The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick

The film explores the tragic consequences of an unbending moral code in a constantly changing universe. Essays in the volume examine Kubrick’s interest in morality and fate, revealing a Stoic philosophy at the center of many of his films.

The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick

Author: Jerold Abrams

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 081317256X

Page: 288

View: 716

In the course of fifty years, director Stanley Kubrick produced some of the most haunting and indelible images on film. His films touch on a wide range of topics rife with questions about human life, behavior, and emotions: love and sex, war, crime, madness, social conditioning, and technology. Within this great variety of subject matter, Kubrick examines different sides of reality and unifies them into a rich philosophical vision that is similar to existentialism. Perhaps more than any other philosophical concept, existentialism—the belief that philosophical truth has meaning only if it is chosen by the individual—has come down from the ivory tower to influence popular culture at large. In virtually all of Kubrick’s films, the protagonist finds himself or herself in opposition to a hard and uncaring world, whether the conflict arises in the natural world or in human institutions. Kubrick’s war films (Fear and Desire, Paths of Glory, Dr. Strangelove, and Full Metal Jacket) examine how humans deal with their worst fears—especially the fear of death—when facing the absurdity of war. Full Metal Jacket portrays a world of physical and moral change, with an environment in continual flux in which attempting to impose order can be dangerous. The film explores the tragic consequences of an unbending moral code in a constantly changing universe. Essays in the volume examine Kubrick’s interest in morality and fate, revealing a Stoic philosophy at the center of many of his films. Several of the contributors find his oeuvre to be characterized by skepticism, irony, and unfettered hedonism. In such films as A Clockwork Orange and 2001: A Space Odyssey, Kubrick confronts the notion that we will struggle against our own scientific and technological innovations. Kubrick’s films about the future posit that an active form of nihilism will allow humans to accept the emptiness of the world and push beyond it to form a free and creative view of humanity. Taken together, the essays in The Philosophy of Stanley Kubrick are an engaging look at the director’s stark vision of a constantly changing moral and physical universe. They promise to add depth and complexity to the interpretation of Kubrick’s signature films.

Shadow Philosophy Plato s Cave and Cinema

Offering a close reading of the controversial classic film A Clockwork Orange, and an introductory account of the central themes of the philosophical classic The Republic, this book will be of interest to both scholars and students of ...

Shadow Philosophy  Plato s Cave and Cinema

Author: Nathan Andersen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317805887

Page: 160

View: 174

Shadow Philosophy: Plato’s Cave and Cinema is an accessible and exciting new contribution to film-philosophy, which shows that to take film seriously is also to engage with the fundamental questions of philosophy. Nathan Andersen brings Stanley Kubrick’s film A Clockwork Orange into philosophical conversation with Plato’s Republic, comparing their contributions to themes such as the nature of experience and meaning, the character of justice, the contrast between appearance and reality, the importance of art, and the impact of images. At the heart of the book is a novel account of the analogy between Plato’s allegory of the cave and cinema, developed in conjunction with a provocative interpretation of the most powerful image from A Clockwork Orange, in which the lead character is strapped to a chair and forced to watch violent films. Key features of the book include: a comprehensive bibliography of suggested readings on Plato, on film, on philosophy, and on the philosophy of film a list of suggested films that can be explored following the approach in this book, including brief descriptions of each film, and suggestions regarding its philosophical implications a summary of Plato’s Republic, book by book, highlighting both dramatic context and subject matter. Offering a close reading of the controversial classic film A Clockwork Orange, and an introductory account of the central themes of the philosophical classic The Republic, this book will be of interest to both scholars and students of philosophy and film, as well as to readers of Plato and fans of Stanley Kubrick.

Kubrick s Total Cinema

An original study of Kubrick's philosophical themes and cinematic qualities: time, light, speech, music, poiesis, corporeality, war, eros, technology, and transcendence.

Kubrick s Total Cinema

Author: Philip Kuberski

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441156879

Page: 208

View: 234

An original study of Kubrick's philosophical themes and cinematic qualities: time, light, speech, music, poiesis, corporeality, war, eros, technology, and transcendence.

Man Machine Interaction in the Work of Stanley Kubrick

Recent philosophical currents like the work of Deleuze, Maturana and the academic gender discourse try to evolve a new coining of the term 'machinic' that goes beyond rigid dualistic notions.

