Author: Robert Sorrell

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1625854005

Page: 144

View: 396

Fire lookout towers have graced the highest peaks in the Blue Ridge Mountains for more than a century. Early mountaineers and conservationists began constructing lookouts during the late 1800s. By the 1930s, states and the federal government had built thousands of towers around the country, many in the Blue Ridge. While technology allowed forestry services to use other means for early detection of fires, many towers still stand as a testament to their significance. Author Robert Sorrell details the fascinating history of the lookouts in the Blue Ridge's forests.

The View from the Tower

The word “stone” occurs five times in the scenic directions of the first page alone (1:119), establishing the mood for the coming scenes.

The View from the Tower

Author: Theodore Ziolkowski

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400864909

Page: 216

View: 179

Immediately after World War I, four major European and American poets and thinkers--W. B. Yeats, Robinson Jeffers, R. M. Rilke, and C. G. Jung--moved into towers as their principal habitations. Taking this striking coincidence as its starting point, this book sets out to locate modern turriphilia in its cultural context and to explore the biographical circumstances that motivated the four writers to choose their unusual retreats. From the ziggurats of ancient Mesopotamia to the ivory towers of the fin de si cle, the author traces the emergence of a variety of symbolic associations with the proud towers of the past, ranging from spirituality and intellect to sexuality and sequestration. But in every case the tower served both literally and symbolically as a refuge from the urban modernism with whose values the four writers found themselves at odds. While the classic modernists (Eliot, Woolf, Hart Crane) often singled out the broken tower as the image of a crumbling past, these writers actualized their powerful visions: Yeats and Rilke moved into medieval towers in Ireland and Switzerland, while Jeffers and Jung built themselves towers at Carmel and Bollingen as secluded spaces in which to cultivate the traditions and values they cherished. The last chapter traces this perseverance of the ancient image through its heyday in the twenties and into the present, where it has undergone renewal, institutionalization, and parody. Originally published in 1998. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Towers of the Sunset

Should he cut stone , or should he mortar ? Megaera is surveying the low line of stones that will become the northern wall of the structure .

The Towers of the Sunset

Author: L. E. Modesitt, Jr.

Publisher: Tor Books

ISBN: 9781429938969

Page: 368

View: 256

L.E. Modesitt, Jr.'s The Towers of the Sunset continues his bestselling fantasy series the Saga of Recluce, which is one the most popular in contemporary epic fantasy. Rather than accepting a marriage arranged by his mother, the powerful military matriarch of Westwind, Creslin chooses exile, setting out to find his own identity and developing his magical talents through conflict with the enigmatic white wizards of Candar. What Creslin doesn't know he stands in the way of their plot to subjugate the world. Saga of Recluce #1 The Magic of Recluce / #2 The Towers of Sunset / #3 The Order War / #4 The Magic Engineer / #5 The Death of Chaos / #6 Fall of Angels / #7 The Chaos Balance / #8 The White Order / #9 Colors of Chaos / #10 Magi’i of Cyador / #11 Scion of Cyador / #12 Wellspring of Chaos / #13 Ordermaster / #14 Natural Order Mage / #15 Mage-Guard of Hamor / #16 Arms-Commander / #17 Cyador’s Heirs / #18 Heritage of Cyador /#19 The Mongrel Mage / #20 Outcasts of Order / #21 The Mage-Fire War (forthcoming) Story Collection: Recluce Tales Other Series by L.E. Modesitt, Jr. The Imager Portfolio The Corean Chronicles The Spellsong Cycle The Ghost Books The Ecolitan Matter At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

The Round Towers of Ireland Or the Mysteries of Freemasonry

... a sort of pudding-stone, the very material whereof most of our Round Towers are constructed, and the property of which is to indurate by time.

The Round Towers of Ireland Or the Mysteries of Freemasonry

Author: Henry O'Brien

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1602068216

Page: 536

View: 452

One of only two published works from Irish archaeologist and linguist Henry O'Brien (1808-1835), this classic 1834 study of the ubiquitous round towers of Ireland is hailed by many as a definitive work on the esoteric mysteries of the ancient world.

Towers of the Earth

Tusani and Nosete drew diagrams in the dust, argued over methods, but even the smallest child knew how to stack flat stones into walls and cross-walls and ...

