The Scottish People and the French Revolution

Presents a study of the political culture of Scotland in the 1790s. This book compares the emergence of 'the people' as a political force, with popular political movements in England and Ireland.

The Scottish People and the French Revolution

Author: Bob Harris

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317315308

Page: 352

View: 318

Presents a study of the political culture of Scotland in the 1790s. This book compares the emergence of 'the people' as a political force, with popular political movements in England and Ireland. It analyses Scottish responses to the French Revolution across the political spectrum; explaining Loyalist as well as Radical opinions and organisations.

The Scottish People and the French Revolution

Artisans and Democrats: Sheffield and the French Revolution 1789–97 (Sheffield: Sheffield History Pamphlets, 1989). —, 'Popular Radicalism and Popular ...

The Scottish People and the French Revolution

Author: Bob Harris

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317315316

Page: 352

View: 814

Presents a study of the political culture of Scotland in the 1790s. This book compares the emergence of 'the people' as a political force, with popular political movements in England and Ireland. It analyses Scottish responses to the French Revolution across the political spectrum; explaining Loyalist as well as Radical opinions and organisations.

The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution

Support for the revolutionaries, however, was most strikingly embodied by John Millar, ... Harris, The Scottish People and the French Revolution, p. 77, p.

The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution

Author: Anna Plassart

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107091764

Page: 265

View: 928

This book offers the first study of the Scottish Enlightenment reception and interpretation of the French Revolution.

Scotland and the French Revolutionary War 1792 1802

Bob Harris, The Scottish People and the French Revolution (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2008), 133. 33 Dickinson, Liberty and Property, 279–81.

Scotland and the French Revolutionary War  1792 1802

Author: Atle Wold

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 1474406688

Page: 248

View: 873

For the British government's supporters in Scotland in the 1790s, one thing was paramount: they were fighting French principles in any shape or form they might take. Whether this meant defeating the influence of French revolutionary ideas in Scotland, or defeating the military menace of the French republic, they were determined to stand firm in their support of the British state.This book charts the Scottish contribution to, both the war effort of the 1790s, and the British governments struggles to defeat political radicalism at home; lasting from the first outbreak of political disturbances in Scotland in 1792, until the French revolutionary war came to an end in 1802. In this, the Scots made their very distinct mark in terms of recruitment for armed service, demonstrations of loyalty, and prosecutions against political radicals in the law courts but, perhaps less so, in terms of their financial contributions . The government of Scotland was further integrated into the British state in a structural sense over the course of the decade, yet retained many distinctly Scottish features none the less and on the whole the 1790s comes across as a time when the Scots found little difficulty in seeing themselves as both British and Scottish.

Scottish Town in the Age of the Enlightenment 1740 1820

This heavily illustrated and innovative study is founded upon personal documents, town council minutes, legal cases, inventories, travellers' tales, plans and drawings relating to some 30 Scots burghs of the Georgian period.

Scottish Town in the Age of the Enlightenment 1740 1820

Author: Bob Harris

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748692584

Page: 640

View: 186

This heavily illustrated and innovative study is founded upon personal documents, town council minutes, legal cases, inventories, travellers' tales, plans and drawings relating to some 30 Scots burghs of the Georgian period. It establishes a distinctive and much-needed history for the development of Georgian Scots burghs.

Radical Scotland

As social and economic hardship followed in Waterloo's wake, the flame of radicalism was further ignited. This is Scotland's radical history.

Radical Scotland

Author: Kenny MacAskill

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781785905704

Page: 352

View: 971

'I have devoted myself to the cause of the people. It is a good cause - it shall ultimately prevail - it shall finally triumph.' Thomas Muir The Political Martyrs memorial in Edinburgh looms large on the city's skyline but its history is relatively unknown. And that is not by accident. As Edinburgh's New Town was constructed, a narrative of kilts and loyalty was created for Scotland, with its radical history deliberately excluded. The French Revolution lit a spark in Scotland, inspiring radicals and working people alike, and uniting them in opposition to the King and his government. The oligarchy of landowners that ran Scotland was worried. Leading radicals like Thomas Muir and fellow political reformists were later rounded up and transported to Botany Bay. But they fought back and formed the Society of the United Scotsmen, seeking widespread political reform throughout the Union and were prepared to use physical force in defence of their ideals. As social and economic hardship followed in Waterloo's wake, the flame of radicalism was further ignited. This is Scotland's radical history.

