The Gettysburg Campaign

This book contends that Gettyburg was a crucial Union victory, primarily because of the effective leadership of Union forces—not, as has often been said, only because the North was the beneficiary of Lee's mistakes.

The Gettysburg Campaign

Author: Edwin B. Coddington

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684845695

Page: 866

View: 244

The Battle of Gettyburg remains one of the most controversial military actions in America's history, and one of the most studied. Professor Coddington's is an analysis not only of the battle proper, but of the actions of both Union and Confederate armies for the six months prior to the battle and the factors affecting General Meade’s decision not to pursue the retreating Confederate forces. This book contends that Gettyburg was a crucial Union victory, primarily because of the effective leadership of Union forces—not, as has often been said, only because the North was the beneficiary of Lee's mistakes.

The Gettysburg Campaign in Numbers and Losses

The raw data provided in The Gettysburg Campaign in Numbers and Losses should stimulate more detailed analysis of when, how, and why infantry, artillery and cavalry units sustained casualties in this campaign... this is a must-have book for ...

The Gettysburg Campaign in Numbers and Losses

Author: J. David Petruzzi

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781611210804

Page: 210

View: 864

The Gettysburg Campaign in Numbers and Losses is a full-color, master work decades in the making. Presented for the first time in print are comprehensive orders of battle for more than three dozen engagements both large and small waged during the five weeks of the Gettysburg Campaign (June 9 - July 14, 1863). Each presentation includes a synopsis of the engagement, photos of the commanders, an original full page map of the fighting, an order of battle with numbers and losses (including killed, wounded, captured, and missing), charts and graphs of relative strengths and losses, a conclusion of how the fighting affected each side and the course of the campaign, and a brief suggested reading list. J. David Petruzzi and Steven Stanley use a staggering array of primary resources to compile the text and craft the original maps, including the Official Records, soldier letters and diaries, period newspapers, regimental histories, reminiscences, muster rolls, and other published and unpublished sources. For the first time students of the campaign can turn page-by-page to read, visualize, and understand blow-by-blow how the unfolding action affected the individual corps, divisions, brigades, and regiments, and by extension influenced decision-making at the highest levels of command. The Gettysburg Campaign in Numbers and Losses: Synopses, Orders of Battle, Strengths, Casualties, and Maps, June 9 - July 14, 1863 is a stunning original presentation destined to become a constant companion for anyone interested in this always fascinating slice of Civil War history. About the Authors: J. David Petruzzi is an award-winning Civil War cavalry historian. He is the author of many articles for a wide variety of publications, and has written or co-authored several books including: (with Eric Wittenberg) Plenty of Blame to Go Around: Jeb Stuart's Controversial Ride to Gettysburg (Savas Beatie, 2006); (with Wittenberg and Michael F. Nugent) One Continuous Fight: The Retreat from Gettysburg and the Pursuit of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, July 4-14, 1863 (Savas Beatie, 2008); and (with Steven Stanley) The Complete Gettysburg Guide: Walking and Driving Tours of the Battlefield, Town, Cemeteries, Field Hospital Sites, and other Topics of Historical Interest (Savas Beatie, 2009), winner of the U.S. Army Historical Foundation's 2009 Distinguished Writing Award, Reference Category. With Stanley, he also produced The Complete Gettysburg Guide: Audio Driving and Walking Tour, Volume One: The Battlefield (Savas Beatie, 2010). Steven Stanley lives in Gettysburg and is a graphic artist specializing in historical map design and battlefield photography. His maps, considered among the best in historical cartography, have been a longtime staple of the Civil War Trust and have helped raise millions of dollars for the Trust through their preservation appeals and interpretation projects. Steve's maps have appeared in a wide variety of publications. Co-authored by J. David Petruzzi, Steve produced the maps and the complete design of The Complete Gettysburg Guide: Walking and Driving Tours of the Battlefield, Town, Cemeteries, Field Hospital Sites, and other Topics of Historical Interest (Savas Beatie, 2009), the winner of the U.S. Army Historical Foundation's 2009 Distinguished Writing Award, Reference Category, as well as The Complete Gettysburg Guide: Audio Driving and Walking Tour, Volume One: The Battlefield (Savas Beatie, 2010). REVIEWS Veteran Gettysburg authors Petruzzi and Stanley (The Complete Gettysburg Guide) here provide a wealth of statistical information on the campaign. They used every source available to compile the most detailed presentation yet possible of the casualties suffered between June 9 and July 14, 1863. The book's 20 chapters provide summaries of over 40 battles, skirmishes, and sieges related to operations around Gettysburg. Included are itemized orders of battle for each engagement, charts showing the strength and losses of each side broken down by unit type, and maps of geography and maneuvers. Summaries of each skirmish or battle analyze casualties suffered and the impact of such losses on subsequent engagements.VERDICT The authors have met their stated purpose well. Anyone interested in the Gettysburg campaign, either in terms of the troops who served or the various battles and skirmishes related to it, should find this a useful source. Civil War historians will appreciate it as a valuable reference tool.--Matthew Wayman, Pennsylvania State Univ. Lib., Schuylkill Haven "J. David Petruzzi and Steven Stanley have produced a brilliant, cutting-edge book on the Gettysburg Campaign... Petruzzi's decades of research and Stanley's cartographic skills have been combined into a single volume that constitutes the authoritative source on Gettysburg casualty information and provides lucid maps of most of the Gettysburg Campaign... The raw data provided in The Gettysburg Campaign in Numbers and Losses should stimulate more detailed analysis of when, how, and why infantry, artillery and cavalry units sustained casualties in this campaign... this is a must-have book for anyone with a serious interest in the Gettysburg Campaign or the study of casualties in the Civil War. It is very highly recommended." - Civil War News "Anyone interested in the Gettysburg campaign, either in terms of the troops who served or the various battles and skirmishes related to it, should find this a useful source. Civil War historians will appreciate it as a valuable reference tool." - Library Journal "This volume is an indispensable addition to any Gettysburg reference collection. This is one of those rare books that will be equally useful to both amateur historians, who will find it an accessible guide, and seasoned scholars, who will wrestle with its implications for decades. When I am not carting it out to the battlefield, it will occupy a prominent place in my personal library." - Civil War Monitor

