The Marriage Plot

With devastating wit and an abiding understanding of and affection for his characters, Jeffrey Eugenides revives the motivating energies of the Novel, while creating a story so contemporary and fresh that it reads like the intimate journal ...

The Marriage Plot

Author: Jeffrey Eugenides

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429969180

Page: 416

View: 885

A New York Times Notable Book of 2011 A Publisher's Weekly Top 10 Book of 2011 A Kirkus Reviews Top 25 Best Fiction of 2011 Title One of Library Journal's Best Books of 2011 A Salon Best Fiction of 2011 title One of The Telegraph's Best Fiction Books of the Year 2011 It's the early 1980s—the country is in a deep recession, and life after college is harder than ever. In the cafés on College Hill, the wised-up kids are inhaling Derrida and listening to Talking Heads. But Madeleine Hanna, dutiful English major, is writing her senior thesis on Jane Austen and George Eliot, purveyors of the marriage plot that lies at the heart of the greatest English novels. As Madeleine tries to understand why "it became laughable to read writers like Cheever and Updike, who wrote about the suburbia Madeleine and most of her friends had grown up in, in favor of reading the Marquis de Sade, who wrote about deflowering virgins in eighteenth-century France," real life, in the form of two very different guys, intervenes. Leonard Bankhead—charismatic loner, college Darwinist, and lost Portland boy—suddenly turns up in a semiotics seminar, and soon Madeleine finds herself in a highly charged erotic and intellectual relationship with him. At the same time, her old "friend" Mitchell Grammaticus—who's been reading Christian mysticism and generally acting strange—resurfaces, obsessed with the idea that Madeleine is destined to be his mate. Over the next year, as the members of the triangle in this amazing, spellbinding novel graduate from college and enter the real world, events force them to reevaluate everything they learned in school. Leonard and Madeleine move to a biology Laboratory on Cape Cod, but can't escape the secret responsible for Leonard's seemingly inexhaustible energy and plunging moods. And Mitchell, traveling around the world to get Madeleine out of his mind, finds himself face-to-face with ultimate questions about the meaning of life, the existence of God, and the true nature of love. Are the great love stories of the nineteenth century dead? Or can there be a new story, written for today and alive to the realities of feminism, sexual freedom, prenups, and divorce? With devastating wit and an abiding understanding of and affection for his characters, Jeffrey Eugenides revives the motivating energies of the Novel, while creating a story so contemporary and fresh that it reads like the intimate journal of our own lives.

The Marriage Plot

Madeleine Hanna breaks out of her straight-and-narrow mold when she falls in love with charismatic loner Leonard Bankhead, while at the same time an old friend of hers resurfaces, obsessed with the idea that Madeleine is his destiny.

The Marriage Plot

Author: Jeffrey Eugenides

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780374533250

Page: 406

View: 338

Madeleine Hanna breaks out of her straight-and-narrow mold when she falls in love with charismatic loner Leonard Bankhead, while at the same time an old friend of hers resurfaces, obsessed with the idea that Madeleine is his destiny.

Wunschloses Ungl ck

This short novel by Peter Handke is the biography of the narrator's mother.

Wunschloses Ungl  ck

Author: Peter Handke

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719034916

Page: 125

View: 297

This short novel by Peter Handke is the biography of the narrator's mother. It is set against the backdrop of events in Austrian history, with emphasis upon the Anschluss of 1938 and the resulting hardships endured by rural women. These pressures, in the case of the narrator's mother, resulted in her suicide.

The Marriage Plot

But Madeleine Hanna, dutiful English major, is writing her senior thesis on Jane Austen and George Eliot, purveyors of the marriage plot that lies at the heart of the greatest English novels.

The Marriage Plot

Author: Jeffrey Eugenides

Publisher: Picador

ISBN: 9781250014764

Page: 416

View: 151

A National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist Named a Best Book of the Year by The New York Times Book Review • NPR • The New Republic • Salon • The Seattle Times • Houston Chronicle • The Miami Herald • Publisher's Weekly "Remind[s] us with uncommon understanding what it is to be young and idealistic, in pursuit of true love, and in love with books and ideas."—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times "A grand romance in the Austen tradition."—USA Today Are the great love stories of the nineteenth century dead? Or can there be a new story, written for today and alive to the realities of feminism, sexual freedom, prenups, and divorce? It's the early 1980s. In American colleges, the wised-up kids are inhaling Derrida and listening to Talking Heads. But Madeleine Hanna, dutiful English major, is writing her senior thesis on Jane Austen and George Eliot, purveyors of the marriage plot that lies at the heart of the greatest English novels. As Madeleine studies the age-old motivations of the human heart, real life, in the form of two very different guys, intervenes---the charismatic and intense Leonard Bankhead, and her old friend the mystically inclined Mitchell Grammaticus. As all three of them face life in the real world they will have to reevaluate everything they have learned. Jeffrey Eugenides creates a new kind of contemporary love story in "his most powerful novel yet" (Newsweek).

