The Native Labor Problem of South Africa

This may be to the temporary disadvantage of certain privileged groups — but
unless it is done soon , the ultimate and inevitable reorganization of the domestic
economy of South Africa on a sounder basis will be rendered more difficult and ...

The Native Labor Problem of South Africa

Author: James Maddison Tinley

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 281

View: 620

The problem of exploitation of native labor in South Africa is an outgrowth of the conscious policy of discrimination against natives that has been followed by successive governments and supported by the white labor unions. The whole development of South Africa is based on the existence of a large supply of cheap unskilled native labor, and it is an excellent example of the dislocations that occur when an economy of prices and wages is superimposed on a more primitive tribal economy. Originally published in 1942. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

The South African Native Problem a Suggested Solution Being a Paper Read Before the Union Club of South Africa and the Native Affairs Society of Th

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923.

The South African Native Problem  a Suggested Solution  Being a Paper Read Before the Union Club of South Africa  and the Native Affairs Society of Th

Author: Frederick W. Bell

Publisher: Nabu Press

ISBN: 9781293589861

Page: 22

View: 605

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

The South African Native Problem a Suggested Solution Being a Paper Read Before the Union Club of South Africa and the Native Affairs Society of the Transvaal on 14th October 1909

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

The South African Native Problem  a Suggested Solution  Being a Paper Read Before the Union Club of South Africa  and the Native Affairs Society of the Transvaal  on 14th October  1909

Author: Frederick W Bell

Publisher: Franklin Classics Trade Press

ISBN: 9780344930379

Page: 20

View: 235

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The South African Native Problem Suggested Solution

Nevertheless, almost all South African railway extension from the seventies onwards, the opening of our diamond mines, the rough work on the mines of the Rand, as well as the manual labour at our ports, ha practically all been performed by ...

The South African Native Problem  Suggested Solution

Author: Fred; W. Bell

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9781330242773

Page: 24

View: 919

Excerpt from The South African Native Problem, Suggested Solution In a paper on the native franchise, delivered in Johannesburg last December to the Transvaal Native Affairs Society, I remarked that upon some subsequent occasion opportunity might be afforded for contributing a few ideas regarding native representation. The following reflections are offered as a contribution towards the solution of a problem which admittedly will tax to the utmost the resources of the ablest of South African statesmen. And here I may remark that though upon the former occasion I had the greatest confidence in my position, and no doubt in my own mind, in the light of all available evidence, that the white race was fully justified in withholding its democratic form of franchise from the native, in the present instance I offer the solutions which have suggested themselves with diffidence, and as no plenary declaration and solution. Regarding the two primary principles I enunciate, however, I have no doubts. The above reservations have allusion merely to matter of detail. It may be advisable before proceeding clearly to define my own attitude towards the black man in this country. After a personal experience of the native in South Africa extending since boyhood, I repudiate unhesitatingly any feeling of hostility to the black race. I have no sympathy with those who disparage the Kafir by stigmatising him as the "lazy nigger." The necessities of the native have not yet made him the slave of work that the white man has become in the Western world owing to the exactions of our individualistic and competitive systems. Nevertheless, almost all South African railway extension from the seventies onwards, the opening of our diamond mines, the rough work on the mines of the Rand, as well as the manual labour at our ports, ha practically all been performed by the native. I am not contending that this has necessarily been beneficial to South Africa; I merely relate the fact, and say that the white man in this country should be the last to revile the Kafir for lack of energy. But though appreciative of the Kafir in his natural environment, I am forced to confess that his contact with the white man in our industrial centres has been by no means wholly beneficial. Prior to the growth of mining in South Africa the contact of tho native with the white man may, as a rule, have had a wholesome and educative effect upon the former. The white man merited and retained the respect of the native, as in those days the master - generally an old-time Colonial, whether a farmer or townsman - understood the Kafir, and knew how he should be treated. But with the expansion of mining and with the large influx of undesirable Europeans, the white man and woman at the point of contact between the races, on the mines and in the towns, not only by failing to understand the native or to earn his respect, but also by lowering the white race in his eyes, have done incalculable harm. This intermingling in large centres has been injurious to both races. The white man becomes demoralised until he descends to the level of the native, and the native also becomes degraded. In his own sphere, I regard the native as a national asset. But I regard him as an asset to be nurtured, not to be squandered; as a people to be guided, and neither exploited industrially nor politically for the selfish purposes of the white man; as a people to be helped, to be saved from themselves as well as from those who use them for their own ends, and saved also from professing friends who place them in a false position, and who surely will engender grave trouble in the future, however well intended be their motives. I would aid the natural development of tho native race in every way possible along his own lines, and promote and foster native crafts and industries. But I would urge the necessity of recognising fundamental facts and principles, and ever keeping them in view. The nati...