The Trojan Epic

tive focus is concerned.28 The temporal concentration of the Trojan Epic is thus
not greatly different from that of the Iliad, with its main focus on four days out of
fifty-two, or from the focus of much of the Odyssey on nine days out of forty.

The Trojan Epic

Author: Quintus of Smyrna

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801886355

Page: 365

View: 761

A vivid and entertaining story in its own right, the Trojan Epic is also particularly significant for what it reveals about its sources -- the much older, now lost Greek epics about the Trojan War known collectively as the Epic Cycle. Written in the Homeric era, these poems recounted events not included in the Iliad or the Odyssey. As Alan James makes clear in this vibrant and faithful new translation, Quintus's work deserves attention for its literary-historical importance and its narrative power. James's line-by-line verse translation in English reveals the original as an exciting and eloquent tale of gods and heroes, bravery and cunning, hubris and brutality. James includes a substantial introduction that places the work in its literary and historical context, a detailed and annotated book-by-book summary of the epic, a commentary on sources, and an explanatory index of proper names.

The Trojan Epic

James includes a substantial introduction that places the work in its literary and historical context, a detailed and annotated book-by-book summary of the epic, a commentary on sources, and an explanatory index of proper names.

The Trojan Epic

Author: Quintus of Smyrna

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 080188635X

Page: 365

View: 819

A vivid and entertaining story in its own right, the Trojan Epic is also particularly significant for what it reveals about its sources -- the much older, now lost Greek epics about the Trojan War known collectively as the Epic Cycle. Written in the Homeric era, these poems recounted events not included in the Iliad or the Odyssey. As Alan James makes clear in this vibrant and faithful new translation, Quintus's work deserves attention for its literary-historical importance and its narrative power. James's line-by-line verse translation in English reveals the original as an exciting and eloquent tale of gods and heroes, bravery and cunning, hubris and brutality. James includes a substantial introduction that places the work in its literary and historical context, a detailed and annotated book-by-book summary of the epic, a commentary on sources, and an explanatory index of proper names.

The Trojan Epic

James includes a substantial introduction which places the work in its literary and historical context, a detailed and annotated book-by-book summary of the epic, a commentary dealing mainly with sources, and an explanatory index of proper ...

The Trojan Epic

Author: Quintus (Smyrnaeus)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 526

Reconstructing the Epic

The Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes and Lycophron ' s Alexandra , which
have survived in their entirety , allow us to trace two different Hellenistic versions
of the ' Trojan ' epic . The absence of the Trojan myth from the Argonautica is a ...

Reconstructing the Epic

Author: Evina Sistakou

Publisher: Peeters Pub & Booksellers

ISBN:

Page: 210

View: 261

The Trojan war inspired a multifaceted mythological tradition which evolved through a variety of artistic devices - oral and written poetry, prose, iconography. In the open system of Trojan war narratives, Homer represents the dominant line, while the cyclic, lyric and tragic poets offer a host of alternative versions. Reconstructing the Epic builds on the premise that the reception of the Trojan myth by the Hellenistic avant-garde reflects their aesthetic and ideological distancing from the elevated genres of the past, particularly the epic. The book monitors the various stages of this modernistic reaction to the literary tradition: the avoidance of the Trojan muthos as narrated in the Homeric epics; the rewriting of the Trojan stories which derive from the Epic Cycle, lyric and dramatic poetry; the incorporation of Trojan episodes into idylls, elegies and epyllia; and the working out of a new Trojan myth recounting, among other things, how the archetypal war hero, Achilles, is eventually transformed into an ardent lover.

The Tradition of the Trojan War in Homer and the Epic Cycle

He traces the development and transmission of the Cyclic poems in ancient Greek culture, comparing them to later Homeric poems and finding that they were far more influential than has previously been thought.

The Tradition of the Trojan War in Homer and the Epic Cycle

Author: Jonathan S. Burgess

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801874815

Page: 320

View: 488

Although the Iliad and Odyssey narrate only relatively small portions of the Trojan War and its aftermath, for centuries these works have overshadowed other, more comprehensive narratives of the conflict, particularly the poems known as the Epic Cycle. In The Tradition of the Trojan War in Homer and the Epic Cycle, Jonathan Burgess challenges Homer's authority on the war's history and the legends surrounding it, placing the Iliad and Odyssey in the larger, often overlooked context of the entire body of Greek epic poetry of the Archaic Age. He traces the development and transmission of the Cyclic poems in ancient Greek culture, comparing them to later Homeric poems and finding that they were far more influential than has previously been thought.

The Trojan War

A Mycenaean - Trojan Time Line More than three thousand years have passed
since the war , or wars , between Mycenaean Greece and Troy that were at the
core of the Trojan epic cycle . Aside from Homer ' s poems , which tantalize us
with ...

The Trojan War

Author: Diane P. Thompson

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Page: 241

View: 902

Looks at the continued interest in stories about Troy through the ages and discusses the legendary war's interest by Shakespeare, Chaucer, Racine, and other authors into the twentieth century.