African Americans and the Gettysburg Campaign

The Gettysburg Gospel: the Lincoln Speech That Nobody Knows by Gabor Boritt (Simon & Schuster Lincoln Library, 2008) / 432 pages / 6 x 9 / $28.00 (cloth); $16.00 (paper) PubAlley: (cloth): 1,989 units; $55,709.27; (paper): 393 units; $6,291 ...

African Americans and the Gettysburg Campaign

Author: James M. Paradis

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810883368

Page: 182

View: 725

The Gettysburg Gospel: the Lincoln Speech That Nobody Knows by Gabor Boritt (Simon & Schuster Lincoln Library, 2008) / 432 pages / 6 x 9 / $28.00 (cloth); $16.00 (paper) PubAlley: (cloth): 1,989 units; $55,709.27; (paper): 393 units; $6,291.43 WorldCat: 1152 records The Colors of Courage: Gettysburg's Hidden History: Immigrants, Women, and African-Americans in the Civil War's Defining Battle by Margaret S. Creighton (Basic Books, 2006) / 360 pages / 6 x 9 / $26.00 (cloth); $17.50 (paper) PubAlley: (cloth): 1,466 units; $38,110.30; (paper): 291 units; $5,091.95 WorldCat: 742 records An African American History of the Civil War in Hampton Roads (VA) by Cassandra Newby-Alexander (The History Press, 2010) / 128 pages / 5.5 x 8.5 / $19.99 (paper) PubAlley: (paper): 85 units; $1,709.77 WorldCat: 72 records

Maps of Gettysburg

Serious students of the battle will appreciate the extensive and authoritative endnotes. They will also want to bring the book along on their trips to the battlefield.

