The Idea of Justice

Presents an analysis of what justice is, the transcendental theory of justice and its drawbacks, and a persuasive argument for a comparative perspective on justice that can guide us in the choice between alternatives.

The Idea of Justice

Author: Amartya Sen

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674060474

Page: 467

View: 279

Presents an analysis of what justice is, the transcendental theory of justice and its drawbacks, and a persuasive argument for a comparative perspective on justice that can guide us in the choice between alternatives.

A Theory of Justice

Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawls's view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawls's theory refers to the first edition.

A Theory of Justice

Author: John RAWLS

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674042603

Page: 623

View: 424

Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawls's view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawls's theory refers to the first edition. This reissue makes the first edition once again available for scholars and serious students of Rawls's work.

Theories of Justice

Though the first book of a trilogy, Theories of Justice stands alone and constitutes a major contribution to the debate about social justice that began in 1971 with Rawls's A Theory of Justice.

Theories of Justice

Author: Brian Barry

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520076495

Page: 443

View: 629

What is social justice? In Theories of Justice Brian Barry provides a systematic and detailed analysis of two kinds of answers. One is that justice arises from a sense of the advantage to everyone of having constraints on the pursuit of self-interest. The other answer connects the idea of justice with that of impartiality. Though the first book of a trilogy, Theories of Justice stands alone and constitutes a major contribution to the debate about social justice that began in 1971 with Rawls's A Theory of Justice.

The Idea of Justice in Literature

This newly developed field should aim at two major goals, first, to investigate the meaning of law in a social context by questioning how the characters appearing in literary works understand and behave themselves to the law (law in ...

The Idea of Justice in Literature

Author: Hiroshi Kabashima

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3658219963

Page: 214

View: 621

The theme arises from the legal-academic movement "Law and Literature". This newly developed field should aim at two major goals, first, to investigate the meaning of law in a social context by questioning how the characters appearing in literary works understand and behave themselves to the law (law in literature), and second, to find out a theoretical solution of the methodological question whether and to what extent the legal text can be interpreted objectively in comparison with the question how literary works should be interpreted (law as literature). The subject of justice and injustice has been covered not only in treatises of law and philosophy, but also in many works of literature: On the one hand, poets and writers have been outraged at the social conditions of their time. On the other hand, some of them have also contributed fundamental reflections on the idea of justice itself.

Justice as Fairness

This book originated as lectures for a course on political philosophy that Rawls taught regularly at Harvard in the 1980s.

Justice as Fairness

Author: John Rawls

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674005105

Page: 214

View: 940

This book originated as lectures for a course on political philosophy that Rawls taught regularly at Harvard in the 1980s. In time the lectures became a restatement of his theory of justice as fairness, revised in light of his more recent papers and his treatise Political Liberalism (1993). As Rawls writes in the preface, the restatement presents "in one place an account of justice as fairness as I now see it, drawing on all [my previous] works." He offers a broad overview of his main lines of thought and also explores specific issues never before addressed in any of his writings. Rawls is well aware that since the publication of A Theory of Justice in 1971, American society has moved farther away from the idea of justice as fairness. Yet his ideas retain their power and relevance to debates in a pluralistic society about the meaning and theoretical viability of liberalism. This book demonstrates that moral clarity can be achieved even when a collective commitment to justice is uncertain.

The Theory of Justice

In addition to Stammler's text, the volume includes the translator's introduction which outlines the basis of Stammler's theory, an appendix which contains an essay on Stammler's critical system by Francois Geny and "Stammler and his ...

The Theory of Justice

Author: Rudolf Stammler

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 158477066X

Page: 591

View: 738

Here the noted German philosopher disputes the historical and natural schools of jurisprudence and advocates a philosophical approach to law. In addition to Stammler's text, the volume includes the translator's introduction which outlines the basis of Stammler's theory, an appendix which contains an essay on Stammler's critical system by Francois Geny and "Stammler and his Critics" by John C.H. Wu.