The Greek Epic

... Ionian region whence the Trojan epic had made its way . It is known from the
orator Lykourgos ( Leocr . , 102 ) that these recitations were of old standing at
Athens : according to Diog . Laert . i . 2 , 57 they were established there from the
time ...

The Greek Epic

Author: George Charles Winter Warr

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 288

View: 849

A History of Classical Greek Literature pt 1 The poets epic and lyric with an appendix on Homer by Prof Sayce V I pt II The dramatic poets V 2 pt 1 The prose writers from Herodotus to Plato V 2 pt II The prose writers from Isocrates to Aristotle

In Cyprus also , later than the Cypria , about 600 B.C. , was completed the
expansion of the Trojan epic , by which the Menis and Oitos [ Grote's Achilleis
and Iliad ] were welded together and extended by the Cretan books N E 0 . ·
Hesiod of ...

A History of Classical Greek Literature  pt  1  The poets  epic and lyric  with an appendix on Homer by Prof  Sayce V  I  pt  II  The dramatic poets V  2  pt 1  The prose writers  from Herodotus to Plato  V  2  pt  II  The prose writers  from Isocrates to Aristotle

Author: John Pentland Mahaffy

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 536

The Classical Epic

The Trojan War . " In Myths of Greece and Rome . New York : American Book
Company , 1895 . Describes the events leading up to the Trojan War , including
the Judgment of Paris , the abduction of Helen , and the early life of Achilles , and
 ...

The Classical Epic

Author: Thomas J. Sienkewicz

Publisher: Magill Bibliographies

ISBN:

Page: 265

View: 99

A selective bibliography on Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid, directed toward the first-time reader of these works in translation, especially high school and general college students looking for sources for course papers and projects.

The Ancient Epic

The battle before the Trojan camp is renewed . Euryalus ' mother , warned by
Rumour , bewails the death of her son . Virgil implores Calliope , the muse of epic
poetry , to aid him sing of the destruction wrought by Turnus ' all - conquering ...

The Ancient Epic

Author: Lester Simon Cramer

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 203

View: 635

Troy

HarperCollins is proud to present its incredible range of best-loved, essential classics.

Troy

Author: Homer

Publisher: William Collins

ISBN: 9780008299392

Page: 384

View: 881

HarperCollins is proud to present its incredible range of best-loved, essential classics.

In Search of the Trojan War

Here too epic poems , such as Beowulf , formed the basis of the interpretation .
Indeed the parallels between Anglo - Saxon and Homeric epic poetry inspired
one of the earliest attempts to draw together these early European traditions of ...

In Search of the Trojan War

Author: Michael Wood

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 281

View: 197

For thousands of years the tale of Troy has captivated the western imagination. Hector and Achilles, Odysseus and the beautiful Helen are among the most enduring figures in art and literature. But did Troy really exist, and did the Trojan war really take place?

Epic Space

architectural continua of all epic poetry . Contrary to the medieval illustrators ,
who had depicted the relevant lines of the epic through fragments of buildings
and landscapes and often depicted Sibyl as a medieval lady , or as a snake -
haired ...

Epic Space

Author: Anthony C. Antoniades

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Incorporated

ISBN:

Page: 298

View: 678

Examines the epic writings of Indo-European and European cultures to explore the ancient landscapes, ceremonial places, intimate rooms, and beautiful gardens that became the basis for western architecture

The Greek Epic Cycle

34 ) to lighten the Trojan burden by causing Achilles to revolt from his duties to
the Greek alliance ; and a catalogue of the allies who fought on the Trojan side .
One infers for the first detail some sort of intended link with the events of Iliad
Book ...

The Greek Epic Cycle

Author: Malcolm Davies

Publisher: Bristol Classical Press

ISBN:

Page: 93

View: 230

After Homer's "Iliad" and "Odyssey", poets of the seventh and sixth centuries BC composed epics which covered other parts of the Trojan War story or different areas of Greek mythology. Collectively these poems became known as 'The Epic Cycle'. This text provides an introduction to this cycle.

Troy

This is the first book systematically to examine Wolfgang Petersen’s epic film Troy from different archaeological, literary, cultural, and cinematic perspectives.

Troy

Author: Martin M. Winkler

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 140517854X

Page: 248

View: 584

This is the first book systematically to examine Wolfgang Petersen’s epic film Troy from different archaeological, literary, cultural, and cinematic perspectives. The first book systematically to examine Wolfgang Petersen’s epic film Troy from different archaeological, literary, cultural, and cinematic perspectives. Examines the film’s use of Homer’s Iliad and the myth of the Trojan War, its presentation of Bronze-Age archaeology, and its place in film history. Identifies the modern political overtones of the Trojan War myth as expressed in the film and explains why it found world-wide audiences. Editor and contributors are archaeologists or classical scholars, several of whom incorporate films into their teaching and research. Includes an annotated list of films and television films and series episodes on the Trojan War. Contains archaeological illustrations of Troy, relevant images of ancient art, and stills from films on the Trojan War.