Maps of Gettysburg

Author: Bradley M. Gottfried

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 363

View: 950

More academic and photographic accounts on the battle of Gettysburg exist than for all other battles of the Civil War combined--and for good reason. The three-days of maneuver, attack, and counterattack consisted of literally scores of encounters, from corps-size actions to small unit engagements. Despite all its coverage, Gettysburg remains one of the most complex and difficult to understand battles of the war. The Maps of Gettysburg: An Atlas of the Gettysburg Campaign, June 3 - July 13, 1863, by Bradley Gottfried offers a unique approach to the study of this multifaceted engagement. The Maps of Gettysburg plows new ground in the study of the campaign by breaking down the entire campaign in 140 detailed original maps. These cartographic originals bore down to the regimental level, and offer Civil Warriors a unique and fascinating approach to studying the always climactic battle of the war. The Maps of Gettysburg offers thirty "action-sections" comprising the entire campaign. These include the march to and from the battlefield, and virtually every significant event in between. Gottfrieds original maps (from two to as many as twenty) enrich each "action-section." Keyed to each piece of cartography is detailed text that includes hundreds of soldiers quotes that make the Gettysburg story come alive. This presentation allows readers to easily and quickly find a map and text on virtually any portion of the campaign, from the cavalry drama at Brandy Station on June 9, to the last Confederate withdrawal of troops across the Potomac River on July 15, 1863. Serious students of the battle will appreciate the extensive and authoritative endnotes. They will also want to bring the book along on their trips to the battlefield. Perfect for the easy chair or for stomping the hallowed ground of Gettysburg, The Maps of Gettysburg promises to be a seminal work that belongs on the bookshelf of every serious and casual student of the battle.

Imboden s Brigade in the Gettysburg Campaign

Steve French's Imboden's Brigade in the Gettysburg Campaign, the winner of the 2008 Bachelder-Coddington Award, the Gettysburg Civil War Round Table Book Award, and the Jefferson Davis Historical Gold Medal, is the first full-length book to ...

Imboden s Brigade in the Gettysburg Campaign

Author: Steve French

Publisher: Savas Publishing

ISBN: 1940669022

Page: 262

View: 788

John Daniel Imboden carved out one of the most unique and fascinating careers of the Civil War. In 1859, the lawyer and politician was commissioned a captain in the Staunton (Va.) Artillery. When war broke out in 1861, he served with his battery at Harpers Ferry and First Manassas. In 1862, Imboden raised the 1st Virginia Partisan Rangers and fought in Stonewall Jackson's famed Shenandoah Valley Campaign. A promotion to brigadier general followed in early 1863, as did daring cavalry raids. Imboden served until the end of the war, but it was his service during the Gettysburg Campaign for which he is best remembered. Steve French's Imboden's Brigade in the Gettysburg Campaign, the winner of the 2008 Bachelder-Coddington Award, the Gettysburg Civil War Round Table Book Award, and the Jefferson Davis Historical Gold Medal, is the first full-length book to tell the story of the general's "finest hour." The brigadier and his 1400-man Northwestern Virginia brigade, which included artillery, infantry and cavalry, spent most of the early days of the campaign raiding along the B&O Railroad in western Virginia, before guarding ammunition and supply trains in the rear of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia during the three-day (July 1-3, 1863) Battle of Gettysburg. The sharp Confederate defeat forced a hasty retreat , and Lee put Imboden in charge of escorting the wagons filled with thousands of wounded safely back to Virginia. After a harrowing journey beset by heavy rain and attacks by roving bands of Union cavalry, Imboden's seventeen-mile-long "wagon train of misery" finally reached Williamsport, Maryland, where the flooding Potomac River trapped them. On July 5-6, Imboden established a strong defensive position on a ridge outside of town and cobbled together a force of soldiers that included his own brigade, various Confederate units on their way to join the army, 600 teamsters, many walking wounded and over twenty cannons. Demonstrating sound judgment and outstanding bravery, this hastily organized force beat back attacks by two Union cavalry divisions in the "Wagoners Fight." Imboden's efforts saved the wagon train and thousands of men who would otherwise have been captured or killed. General Lee praised Imboden and reported that he "gallantly repulsed" the enemy troopers. French's Imboden's Brigade in the Gettysburg Campaign is based on scores of archival sources, newspaper accounts, and an excellent understanding of the terrain. The dozens of maps, photos, and illustrations, coupled with French's smooth prose, tells in riveting detail the full story of the often forgotten but absolutely critical role Imboden and his men played during the final fateful days of the Gettysburg Campaign.

The Gettysburg Campaign June July 1863 Illustrated Edition

Includes 7 maps and numerous other illustrations The Gettysburg Campaign, June-July 1863 continues the series of campaign brochures commemorating our national sacrifices during the American Civil War.