Man Machine Interaction in the Work of Stanley Kubrick

Author: Thorsten Felden

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638721930

Page: 76

View: 879

Thesis (M.A.) from the year 2006 in the subject Film Science, grade: 1,3, University of Cologne (Englisches Seminar), 42 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In this paper, I want to examine Kubrick's work for the notion of man interacting with machines and relate it to various theoretical models that also deal with the relation of man and machine. I chose the term 'machine' as a generic term for any theory applying technological, mechanical or machinic ideas, most of which using the machine as a metaphor for sociological, philosophical or psychoanalytic approaches. At the same time, I want to illustrate on the basis of Kubrick's work how the theoretical discourse on this topic has changed in the course of time. Being initially cut down to a very literal understanding of machines as actual physical devices, the 20th century discourse about technology has shown that the demarcation line between what is nature and what is technology is not as easily drawn as it might appear. Man is inseparably bound up with his tools and culture as a whole could be regarded as some kind of machinery. Thus, a great part of both this paper and Kubrick's work deals with the notion of a cultural machine. Another part, however, will leave the narrow view of the machine as a strictly cultural metaphor. Recent philosophical currents like the work of Deleuze, Maturana and the academic gender discourse try to evolve a new coining of the term 'machinic' that goes beyond rigid dualistic notions. I will try to show that these ideas can be found in Kubrick's films as well.

The Philosophy of Horror

Inviting readers to ponder this genre's various manifestations since the late 1700s, this collection of probing essays allows fans and philosophy buffs alike to view horror narratives with fresh eyes and consider their dark themes within ...

The Philosophy of Horror

Author: Thomas Richard Fahy

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813125731

Page: 259

View: 107

Sitting on pins and needles, anxiously waiting to see what will happen next, horror audiences crave the fear and exhilaration generated by a terrifying story; their anticipation is palpable. But they also breathe a sigh of relief when the action is over, when they are able to close their books or leave the movie theater. Whether serious, kitschy, frightening, or ridiculous, horror not only arouses the senses but also raises profound questions about fear, safety, justice, and suffering. From literature and urban legends to film and television, horror's ability to thrill has made it an integral part of modern entertainment. Thomas Fahy and twelve other scholars reveal the underlying themes of the genre in The Philosophy of Horror. Examining the evolving role of horror, the contributing authors investigate works such as Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), horror films of the 1930s, Stephen King's novels, Stanley Kubrick's adaptation of The Shining (1980), and Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960). Also examined are works that have largely been ignored in philosophical circles, including Truman Capote's In Cold Blood (1965), Patrick Süskind's Perfume (1985), and James Purdy's Narrow Rooms (2005). The analysis also extends to contemporary forms of popular horror and "torture-horror" films of the last decade, including Saw (2004), Hostel (2005), The Devil's Rejects (2005), and The Hills Have Eyes (2006), as well as the ongoing popularity of horror on the small screen. The Philosophy of Horror celebrates the strange, compelling, and disturbing elements of horror, drawing on interpretive approaches such as feminist, postcolonial, Marxist, and psychoanalytic criticism. The book invites readers to consider horror's various manifestations and transformations since the late 1700s, probing its social, cultural, and political functions in today's media-hungry society.

A Critical Companion to Stanley Kubrick

The eighteen chapters in this book provide innovative readi.

A Critical Companion to Stanley Kubrick

Author: Elsa Colombani

Publisher: Critical Companions to Contemporary Directors

ISBN: 9781793613769

Page: 326

View: 847

A Critical Companion to Stanley Kubrick provides an in-depth analysis of the director's work and offers an enriching view of the historical, philosophical, theoretical, artistic, and cinematic dimensions of his films. The eighteen chapters in this book provide innovative readings of Kubrick's oeuvre that will surely spark new discussions.

Stanley Kubrick

. . . A brisk study of [Kubrick's] films, with enough of the life tucked in to add context as well as brightness and bite."--Dwight Garner, New York Times "An engaging and well-researched primer to the work of a cinematic legend.