The Philosophy of Moral Development

Examines the theories of Socrates, Kant, Dewey, Piaget, and others to explore the implications of Socrates' question "what is a virtuous man, and what is a virtuous school and society which educates virtuous men."

The Philosophy of Moral Development

Author: Lawrence Kohlberg

Publisher: San Francisco : Harper & Row

ISBN:

Page: 441

View: 784

Examines the theories of Socrates, Kant, Dewey, Piaget, and others to explore the implications of Socrates' question "what is a virtuous man, and what is a virtuous school and society which educates virtuous men."

The Idea of Justice in Political Economy

That is, Schmoller was first and foremost a social reformer. As such, Schmoller's influence extended throughout Europe, to the Progressive movement in the United States, and to social reformers in Meiji Japan.

The Idea of Justice in Political Economy

Author: Gustav Schmoller

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781974412983

Page: 26

View: 520

Schmoller's primarily inductive approach, requesting careful study, comparative in time and space, of economic performance and phenomena generally, his focus on the evolution of economic processes and institutions, and his insistence on the cultural specificity of economics and the centrality of values in shaping economic exchanges stand in stark contrast to some classical and most neoclassical economists, so that he and his school fell out of the mainstream of economics by the 1930s, being replaced in Germany by the successor Freiburg school. However, it is often overlooked that Schmoller's primary preoccupation in his lifetime was not with economic method but with economic and social policy to address the challenges posed by rapid industrialization and urbanization. That is, Schmoller was first and foremost a social reformer. As such, Schmoller's influence extended throughout Europe, to the Progressive movement in the United States, and to social reformers in Meiji Japan.

John Rawls

This is a short, accessible introduction to John Rawls' thought and gives a thorough and concise presentation of the main outlines of Rawls' theory as well as drawing links between Rawl's enterprise and other important positions in moral ...

John Rawls

Author: Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195136365

Page: 228

View: 101

This is a short, accessible introduction to John Rawls' thought and gives a thorough and concise presentation of the main outlines of Rawls' theory as well as drawing links between Rawls' enterprise and other important positions in moral and political philosophy.

The Concept of Justice and Equality

What is the more plausible approach to social justice? This work compares both approaches and aims to defend Cohen’s position in the light of two considerations.

The Concept of Justice and Equality

Author: Eliane Saadé

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110448904

Page: 235

View: 219

Unless considered on a practical level, where a precise distribution of social goods is chosen, John Rawls’s and Gerald Cohen’s approaches to social justice cannot be complementary. Their disagreement about justice and its principles calls for a choice, which opts either for the Rawlsian theory or for the Cohenian one. What is the more plausible approach to social justice? This work compares both approaches and aims to defend Cohen’s position in the light of two considerations. It answers the philosophical question about the analysis of the idea of justice, which puts the virtue of justice in its philosophical context. It, however, presents a method everyone can apply in order to arrive at the fundamental principles of justice by employing the power of reason. An analysis of the concept of justice based on the power of reason should seek to uncover the ultimate nature of justice, which is independent of facts and of other virtues. Once exposed, the understanding of justice arrived at should inform social institutions and determine people’s daily decisions. A just society is therefore a society where just persons and just institutions exhibit the virtue of justice.

Kant s Theory of Justice

'Rosen covers so much of the Kantian corpus so succinctly that the book is almost a handbook... A nice addition to all philosophy collections.' --Choice

Kant s Theory of Justice

Author: Allen D. Rosen

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801480386

Page: 237

View: 347

Following the tradition of classical liberalism, Kant's political philosophy and theory of justice focus on the relation between individual freedom, as the central value of political life, and the state, whose primary normative function is both to restrain and protect individual liberty. In this accessible interpretation of Kant's political philosophy, Allen D. Rosen focuses on the relation among justice, political authority (the state), and individual liberty. He offers interpretations of the ethical bases of Kant's view of justice, of the structure of his taxonomy of duties, and of his understanding of social welfare legislation.