The Marriage of Minds

Finally, it demonstrates how both the form of the Victorian novel and the experience supposed to result from that form were implicated in ongoing debates about the nature, purpose, and law of marriage.

The Marriage of Minds

Author: Rachel Ablow

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804754668

Page: 231

View: 785

The Marriage of Minds examines the implications of the common Victorian claim that novel reading can achieve the psychic, ethical, and affective benefits also commonly associated with sympathy in married life. Through close readings of canonical texts in relation to the histories of sympathy, marriage, and reading, The Marriage of Minds begins to fill a long-standing gap between eighteenth-century philosophical notions of sympathy and twentieth-century psychoanalytic concepts of identification. It examines the wide variety of ways in which novels were understood to educate or reform readers in the mid-nineteenth century. Finally, it demonstrates how both the form of the Victorian novel and the experience supposed to result from that form were implicated in ongoing debates about the nature, purpose, and law of marriage.

The Origins of the English Marriage Plot

This book will be of interest to students and researchers of eighteenth and early nineteenth-century English literature and culture as well as feminist literary history.

The Origins of the English Marriage Plot

Author: Lisa O'Connell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108485685

Page: 318

View: 461

Examines how and why marriage plots became the English novel's most popular form in the eighteenth century. This book will be of interest to students and researchers of eighteenth and early nineteenth-century English literature and culture as well as feminist literary history.

The Marriage Plot

In The Marriage Plot, Naomi Seidman considers the evolution of Jewish love and marriage though the literature that provided Jews with a sentimental education, highlighting a persistent ambivalence in the Jewish adoption of European romantic ...

The Marriage Plot

Author: Naomi Seidman

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780804798433

Page: 368

View: 807

For nineteenth-century Eastern European Jews, modernization entailed the abandonment of arranged marriage in favor of the "love match." Romantic novels taught Jewish readers the rules of romance and the choreography of courtship. But because these new conceptions of romance were rooted in the Christian and chivalric traditions, the Jewish embrace of "the love religion" was always partial. In The Marriage Plot, Naomi Seidman considers the evolution of Jewish love and marriage though the literature that provided Jews with a sentimental education and highlights a persistent ambivalence in the Jewish adoption of romantic ideologies. Nineteenth-century Hebrew and Yiddish literature tempered romantic love with the claims of family and community, and treated the rules of gender complementarity as comedic fodder. Twentieth-century Jewish writers turned back to tradition, finding pleasures in matchmaking, intergenerational ties, and sexual segregation. In the modern Jewish voices of Sigmund Freud, Erica Jong, Philip Roth, and Tony Kushner, traditional Jewish attitudes and approaches to sex, marriage, and gender find surprising echoes. The Jewish heretical challenge to the European romantic sublime has become the central sexual ideology of our time.

A Marriage Plot

A. Marriage. Plot. by. Hollis. Shiloh. "Jeremy, if you aren't married by next month,
you realize the crown will pass to your cousin." The councilor spoke in an even
tone, but the look in his eyes was frightened—as well it might be. He was only too
 ...

A Marriage Plot

Author: Hollis Shiloh

Publisher: Spare Words Press

ISBN:

Page:

View: 853

Prince Jeremy must marry within the month or lose the throne. He would much rather not be king, but if he must, then he will go about it in the least convenient way possible for the council: holding an open call for a man to marry. Not everything is as it seems, and there are plans within plans. But sometimes even princes get caught in their own clever little plots. 15,000 words A "Marrying Men" story. These pseudo-historical tales feature men marrying one another in various worlds and ways. Happy ending are to be expected.

Fresh Complaint

The stories in Fresh Complaint explore equally rich—and intriguing—territory.

Fresh Complaint

Author: Jeffrey Eugenides

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374717389

Page: 304

View: 564

The first collection of short fiction from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jeffrey Eugenides Jeffrey Eugenides’s bestselling novels have shown him to be an astute observer of the crises of adolescence, self-discovery, family love, and what it means to be American in our times. The stories in Fresh Complaint explore equally rich—and intriguing—territory. Ranging from the bitingly reproductive antics of “Baster” to the dreamy, moving account of a young traveler’s search for enlightenment in “Air Mail” (selected by Annie Proulx for Best American Short Stories), this collection presents characters in the midst of personal and national emergencies. We meet a failed poet who, envious of other people’s wealth during the real-estate bubble, becomes an embezzler; a clavichordist whose dreams of art founder under the obligations of marriage and fatherhood; and, in “Fresh Complaint,” a high school student whose wish to escape the strictures of her immigrant family lead her to a drastic decision that upends the life of a middle-aged British physicist. Narratively compelling, beautifully written, and packed with a density of ideas despite their fluid grace, these stories chart the development and maturation of a major American writer.