Stanley Kubrick

Author: David Mikics

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300224400

Page: 248

View: 263

An engrossing biography of one of the most influential filmmakers in cinematic history "A cool, cerebral book about a cool, cerebral talent. . . . A brisk study of [Kubrick's] films, with enough of the life tucked in to add context as well as brightness and bite."--Dwight Garner, New York Times "An engaging and well-researched primer to the work of a cinematic legend."--Library Journal Kubrick grew up in the Bronx, a doctor's son. From a young age he was consumed by photography, chess, and, above all else, movies. He was a self-taught filmmaker and self-proclaimed outsider, and his films exist in a unique world of their own outside the Hollywood mainstream. Kubrick's Jewishness played a crucial role in his idea of himself as an outsider. Obsessed with rebellion against authority, war, and male violence, Kubrick was himself a calm, coolly masterful creator and a talkative, ever-curious polymath immersed in friends and family. Drawing on interviews and new archival material, David Mikics for the first time explores the personal side of Kubrick's films.

Perspectives on Stanley Kubrick

Geduld Mario Falsetto. Playboy Interview : Stanley Kubrick ERIC NORDERN
rebirth as one criticize its esse PLAYBOY : Much of the controversy surrounding
2001 deals with the meaning of the metaphysical symbols that abound in the
filmthe ...

Perspectives on Stanley Kubrick

Author: Geduld

Publisher: Macmillan Reference USA

ISBN:

Page: 345

View: 559

A collection of articles on the American director's ten most crucial films and interviews with him, including those in Playboy and Rolling Stone. Among the topics are patterns of filmic narration in The Killing and Lolita, filming 2001: A Space Odyssey, photographing Barry Lyndon, and the unravelling of patriarchy in Full Metal Jacket. Includes a full filmography. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Stanley Kubrick Archives

A comprehensive exploration of American filmmaker Stanley Kubrick's cinematic life's work and creative process featuring film stills, articles and essays by Kubrick and Kubrick scholars, letters, interviews, notes, and photographs.

The Stanley Kubrick Archives

Author: Alison Castle

Publisher:

ISBN: 9783836555821

Page: 864

View: 389

A comprehensive exploration of American filmmaker Stanley Kubrick's cinematic life's work and creative process featuring film stills, articles and essays by Kubrick and Kubrick scholars, letters, interviews, notes, and photographs.

Are We Alone

This collection of those interviews represents scientific, philosophical and ethical considerations of the implications of the possibility of other forms of life.

Are We Alone

Author: Anthony Frewin

Publisher: Elliott & Thompson

ISBN: 9781904027454

Page: 320

View: 905

Anthony Frewin, who was Stanley Kubrick's assistant for over twenty-five years, has provided a comprehensive Introduction, a bibliography and notes to all the interviews which both contextualise and up-date the originals. Are We Alone? is a fascinating collection of essential contributions to one of the great unanswered questions of our time: Is anybody out there?

Film Review

95 h / b * * * via such intriguingly titled essays as God ' s Lonely Man ( about Taxi
Driver ) . Likewise , Jerold J Abrams performs the same task in The Philosophy of
Stanley Kubrick ( same price and publisher * * * ) . " yon , If you were fascinated ...

Film Review

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 532

The Metamorphosis of Alex in Stanley Kubrick s Clockwork Orange from a Viewpoint of Abnormal Psychology

Essay from the year 2006 in the subject Psychology - Clinic and Health Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, grade: A, San Diego State University, 0 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece from ...

The Metamorphosis of Alex in Stanley Kubrick s  Clockwork Orange  from a Viewpoint of Abnormal Psychology