Concepts of Justice

Lucid and stimulating, this work can be enjoyed by anyone interested in moral and political thought, even by those with little to no knowledge of political theory or philosophy.

Concepts of Justice

Author: David Daiches Raphael

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199245711

Page: 256

View: 784

The eminent philosopher D. D. Raphael presents the culmination of a lifetime's study of the development of the idea of justice, from the ancient world to the late twentieth century. His aim is not just historical but philosophical: to illuminate our understanding of justice. His original approach to the subject draws not only on classic texts by such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Mill, and Rawls, but also on the Bible and Greek tragedy, and some neglected but important thinkers in the modern era. Lucid and stimulating, Concepts of Justice can be enjoyed by anyone interested in moral and political thought.

The Law of Peoples

This book consists of two parts: the essay "The Idea of Public Reason Revisited," first published in 1997, and "The Law of Peoples," a major reworking of a much shorter article by the same name published in 1993.

The Law of Peoples

Author: John Rawls

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674005426

Page: 199

View: 939

This book consists of two parts: the essay "The Idea of Public Reason Revisited," first published in 1997, and "The Law of Peoples," a major reworking of a much shorter article by the same name published in 1993. Taken together, they are the culmination of more than fifty years of reflection on liberalism and on some of the most pressing problems of our times by John Rawls. "The Idea of Public Reason Revisited" explains why the constraints of public reason, a concept first discussed in Political Liberalism (1993), are ones that holders of both religious and non-religious comprehensive views can reasonably endorse. It is Rawls's most detailed account of how a modern constitutional democracy, based on a liberal political conception, could and would be viewed as legitimate by reasonable citizens who on religious, philosophical, or moral grounds do not themselves accept a liberal comprehensive doctrine--such as that of Kant, or Mill, or Rawls's own "Justice as Fairness," presented in A Theory of Justice (1971). The Law of Peoples extends the idea of a social contract to the Society of Peoples and lays out the general principles that can and should be accepted by both liberal and non-liberal societies as the standard for regulating their behavior toward one another. In particular, it draws a crucial distinction between basic human rights and the rights of each citizen of a liberal constitutional democracy. It explores the terms under which such a society may appropriately wage war against an "outlaw society," and discusses the moral grounds for rendering assistance to non-liberal societies burdened by unfavorable political and economic conditions.

Justice

justice there predominates the idea of inequality , while the idea of equality is
inconspicuous , the inequality refers , not to the natural achievement of greater
rewards by greater merits , but to the artificial apportionment of greater rewards to
 ...

Justice

Author: Herbert Spencer

Publisher: New York, Appleton

ISBN:

Page: 291

View: 757

Justice

Introducing the concept of justice in contemporary political theory, this title outlines all the main theories and details the theories advanced by major thinkers such as Rawls, Sen, Friedman, Nozick and Fraser.

Justice

Author: Harry Brighouse

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 0745625967

Page: 180

View: 127

Introducing the concept of justice in contemporary political theory, this title outlines all the main theories and details the theories advanced by major thinkers such as Rawls, Sen, Friedman, Nozick and Fraser. It connects philosophical theories to real world issues and discusses the slogan 'the personal is political'

Poverty Justice and Western Political Thought

This book will benefit political theorists and philosophers interested in the history of political thought, poverty, or distributive justice, as well as non-theorists.