Political Trials in an Age of Revolutions

1789–1794)”, Scottish Historical Review, 84 (2005), 38–62; and Bob Harris, The Scottish People and the French Revolution (London, 2008), 45–74. 9.

Political Trials in an Age of Revolutions

Author: Michael T. Davis

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319989596

Page: 398

View: 401

This collection provides new insights into the ’Age of Revolutions’, focussing on state trials for treason and sedition, and expands the sophisticated discussion that has marked the historiography of that period by examining political trials in Britain and the north Atlantic world from the 1790s and into the nineteenth century. In the current turbulent period, when Western governments are once again grappling with how to balance security and civil liberty against the threat of inflammatory ideas and actions during a period of international political and religious tension, it is timely to re-examine the motives, dilemmas, thinking and actions of governments facing similar problems during the ‘Age of Revolutions’. The volume begins with a number of essays exploring the cases tried in England and Scotland in 1793-94 and examining those political trials from fresh angles (including their implications for legal developments, their representation in the press, and the emotion and the performances they generated in court). Subsequent sections widen the scope of the collection both chronologically (through the period up to the Reform Act of 1832 and extending as far as the end of the nineteenth century) and geographically (to Revolutionary France, republican Ireland, the United States and Canada). These comparative and longue durée approaches will stimulate new debate on the political trials of Georgian Britain and of the north Atlantic world more generally as well as a reassessment of their significance. This book deliberately incorporates essays by scholars working within and across a number of different disciplines including Law, Literary Studies and Political Science.

Welsh Poetry of the French Revolution 1789 1805

Harris, Bob, the Scottish People and the French Revolution (London, 2008). Harris, John, Vox Stellarum & Planetarum, sef, Lleferydd y Ser Gwibiog a ...

Welsh Poetry of the French Revolution  1789 1805

Author: Cathryn A. Charnell-White

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN: 0708325297

Page: 498

View: 475

This anthology presents a selection of the poems with which Welsh writers living in Wales and London participated, through the medium of Welsh, to the controversy in Britain surrounding the French Revolution. These Welsh poems have been edited and translated into English for the first time ever. It also considers the cultural inheritance of the French Revolution in eisteddfodic poetry and poems to national heroes in which the competing notions of Welshness and Britishness come to the fore.

The Press and the People

W. J. Couper , The Edinburgh Periodical Press ( 2 vols . , Stirling , 1908 ) , ii . 191-9 ; Bob Harris , ' Scotland's Newspapers , the French Revolution and ...

The Press and the People

Author: Adam Fox

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198791291

Page: 432

View: 565

The Press and the People is the first full-length study of cheap print in early modern Scotland. It traces the production and distribution of ephemeral publications from the nation's first presses in the early sixteenth century through to the age of Burns in the late eighteenth. It explores the development of the Scottish book trade in general and the production of slight and popular texts in particular. Focusing on the means by which these works reached a wide audience, it illuminates the nature of their circulation in both urban and rural contexts. Specific chapters examine single-sheet imprints such as ballads and gallows speeches, newssheets and advertisements, as well as the little pamphlets that contained almanacs and devotional works, stories and songs. The study demonstrates just how much more of this literature was once printed than now survives and argues that Scotland had a much larger market for such material than has been appreciated hitherto. By illustrating the ways in which Scottish printers combined well-known titles from England with a distinctive repertoire of their own, The Press and the People transforms our understanding of popular culture in early modern Scotland and Britain more widely.

Scottish Town in the Age of the Enlightenment 1740 1820

Bob Harris, The Scottish People and the French Revolution (London, 2008), Chapter 6. 137. University of Dundee Archives and Special Collections, ...

Scottish Town in the Age of the Enlightenment 1740 1820

Author: Bob Harris

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748692592

Page: 604

View: 914

This heavily illustrated and innovative study is founded upon personal documents, town council minutes, legal cases, inventories, travellers' tales, plans and drawings relating to some 30 Scots burghs of the Georgian period. It establishes a distinctive a

Scotland and America c 1600 c 1800

Whyte, Scotland and the Abolition of Black Slavery, 74; Bob Harris, The Scottish People and the French Revolution (2008), 40, 231. Whyte, Scotland and the ...