Author: Heiko Böttcher

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3638631095

Page: 4

View: 721

Essay from the year 2006 in the subject Psychology - Clinic and Health Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, grade: A, San Diego State University, 0 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece from 1971 dealt with deep philosophical questions without giving any answers. The observer has no easy way to identify himself with any characters or the pictured society as a full load. The movie is reflecting the dilemma that the only way to increase moral is to decrease freedom. In Kubrick’s movie the dualistic society consists only of perpetrators and victims. The roles are fixed but the persons are interchangable. Therefore there is nobody who could be able to be responsible to handle the power to decrease freedom. On the other hand there are deviant personalities that abuse their freedom to violate the law. Psychologic methods introduced in the movie cannot improve the moral of the society because they can only change a former perpetrator to a victim if the world is dichotom between “anvil and hammer”. Who then should condition the conditioners? The movie reflects the zeitgeist of the early seventies when people began to doubt that the utopia of B.F. Skinners “Walden Two” could be realized or should be wished. The ortodox behaviouristic paradigm that a human being is only a reflection of his/her learning history tottered dramatically in this time. Behaviouristic methods used by mighty officials of a sick society cannot heal criminal indiviuals and are no panacea. All they can do is take their freedom of choice. Kubrick was no psychologist and in his oeuvre he borrowed the stylistic tool of disassociation and threrfore he probably used no behavioural textbook showing the methods and he gives more a general idea about it. For example the cable system around Alex’ forehead is more a metaphor of Jesus’ crown of thorns than a necessary device in the treatment.

Cinematic Mythmaking

In Cinematic Mythmaking, Irving Singer explores the hidden and overt use of myth in various films and, in general, the philosophical elements of a film's meaning.

Cinematic Mythmaking

Author: Irving Singer

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262264846

Page: 256

View: 673

Mythic themes and philosophical probing in film as an art form, as seen in works of Preston Sturges, Jean Cocteau, Stanley Kubrick, and various other filmmakers. Film is the supreme medium for mythmaking. The gods and heroes of mythology are both larger than life and deeply human; they teach us about the world, and they tell us a good story. Similarly, our experience of film is both distant and intimate. Cinematic techniques—panning, tracking, zooming, and the other tools in the filmmaker's toolbox—create a world that is unlike reality and yet realistic at the same time. We are passive spectators, but we also have a personal relationship with the images we are seeing. In Cinematic Mythmaking, Irving Singer explores the hidden and overt use of myth in various films and, in general, the philosophical elements of a film's meaning. Mythological themes, Singer writes, perform a crucial role in cinematic art and even philosophy itself. Singer incisively disentangles the strands of different myths in the films he discusses. He finds in Preston Sturges's The Lady Eve that Barbara Stanwyck's character is not just the biblical Eve but a liberated woman of our times; Eliza Doolittle in the filmed versions of Shaw's Pygmalion is not just a statue brought to life but instead a heroic woman who must survive her own dark night of the soul. The protagonist of William Wyler's The Heiress and Anieszka Holland's Washington Square is both suffering Dido and an awakened Amazon. Singer reads Cocteau's films—including La Belle et la Bête, Orphée, and The Testament of Orpheus—as uniquely mythological cinematic poetry. He compares Kubrickean and Homeric epics and analyzes in depth the self-referential mythmaking of Federico Fellini in many of his movies, including 81⁄2. The aesthetic and probing inventiveness in film, Singer shows us, restores and revives for audiences in the twenty-first century myths of creation, of the questing hero, and of ideals—both secular and religious—that have had enormous significance throughout the human search for love and meaning in life.

Film as Embodied Art

Drawing on state-of-the-art discoveries within embodied cognitive science, this book sets out to address these and other questions by revealing Kubrick as a genuine artist of embodied meaning-making, a filmmaker who perhaps more than any ...

Film as Embodied Art

Author: Maarten Coëgnarts

Publisher: Academic Studies PRess

ISBN: 1644691140

Page: 264

View: 384

How do the films of Kubrick communicate mental events of characters in a purely visual manner? And how does the music in his films express meaning when music in essence is an abstract and non-representational art form? Drawing on state-of-the-art discoveries within embodied cognitive science, this book sets out to address these and other questions by revealing Kubrick as a genuine artist of embodied meaning-making, a filmmaker who perhaps more than any other director, uses all the resources of filmmaking in such a controlled and dense manner as to elicit the embodied tools necessary to achieve a level of conceptual clarity.

Philosophy

STANLEY KUBRICK 2 These are the essential concerns of the philosopher of
history . What , if anything , does history mean ? How can we learn from it ? Is
there any way that our understanding of history can shed light on our own
troubled ...

Philosophy

Author: James Lee Christian

Publisher: Harcourt College Pub

ISBN:

Page: 738

View: 997

This popular introductory text provides a unique diversity of teaching tools for instructors who prefer a synoptic approach. The text is visually appealing and reader friendly. The author accents his accessible writing with cartoons, quotations, and related findings from the social and physical sciences, reinforcing his emphasis on philosophy as the individual's attempt to unify disparate world views. The level of writing makes all philosophical concepts accessible to students. The emphasis is on synoptic thinking and providing the "big picture," including analytical skills. The biographies give the student a feeling for the great thinkers who have fashioned the Western philosophic tradition and have determined largely how we think today.