Social Orders and Social Landscapes

This event was to start a new era for both the Turks and the Trojan epic in Europe
. Folk etymologies easily equated Teucri ( the Trojans as referred to by Virgil )
with Turci / Turchi to the extent that Cardinal Isodore , who had witnessed the ...

Social Orders and Social Landscapes

Author: Laura M. Popova

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Pub

ISBN:

Page: 476

View: 934

Social Orders and Social Landscapes marks a new direction in research for Eurasian archaeology that focuses on how people lived in their local environment and interacted with their near and distant neighbours, rather than on overarching comparisons of archaeological culture complexes. Stemming from the 2005 University of Chicago Eurasian Archaeology Conference, the papers collected here reflect this new research agenda, though the way in which each author addressed the theme of the conference, and thus the book, was strikingly varied. This diversity arises out of the field''s intellectual flux driven by the principled engagement of the rich analytical traditions of the Soviet/CIS, Anglo-American, and European schools. Despite the variability in approaches and subject matter, several key themes emerged: 1) the reinterpretation culture categories by examining particular aspects of social life; 2) the role social memory plays in the production of landscape and place; 3) the influence of the built environment on societies; and 4) the ways in which economic considerations affect social orders and landscapes. The result is a book that helps to re-image Eurasia as a complex landscape fragmented by historically contingent and shifting ecological and social boundaries rather than a bounded mosaic of culture areas or environmental zones. Scholarly research on Eurasia was transformed by the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Entire areas and fields of research became accessible to European and American scholars for the first time, resulting in the emergence of new centers specializing in primary field investigations throughout the vast, politically transformed landmass of Eurasia. One such center is the University of Chicago that has recently sponsored two large international conferences on Eurasian archaeology. Social Orders and Social Landscapes is the product of the second Chicago conference held in spring 2005. The editors of the volume should be proud of their efforts that have resulted in such a broad ranging and prompt publication. The articles encompass a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including archaeology, history, art history, palynology, and zooarchaeology; extend chronologically from Neolithic and Bronze Age times to the formation of national identity in Turkey in the early 20th century; and range geographically from Europe to China. Several articles reconstruct basic subsistence activities; others analyze distinctive settlement types and political and cultural frontiers, including the assimilation and emergence of new, self-defined ethnic groups and the selective adoption of new systems of religious belief. What unites this diverse collection is their consistent emphasis on the social construction of reality and the production of social landscapes and memories that altered perceptions of the physical world and mediated the practical activities that here have been convincingly reconstructed from the archaeological record. In so doing, rigid stereotypes are questioned and novel interpretations persuasively advanced. Early Bronze Age pastoralism on the south Russian steppes did not consist exclusively of herding animals nor was it combined, as it was later in the Iron Age, with the pursuit of agriculture; rather, D. Anthony and D. Brown suggest that at least in the Samara river valley the herding of animals occurred along side the intensive gathering of wild, nutritionally rich plants. The kalas of ancient Chorasmia are not cities, nor even proto-urban formations, but rather are large, heavily fortified enclosures meant to repel attacks of armed nomadic cavalry. They represent a continuation of a distinct Central Asian settlement pattern that began in the Bronze Age and that formed the center of a landscape divided into contiguous, self-contained oases. The Mongols not only herded livestock, but also farmed, fished, hunted, and traded throughout the vast area that they had conquered, uniting most of Eurasia into a single, economically integrated system. New perspectives proliferate throughout this richly detailed and extremely broad ranging collected volume. - Phil Kohl, Professor of Anthropology and the Kathryn W. Davis Professor of Slavic Studies at Wellesley College Social Orders and Social Landscapes is a stimulating addition to the still small literature in English making the rich datasets from the archaeology of Eurasia widely accessible to Western scholars. The authors of the eighteen chapters analyze data from China to the Mediterranean, from the fourth millennium BCE through the fourteenth century CE, with the tools of art and architectural history, text analysis, paleobotany and paleozoology, and anthropological theory, among others. The product of a conference at the University of Chicago, this book fulfils the goal of the graduate student organizers to apply interdisciplinary approaches to understanding the archaeology and history of the Eurasian landmass in local terms through a focus on how people lived in their local environments. In the decade and a half since the end of the Soviet Union, scholarly communication has broadened and the mutual influences have stimulated many new and thought provoking views on the Eurasian past. This book is an exemplary product of the new scholarly discourse. - Karen S. Rubinson, Research Scholar, Department of Anthropology, Barnard College, Columbia University

Epic Moderation

Thus the " will of Jupiter " encompasses and frames the Trojan wandering and
the central point of the action , Latium . Since the Trojans are not where they are
destined to be , the action and plot movement of the first half of the epic are ...

Epic Moderation

Author: Edward Grant Little

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 558

View: 372

The Iliad in Early Greek Art

Finally , it is important to note that while the few Geometric figurescenes which
some scholars have interpreted as representations of episodes in the Trojan epic
poems ( see p . 23 above ) are quite isolated and do not reappear afterwards ,
the ...

The Iliad in Early Greek Art

Author: Knud Friis Johansen

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 287

View: 699