Poverty  Justice  and Western Political Thought

Author: Sharon K. Vaughan

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739139428

Page: 234

View: 154

The number of people who live in poverty has always far exceeded the number who do not. The normative question of how governments ought to treat the poor goes to the heart of the idea of justice and thus it is an essential element of political theory. Yet, there has been no formal study of the treatment of poverty in Western political thought. The chapters ofPoverty, Justice, and Western Political Thought include an analysis of the main arguments of Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Rousseau, Smith, Mill, Tocqueville, Hegel, Marx, Rawls, and Nozick about the causes, effects, and solutions to the problem of poverty and how their treatments of poverty relate to the idea of a just society. This book asks: What is the relationship between poverty and justice in the state? If we are to understand the relationship between the poor and the idea of a just state in the tradition of Western political thought, then we must be able to recognize how these theorists' definitions, assumptions, and conclusions about poverty contribute to or detract from the idea of justice. At the core of this work is the claim that the demands of justice necessarily entail that the political theorist engage with the problem of poverty, with the goal being to suggest some thoughtful and reasonable approaches to the problem. Poverty, Justice, and Western Political Thought demonstrates that historical analysis and reconstruction of the treatment of poverty is critical because we are part of a historical community. Rather than being artifacts of scholarship, philosophical debates and ideas that are hundreds and thousands of years old continue to be relevant today because they are part of the foundation for society's beliefs about who the poor are, why they are poor, and what responsibility, if any, society has to them. This book will benefit political theorists and philosophers interested in the history of political thought, poverty, or distributive justice, as well as non-theorists.

Reading Rawls

First published in 1975, this collection includes many of the best critical responses to John Rawls' A Theory of Justice, and the editor has elected to reissue the book without making any substitutions.

Reading Rawls

Author: Norman Daniels

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804715034

Page: 353

View: 747

First published in 1975, this collection includes many of the best critical responses to John Rawls' A Theory of Justice, and the editor has elected to reissue the book without making any substitutions. As he argues in his new preface, the variety of issues raise in the original papers has been a major part of the book's appeal. He also acknowledges that no modest revision of this book could pretend to respond adequately to the considerable elaboration and evolution of Rawls' theory in the last fifteen years. Political philosophy has been one of the most exciting areas of philosophical activity in the years since A Theory of Justice, and much of that activity has been a response to Rawls' work. In his preface, the editor suggests how some of the insights and criticisms contained in the collection have had a bearing on developments in Rawls' theory and in political philosophy more generally, and that fresh reading of each of them reveals additional important points that have not yet received adequate attention. The contributors are: Benjamin Barber, Norman Daniels, Gerald Dworkin, Ronald Dworkin, Joel Feinberg, Milton Fisk, R.M. Hare, H.L.A. Hart, David Lyons, Frank Michelman, Richard Miller, Thomas Nagel, T.M. Scanlon, and A.K. Sen.

Natural Law and Justice

In this part of the book, Weinreb considers the theories of justice of Rawls and Nozick as well as the communitarian theory of Maclntyre and Sandel.

Natural Law and Justice

Author: Lloyd L. Weinreb

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674604261

Page: 320

View: 864

"Human beings are a part of nature and apart from it." The argument of Natural Law and Justice is that the philosophy of natural law and contemporary theories about the nature of justice are both efforts to make sense of the fundamental paradox of human experience: individual freedom and responsibility in a causally determined universe. Professor Weinreb restores the original understanding of natural law as a philosophy about the place of humankind in nature. He traces the natural law tradition from its origins in Greek speculation through its classic Christian statement by Thomas Aquinas. He goes on to show how the social contract theorists adapted the idea of natural law to provide for political obligation in civil society and how the idea was transformed in Kant's account of human freedom. He brings the historical narrative down to the present with a discussion of the contemporary debate between natural law and legal positivism, including particularly the natural law theories of Finnis, Richards, and Dworkin. Professor Weinreb then adopts the approach of modern political philosophy to develop the idea of justice as a union of the distinct ideas of desert and entitlement. He shows liberty and equality to be the political analogues of desert and entitlement and both pairs to be the normative equivalents of freedom and cause. In this part of the book, Weinreb considers the theories of justice of Rawls and Nozick as well as the communitarian theory of Maclntyre and Sandel. The conclusion brings the debates about natural law and justice together, as parallel efforts to understand the human condition. This original contribution to legal philosophy will be especially appreciated by scholars, teachers, and students in the fields of political philosophy, legal philosophy, and the law generally.