The Gettysburg Campaign  June July 1863  Illustrated Edition

Author: Carol Reardon

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 1786254387

Page: 59

View: 770

Includes 7 maps and numerous other illustrations The Gettysburg Campaign, June-July 1863 continues the series of campaign brochures commemorating our national sacrifices during the American Civil War. Authors Carol Reardon and Tom Vossler examine the operations that culminated in the pivotal three-day Battle of Gettysburg, pitting the Union Army of the Potomac under Maj. Gen. George G. Meade against the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee.

Last Chance For Victory

Last Chance for Victory addresses these issues by studying Lee's decisions and the military intelligence he possessed when each was made.Packed with new information and original research, Last Chance for Victory draws alarming conclusions ...

Last Chance For Victory

Author: Scott Bowden

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 9780306812613

Page: 640

View: 904

Long after nearly fifty thousand soldiers shed their blood there, serious misunderstandings persist about Robert E. Lee's generalship at Gettysburg. What were Lee's choices before, during, and after the battle? What did he know that caused him to act as he did? Last Chance for Victory addresses these issues by studying Lee's decisions and the military intelligence he possessed when each was made.Packed with new information and original research, Last Chance for Victory draws alarming conclusions to complex issues with precision and clarity. Readers will never look at Robert E. Lee and Gettysburg the same way again.

The Gettysburg Campaign

"The Battle of Gettysburg attained a special aura that has distinguished it ever since.

The Gettysburg Campaign

Author: Carol Reardon

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 63

View: 752

"The Battle of Gettysburg attained a special aura that has distinguished it ever since. Boston journalist Charles Carleton Coffin dubbed it "the high water mark" of the rebellion, while others described it as the "turning point of the war." But it was President Lincoln who most eloquently expressed Gettysburg's significance. On 19 November 1863, Lincoln delivered "a few appropriate remarks" at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery that became known as the Gettysburg Address: "We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain-that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." --p. 61.

New Jersey Troops in the Gettysburg Campaign from June 5 to July 31 1863

This 19th-century book is a history of the New Jersey regiments involved in the engagements before, during and after the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863.

New Jersey Troops in the Gettysburg Campaign from June 5 to July 31  1863

Author: Samuel Toombs

Publisher: BIG BYTE BOOKS

ISBN:

Page: 406

View: 240

This 19th-century book is a history of the New Jersey regiments involved in the engagements before, during and after the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863.

Cashtown During the Gettysburg Campaign 1863

Most of Geenral Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia marched through here. This is the story of this small community and its people during one of the most critical military campaigns in American history.

Cashtown During the Gettysburg Campaign  1863

Author: Suzanne Youngblood

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780615838793

Page: 78

View: 482

During the 1863 Gettysburg Campaign, Cashtown, Pennsylvania found itself in the middle of events. Most of Geenral Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia marched through here. This is the story of this small community and its people during one of the most critical military campaigns in American history

The Louisiana Tigers in the Gettysburg Campaign June July 1863

Appendices include an order of battle for East Cemetery Hill, a recap of the weather during the entire Gettysburg Campaign, a day-by-day chronology of the Tigers' movements and campsites, and the text of the official reports from General ...

The Louisiana Tigers in the Gettysburg Campaign  June July 1863

Author: Scott L. Mingus, Sr.

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 0807159131

Page: 336

View: 129

Previous works on Confederate brigadier general Harry T. Hays's First Louisiana Brigade -- better known as the "Louisiana Tigers" -- have tended to focus on just one day of the Tigers' service -- their role in attacking East Cemetery Hill at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863 -- and have touched only lightly on the brigade's role at the Second Battle of Winchester, an important prelude to Gettysburg. In this commanding study, Scott L. Mingus, Sr., offers the first significant detailed exploration of the Louisiana Tigers during the entirety of the 1863 Gettysburg Campaign. Mingus begins by providing a sweeping history of the Louisiana Tigers; their predecessors, Wheat's Tigers; the organizational structure and leadership of the brigade in 1863; and the personnel that made up its ranks. Covering the Tigers' movements and battle actions in depth, he then turns to the brigade's march into the Shenandoah Valley and the Tigers' key role in defeating the Federal army at the Second Battle of Winchester. Combining soldiers' reminiscences with contemporary civilian accounts, Mingus breaks new ground by detailing the Tigers' march into Pennsylvania, their first trip to Gettysburg in the week before the battle, their two-day occupation of York, Pennsylvania -- the largest northern town to fall to the Confederate army -- and their march back to Gettysburg. He offers the first full-scale discussion of the Tigers' interaction with the local population during their invasion of Pennsylvania and includes detailed accounts of the citizens' reactions to the Tigers -- many not published since appearing in local newspapers over a century ago. Mingus explores the Tigers' actions on the first two days of the Battle of Gettysburg and meticulously recounts their famed assault on East Cemetery Hill, one of the pivotal moments of the battle. He closes with the Tigers' withdrawal from Gettysburg and their retreat into Virginia. Appendices include an order of battle for East Cemetery Hill, a recap of the weather during the entire Gettysburg Campaign, a day-by-day chronology of the Tigers' movements and campsites, and the text of the official reports from General Hays for Second Winchester and Gettysburg. Comprehensive and engaging, Mingus's exhaustive work constitutes the definitive account of General Hays's remarkable brigade during the critical summer of 1863.