The Stanley Kubrick Archives

This special anniversary-edition work explores Stanley Kubrick's archives. With selected articles and essays and extensive film notes, this work offers the most comprehensive study of the filmmaker to date.

The Stanley Kubrick Archives

Author: Alison Castle

Publisher: Taschen America Llc

ISBN: 9783836508896

Page: 544

View: 626

This special anniversary-edition work explores Stanley Kubrick's archives. With selected articles and essays and extensive film notes, this work offers the most comprehensive study of the filmmaker to date.

Pink Floyd and Philosophy

According to one urban legend , film director Stanley Kubrick asked Pink Floyd if
he could use Atom Heart Mother for A Clockwork Orange , but Roger Waters said
“ No , ” and then later regretted it ; a variation says Waters ' s regret was about ...

Pink Floyd and Philosophy

Author: George A. Reisch

Publisher: Open Court Publishing

ISBN:

Page: 298

View: 333

"Essays critically examine philosophical concepts and problems in the music and lyrics of the band Pink Floyd"--Provided by publisher.

Philosophy Goes to the Movies

Drawing on many popular and some lesser known films from around the world, Christopher Falzon introduces students to key areas in philosophy, like: • Ethics • Social and Political Philosophy • The Theory of Knowledge • The Self and ...

Philosophy Goes to the Movies

Author: Christopher Falzon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317812875

Page: 332

View: 145

Now emulated in several competing publications, but still unsurpassed in clarity and insight, Philosophy Goes to the Movies: An Introduction to Philosophy, Third Edition builds on the approach that made the two earlier editions so successful. Drawing on many popular and some lesser known films from around the world, Christopher Falzon introduces students to key areas in philosophy, like: • Ethics • Social and Political Philosophy • The Theory of Knowledge • The Self and Personal Identity • Critical Thinking Perfect for beginners, this book guides the reader through philosophy using illuminating cinematic works, like Avatar, Inception, Fight Club, Wings of Desire, Run Lola Run, A Clockwork Orange, Blade Runner, Dirty Harry and many other films. The fully revised and updated Third Edition features: an expanded introduction that provides a new discussion of the relationship between film and philosophy; new material on notable philosophers such as Aristotle, Merleau-Ponty and Rawls; and coverage of new topics like virtue ethics and what Socrates offers for critical thinking. An updated glossary, references and bibliography, and a filmography, are also included in the Third Edition.

A Clockwork Orange

'This is a remarkable and highly unusual book.

A Clockwork Orange

Author: Peter Krämer

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137145226

Page: 200

View: 866

What is the attraction of violence? What is the relationship between real and imagined violence? What should be the state's response to both? These questions are raised by Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange (1971). The film is a graphically violent, sexually explicit, wickedly funny, visually stunning and deeply ambiguous adaptation of Anthony Burgess's 1962 novel. A Clockwork Orange became one of the biggest hits of the early 1970s and was widely acclaimed as a masterpiece. At the same time, it was the target of extraordinary critical attacks, which condemned its apparent message about human nature and its presumed negative impact on young cinemagoers. Drawing on new research in the Stanley Kubrick Archive, Peter Krämer's study explores the production, marketing and reception as well as the themes and style of A Clockwork Orange against the backdrop of Kubrick's previous work and wider developments in British and American cinema, culture and society from the 1950s to the early 1970s. 'This is a remarkable and highly unusual book. Krämer turns aside from the endlessly repeated queries about whether a film like A Clockwork Orange might 'cause people to go out and rape', and asks instead: how does this film participate in that very debate? What philosophy of human nature drove Kubrick to construct the film? Krämer takes us into the film's detailed construction, so we can judge its contribution for ourselves.' Martin Barker, Aberystwyth University Peter Krämer is a Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at the University of East Anglia, UK. He is the author of 2001: A Space Odyssey in the BFI Film Classics series (2010) and The New Hollywood: From Bonnie and Clyde to Star Wars (2005).