Towers of the Earth

Author: Ardath Mayhar

Publisher: Wildside Press LLC

ISBN: 1434400697

Page: 212

View: 381

When drought and disease destroy the cool pine woods of what is now East Texas, the Geh-i-nah tribe must undertake a hazardous journey westward--to the towering rocks of of the Mesa Verde. Only united under the leadership of one woman, the prophet/healer Ayina, will they be able to survive in this merciless land.

The Bronze Age Towers at Bat Sultanate of Oman

The trench uncovered a series of mudbrick structures, initially presumed to be domestic, outside of and underlying the stone wall of the tower.

The Bronze Age Towers at Bat  Sultanate of Oman

Author: Christopher P. Thornton

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 1934536067

Page: 360

View: 374

In the third millennium B.C.E., the Oman Peninsula was the site of an important kingdom known in Akkadian texts as "Magan," which traded extensively with the Indus Civilization, southern Iran, the Persian Gulf states, and southern Mesopotamia. Excavations have been carried out in this region since the 1970s, although the majority of studies have focused on mortuary monuments at the expense of settlement archaeology. While domestic structures of the Bronze Age have been found and are the focus of current research at Bat, most settlements dating from the third millennium B.C.E. in Oman and the U.A.E. are defined by the presence of large, circular monuments made of mudbrick or stone that are traditionally called "towers." Whether these so-called towers are defensive, agricultural, political, or ritual structures has long been debated, but very few comprehensive studies of these monuments have been attempted. Between 2007 and 2012, the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology conducted excavations at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Bat in the Sultanate of Oman under the direction of the late Gregory L. Possehl. The focus of these years was on the monumental stone towers of the third millennium B.C.E., looking at the when, how, and why of their construction through large-scale excavation, GIS-aided survey, and the application of radiocarbon dates. This has been the most comprehensive study of nonmortuary Bronze Age monuments ever conducted on the Oman Peninsula, and the results provide new insight into the formation and function of these impressive structures that surely formed the social and political nexus of Magan's kingdom.

Tenth Report with Inventory of Monuments and Constructions in the Counties of Midlothian and West Lothian

eastern towers, where the corbelling is similar to that on the curtains. ... south wall and terminates at a bretasche of stone corbelled out on a continuous ...

Tenth Report with Inventory of Monuments and Constructions in the Counties of Midlothian and West Lothian

Author: Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments and Constructions of Scotland

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 259

View: 537

The Bronze Age Towers at Bat Sultanate of Oman

In the third millennium B.C.E., the Oman Peninsula was the site of an important kingdom known in Akkadian texts as "Magan," which traded extensively with the Indus Civilization, southern Iran, the Persian Gulf states, and southern ...

The Bronze Age Towers at Bat  Sultanate of Oman

Author: Christopher P. Thornton

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 1934536075

Page: 360

View: 435

In the third millennium B.C.E., the Oman Peninsula was the site of an important kingdom known in Akkadian texts as "Magan," which traded extensively with the Indus Civilization, southern Iran, the Persian Gulf states, and southern Mesopotamia. Excavations have been carried out in this region since the 1970s, although the majority of studies have focused on mortuary monuments at the expense of settlement archaeology. While domestic structures of the Bronze Age have been found and are the focus of current research at Bat, most settlements dating from the third millennium B.C.E. in Oman and the U.A.E. are defined by the presence of large, circular monuments made of mudbrick or stone that are traditionally called "towers." Whether these so-called towers are defensive, agricultural, political, or ritual structures has long been debated, but very few comprehensive studies of these monuments have been attempted. Between 2007 and 2012, the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology conducted excavations at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Bat in the Sultanate of Oman under the direction of the late Gregory L. Possehl. The focus of these years was on the monumental stone towers of the third millennium B.C.E., looking at the when, how, and why of their construction through large-scale excavation, GIS-aided survey, and the application of radiocarbon dates. This has been the most comprehensive study of nonmortuary Bronze Age monuments ever conducted on the Oman Peninsula, and the results provide new insight into the formation and function of these impressive structures that surely formed the social and political nexus of Magan's kingdom.