Last Chance For Victory

Last Chance for Victory: Robert E. Lee and the Gettysburg Campaign addresses these issues by studying Lee's choices before, during, and after the battle, the information he possessed at the time and each decision that was made, and why he ...

Last Chance For Victory

Author: Scott Bowden

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0786730404

Page: 640

View: 703

Gettysburg is the most written about battle in American military history. Generations after nearly 50,000 soldiers shed their blood there, serious and fundamental misunderstandings persist about Robert E. Lee's generalship during the campaign and battle. Most are the basis of popular myths about the epic fight. Last Chance for Victory: Robert E. Lee and the Gettysburg Campaign addresses these issues by studying Lee's choices before, during, and after the battle, the information he possessed at the time and each decision that was made, and why he acted as he did. Even options open to Lee that he did not act upon are carefully explored from the perspective of what Lee and his generals knew at the time. Some of the issues addressed include:Whether Lee's orders to Jeb Stuart were discretionary and allowed him to conduct his raid around the Federal army. The authors conclusively answer this important question with the most original and unique analysis ever applied to this controversial issue;Why Richard Ewell did not attack Cemetery Hill as ordered by General Lee, and why every historian who has written that Lee's orders to Ewell were discretionary are dead wrong;Why Little Round Top was irrelevant to the July 2 fighting, a fact Lee clearly recognized;Why Cemetery Hill was the weakest point along the entire Federal line, and how close the Southerners came to capturing it;Why Lee decided to launch en echelon attack on July 2, and why most historians have never understood what it was or how close it came to success; Last Chance for Victory will be labeled heresy by some, blasphemy by others, all because its authors dare to call into question the dogmas of Gettysburg. But they do so carefully, using facts, logic, and reason to weave one of the most compelling and riveting military history books of our age.Readers will never look at Robert E. Lee and Gettysburg the same way again.

The Gettysburg Campaign June and July 1863

Offers a detailed look at the strategies used by the Union and Confederate forces at Gettysburg, explains why this battle was the turning point of the war, and shares anecdotes about individual soldiers and generals

The Gettysburg Campaign  June and July  1863

Author: Albert A. Nofi

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 192

View: 977

Offers a detailed look at the strategies used by the Union and Confederate forces at Gettysburg, explains why this battle was the turning point of the war, and shares anecdotes about individual soldiers and generals

Much Embarrassed

Much Embarrassed investigates how the Confederate and Union military intelligence systems had been sculpted by the preceding events of the war and how this led to the final outcome of the Gettysburg Campaign.

Much Embarrassed

Author: George Donne

Publisher:

ISBN: 1911096885

Page: 204

View: 720

Before the first shots were fired at Gettysburg - for many, the most significant engagement of the American Civil War - a private battle had been raging for weeks. As the Confederate Army marched into Union territory, the Federal Forces desperately sought to hunt them down before they struck at any of the great cities of the North. Whoever could secure accurate information on their opponent would have a decisive advantage once the fighting started. When the two armies finally met on the morning of 1 July 1863 their understanding of the prevailing situation could not have been more different. While the Rebel Third Corps was expecting to brush away a group of local militia guarding the town, the Federal I Corps was preparing itself for a major battle. For three brutal days, the Rebel Army smashed at the Union troops, without success. The illustrious Confederate General Robert E. Lee would lose a third of his army and the tide of the rebellion would begin its retreat. Robert Lee himself would begin the argument on the contribution of military intelligence to his defeat by seeking to blame his cavalry. Generations of historians would debate into what factors played a decisive role, but no one has sought to explore the root of how the most able General of his era could have left himself so vulnerable at the climax of such a vital operation. Much Embarrassed investigates how the Confederate and Union military intelligence systems had been sculpted by the preceding events of the war and how this led to the final outcome of the Gettysburg Campaign. While the success of the Confederate strategy nurtured a fundamental flaw in their appreciation of intelligence, recurrent defeat led the Federal Army to develop one of the most advanced intelligence structures in history. Lee was right to highlight the importance of military intelligence to his failure at Gettysburg, but he would never appreciate that the seeds of his defeat had been sown long before.