Scotland and America  c 1600 c 1800

Author: Alexander Murdoch

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137238038

Page: 216

View: 237

While the literature relating to Scottish contact with America has grown significantly in recent years, the influence of America on Scotland and its early modern history has been neglected in favour of a preoccupation with Scottish influence on the formation of North American national identities. Alexander Murdoch's fascinating new study explores Scottish interactions with North America in a desire to open up fresh perspectives on the subject. Scotland and America, c.1600-c.1800 • surveys the key centuries of economic, migratory and cultural exchange, including Canada and the Caribbean • discusses Scottish participation in the Atlantic slave trade and the debate over its abolition • considers the Scottish experience of British unionism with respect to developing American traditions of unionism in the U.S. and Canada. Incorporating the latest research, this is essential reading for anyone interested in the dynamic relationship between Scotland and America during a key period in history.

Association and Enlightenment

Scottish Clubs and Societies, 1700-1830 Mark C. Wallace, Jane Rendall ... Bob Harris, The Scottish People and the French Revolution (London: Routledge, ...

Association and Enlightenment

Author: Mark C. Wallace

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 1684482682

Page: 304

View: 987

Social clubs as they existed in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Scotland were varied: they could be convivial, sporting, or scholarly, or they could be a significant and dynamic social force, committed to improvement and national regeneration as well as to sociability. The essays in this volume—the first full-length study of the subject in fifty years—examine the complex history of clubs and societies in Scotland from 1700 to 1830. Contributors address attitudes toward associations, their meeting-places and rituals, their links with the growth of the professions and with literary culture, and the ways in which they were structured by both class and gender. By widening the context in which clubs and societies are set, this volume offers a new framework for understanding them, bringing together the inheritance of the Scottish past, the unique and cohesive polite culture of the Scottish Enlightenment, and the broader context of associational patterns common to Britain, Ireland, and beyond.

Re imagining Democracy in the Age of Revolutions

America, France, Britain, Ireland 1750-1850 Joanna Innes, Mark Philp ... Harris, Bob, The Scottish People and the French Revolution (London, 2008) .

Re imagining Democracy in the Age of Revolutions

Author: Joanna Innes

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 019164661X

Page: 256

View: 355

Re-imagining Democracy in the Age of Revolutions charts a transformation in the way people thought about democracy in the North Atlantic region in the years between the American Revolution and the revolutions of 1848. In the mid-eighteenth century, 'democracy' was a word known only to the literate. It was associated primarily with the ancient world and had negative connotations: democracies were conceived to be unstable, warlike, and prone to mutate into despotisms. By the mid-nineteenth century, however, the word had passed into general use, although it was still not necessarily an approving term. In fact, there was much debate about whether democracy could achieve robust institutional form in advanced societies. In this volume, a cast of internationally-renowned contributors shows how common trends developed throughout the United States, France, Britain, and Ireland, particularly focussing on the era of the American, French, and subsequent European revolutions. Re-imagining Democracy in the Age of Revolutions argues that 'modern democracy' was not invented in one place and then diffused elsewhere, but instead was the subject of parallel re-imaginings, as ancient ideas and examples were selectively invoked and reworked for modern use. The contributions significantly enhance our understanding of the diversity and complexity of our democratic inheritance.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Scottish History

Historians can tell a fairly straightforward story: of how the French Revolution was initially welcomed by most people in Scotland, but developed in such a ...

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Scottish History

Author: T. M. Devine

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191624330

Page: 720

View: 542

Over the last three decades major advances in research and scholarship have transformed understanding of the Scottish past. In this landmark study some of the most eminent writers on the subject, together with emerging new talents, have combined to produce a large-scale volume which reconsiders in fresh and illuminating ways the classic themes of the nation's history since the sixteenth century as well as a number of new topics which are only now receiving detailed attention. Such major themes as the Reformation, the Union of 1707, the Scottish Enlightenment, clearances, industrialisation, empire, emigration, and the Great War are approached from novel and fascinating perspectives, but so too are such issues as the Scottish environment, myth, family, criminality, the literary tradition, and Scotland's contemporary history. All chapters contain expert syntheses of current knowledge, but their authors also stand back and reflect critically on the questions which still remain unanswered, the issues which generate dispute and controversy, and sketch out where appropriate the agenda for future research. The Handbook also places the Scottish experience firmly into an international historical perspective with a considerable focus on the age-old emigration of the Scottish people, the impact of successive waves of immigrants to Scotland, and the nation's key role within the British Empire. The overall result is a vibrant and stimulating review of modern Scottish history: essential reading for students and scholars alike.