Dickens and the Rise of Divorce

Questioning a literary history that, since Ian Watt's Rise of the Novel, has privileged the courtship plot, Kelly Hager proposes an equally powerful but overlooked narrative focusing on the failed marriage.

Dickens and the Rise of Divorce

Author: Kelly Hager

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317151186

Page: 216

View: 176

Questioning a literary history that, since Ian Watt's Rise of the Novel, has privileged the courtship plot, Kelly Hager proposes an equally powerful but overlooked narrative focusing on the failed marriage. Hager maps the legal history of marriage and divorce, providing crucial background as she reveals the prevalence of the failed-marriage plot in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British novels. Dickens's novels emerge as representative case studies in their preoccupations with the disintegration of marriage, the far-reaching and disastrous effects of the doctrine of coverture, and the comic, spectacular, and monstrous possibilities afforded by the failed-marriage plot. Setting his narratives alongside the writings of liberal reformers like John Stuart Mill and the seemingly conservative agendas of Caroline Norton, Eliza Lynn Linton, and Sarah Stickney Ellis, Hager also offers a more contextualized account of the competing strands of the Woman Question. In the course of her revisionist readings of Dickens's novels, Hager uncovers a Dickens who is neither the conservative agent of the patriarchy nor a novelistic Jeremy Bentham, and reveals that tipping the marriage plot on its head forces us to adjust our understanding of the complexities of Victorian proto-feminism.

The Nun in the Garret

"The Nun in the Garret" engages the topic of dissent, both in the sense that it dissents from the theory of the secular novel, and is informed by the Dissenting faiths of Victorian England and their compatibility with a scriptural ...

The Nun in the Garret

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 430

View: 110

"The Nun in the Garret" engages the topic of dissent, both in the sense that it dissents from the theory of the secular novel, and is informed by the Dissenting faiths of Victorian England and their compatibility with a scriptural hermeneutics that privileges questioning. I observe how religion and form intersect in the novel through this lens of dissent, arguing that the realist novel consistently uses the marriage plot as a staging ground that pits civil society against privately held religious belief. As a means of exploring this formal concern, I employ a way of reading I've termed "faithful reading," which does not treat religion's influence on the marriage plot and, hence, the novel as something symptomatic or repressed, but as something that is openly and even didactically treated. Faithful reading is a germ of a way of looking at the text that revives hermeneutics's context by acknowledging its religious roots and looking at the way these roots can assist readers in pursuing the problems or liabilities of presentism; restoring this context is a necessary part of acknowledging criticism's history of asking questions of texts, of dissenting itself. Faithful reading suggests that religion is present, structuring, and crucial to any understanding of the realist novel, and that any repression of religion is most commonly found in critical approaches to novels, not the novels themselves. The methodology thus locates moments of religious dissent, and uses the metaphors and forms in these moments as maps to construct newly resonant readings of the relationship between the novel and religion. As I examine the way that religion thus influences the marriage plot, I explore an alternate reading of a canonical archive of the nineteenth-century novel, locating realist texts where religion and the marriage plot are inextricably intertwined, including Jane Austen's Mansfield Park, Charlotte Brontë's Villette, Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South, Wilkie Collins's The Moonstone, and Mrs. Humphry Ward's Robert Elsmere.

The Food Plot in the Nineteenth Century British Novel

This book is about food, eating, and appetite in the nineteenth-century British novel.

The Food Plot in the Nineteenth Century British Novel

Author: Michael Parrish Lee

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137499389

Page: 246

View: 554

This book is about food, eating, and appetite in the nineteenth-century British novel. While much novel criticism has focused on the marriage plot, this book revises the history and theory of the novel, uncovering the “food plot” against which the marriage plot and modern subjectivity take shape. With the emergence of Malthusian population theory and its unsettling links between sexuality and the food supply, the British novel became animated by the tension between the marriage plot and the food plot. Charting the shifting relationship between these plots, from Jane Austen’s polite meals to Bram Stoker’s bloodthirsty vampires, this book sheds new light on some of the best-know works of nineteenth-century literature and pushes forward understandings of narrative, literary character, biopolitics, and the novel as a form. From Austen to Zombies, Michael Parrish Lee explores how the food plot conflicts with the marriage plot in nineteenth-century literature and beyond, and how appetite keeps rising up against taste and intellect. Lee’s book will be of interest to Victorianists, genre theorists, Food Studies, and theorists of bare life and biopolitics. - Regenia Gagnier, Professor of English, University of Exeter In The Food Plot Michael Lee engages recent and classic scholarship and brings fresh and provocative readings to well worked literary critical ground. Drawing upon narrative theory, character study, theories of sexuality, and political economy, Professor Lee develops a refreshing and satisfyingly deep new reading of canonical novels as he develops the concept of the food plot. The Food Plot should be of interest to specialists in the novel and food studies, as well as students and general readers. - Professor April Bullock, California State University, Fullerton, USA