A People s History of Scotland

123 Gordon Pentland, “The French Revolution, Scottish Radicalism and the “People Who Were Called Jacobins”, in Ulrich Broich, H. T. Dickinson, ...

A People s History of Scotland

Author: Chris Bambery

Publisher: Verso Trade

ISBN: 1781682844

Page: 374

View: 692

In September 2014, the people of Scotland will decide whether after 407 years of British rule they want to be an independent country. Chris Bambery, a leading figure in the Scottish Independence campaign, seizes the opportunity to delve into the real and oft-forgotten history of Scotland. A People's History of Scotland is a corrective to the usual history of kings and queens, victorious battles and bloody defeats. Rather it tells the story that matters today, the story of freedom fighters, suffragettes, the workers of Red Clydesdale who fought for their rights, and the contemporary struggle for independence. It looks at the struggles for nationhood as well as for a socialist future, while also charting the lives of Scots who changed the world- from the real MacBeth, to the father of modern capitalism, Adam Smith, as well as campaigner Mary Brooksbank. This is a passionate cry for more than just independence but also for a nation that has socialist roots.

English language Poetry from Wales 1789 1806

... Scottish and Irish Romanticism (Oxford, 2008); and Bob Harris, The Scottish People and the French Revolution (London, 2008), for recent examples of the ...

English language Poetry from Wales 1789 1806

Author: Elizabeth Edwards

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN: 0708325696

Page: 272

View: 865

This new selection of Anglophone Welsh poetry presents a range of literary responses to the French Revolution and the ensuing wars with France, a period in which Wales and its history became prime imaginative territory for poets of all political sympathies.

Napoleon and British Song 1797 1822

... The Scottish People and the French Revolution (2008) Tim Harris (ed.), Popular Culture in England, c. 1500–1850 (Basingstoke, 1995) Frank L. Harrison, ...

Napoleon and British Song  1797 1822

Author: Oskar Cox Jensen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137555386

Page: 261

View: 864

This study offers a radical reassessment of a crucial period of political and cultural history. By looking at some 400 songs, many of which are made available to hear, and at their writers, singers, and audiences, it questions both our relationship with song, and ordinary Britons' relationship with Napoleon, the war, and the idea of Britain itself.

The Oxford Handbook of British Romanticism

... 1790–1832 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007). Harris, Bob, The Scottish People and the French Revolution (London: Pickering and Chatto, ...

The Oxford Handbook of British Romanticism

Author: David Duff

Publisher: Oxford Handbooks

ISBN: 0199660891

Page: 816

View: 697

This handbook provides a comprehensive overview of British Romantic literature and an authoritative guide to all aspects of the movement including its historical, cultural, and intellectual contexts, and its connections with the literature and thought of other countries. All the major Romantic writers are covered alongside lesser known writers.

Victorian Political Culture

See Bob Harris, The Scottish People and the French Revolution (2008). 56 For the argument that 'Britishness' built on long-standing notions of 'Englishness' ...

Victorian Political Culture

Author: Angus Hawkins

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198728484

Page: 428

View: 226

Victorian Britain is often described as an age of dawning democracy and as an exemplar of the modern Liberal state; yet a hereditary monarchy, a hereditary House of Lords, and an established Anglican Church survived as influential aspects of national public life with traditional elites assuming redefined roles. After 1832, constitutional notions of 'mixed government' gradually gave way to the orthodoxy of 'parliamentary government', shaping the function and nature of political parties in Westminster and the constituencies, as well as the relations between them. Following the 1867-8 Reform Acts, national political parties began to replace the premises of 'parliamentary government'. The subsequent emergence of a mass male electorate in the 1880s and 1890s prompted politicians to adopt new language and methods by which to appeal to voters, while enduring public values associated with morality, community and evocations of the past continued to shape Britain's distinctive political culture. This gave a particularly conservative trajectory to the nation's entry into the twentieth century. This study of British political culture from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century examines the public values that informed perceptions of the constitution, electoral activity, party partisanship, and political organization. Its exploration of Victorian views of status, power, and authority as revealed in political language, speeches, and writing, as well as theology, literature, and science, shows how the development of moral communities rooted in readings of the past enabled politicians to manage far-reaching change. This presents a new over-arching perspective on the constitutional and political transformations of the Victorian age.