The Gettysburg Campaign

The Gettysburg Campaign: The History and Legacy of the Civil War's Most Famous Campaign analyzes the entire campaign and its major battles, from Brandy Station to the retreat of Lee's army after Pickett's Charge.

The Gettysburg Campaign

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781985384057

Page: 214

View: 379

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting by soldiers and generals on both sides *Discusses the controversies surrounding the campaign, such as Stuart's ride before the battle and who's to blame for the Confederate loss *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "The failure to crush the Federal army in Pennsylvania in 1863, in the opinion of almost all of the officers of the Army of Northern Virginia, can be expressed in five words-the absence of the cavalry." - Confederate General Henry Heth "I've always thought the Yankees had something to do with it." - George Pickett Without question, the most famous battle of the American Civil War took place outside of the small town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, which happened to be a transportation hub, serving as the center of a wheel with several roads leading out to other Pennsylvanian towns. From July 1-3, Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia tried everything in its power to decisively defeat George Meade's Union Army of the Potomac, unleashing ferocious assaults that inflicted nearly 50,000 casualties in all. Day 1 of the battle would have been one of the 25 biggest battles of the Civil War itself, and it ended with a tactical Confederate victory. But over the next two days, Lee would try and fail to dislodge the Union army with attacks on both of its flanks during the second day and Pickett's Charge on the third and final day. Meade's stout defense held, barely, repulsing each attempted assault, handing the Union a desperately needed victory that ended up being one of the Civil War's turning points. After the South had lost the war, the importance of Gettysburg as one of the "high tide" marks of the Confederacy became apparent to everyone, making the battle all the more important in the years after it had been fought. While former Confederate generals cast about for scapegoats, with various officers pointing fingers at Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, and James Stuart, historians and avid Civil War fans became obsessed with studying and analyzing all the command decisions and army movements during the entire campaign. Despite the saturation of coverage, Americans refuse to grow tired of visiting the battlefield and reliving the biggest battle fought in North America. The Gettysburg Campaign: The History and Legacy of the Civil War's Most Famous Campaign analyzes the entire campaign and its major battles, from Brandy Station to the retreat of Lee's army after Pickett's Charge. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Gettysburg campaign like never before, in no time at all.

Beneath a Northern Sky

This new edition makes use of new primary source material and augments the coverage of regiments other than the 20th Maine.

Beneath a Northern Sky

Author: Steven E. Woodworth

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Incorporated

ISBN:

Page: 229

View: 699

Of all the places and events in this nation's history, Gettysburg may well be the name best known to Americans. In Beneath a Northern Sky, eminent Civil War historian Steven E. Woodworth offers a balanced and thorough overview of the entire battle, its drama, and its meaning. From Lee's decision to take his heretofore successful Army of Northern Virginia across the Potomac and into Pennsylvania to the withdrawal of the battle-battered Confederate's back across the river into Virginia, Woodworth paints a vivid picture of this pivotal campaign. Instead of focusing on only one aspect of the Gettysburg Campaign as most other books do, Beneath a Northern Sky tells the tale of the entire battle in a richly detailed but swiftly moving narrative. This new edition makes use of new primary source material and augments the coverage of regiments other than the 20th Maine.

The Gettysburg Campaign Birth of the Operational Art

Although U.S. Army doctrine may have been late in formally recognizing the existence and significance of the operational level of war and its supporting art, it may have appeared very early in our military history.

The Gettysburg Campaign  Birth of the Operational Art

Author: Major Kevin B. Marcus US Army

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 1782899448

Page: 58

View: 628

While hundreds of volumes exist on the Gettysburg Campaign, most examine the battle’s tactical framework and focus on the activities of brigades and regiments. However, of more interest to the serving military professional may be an analysis of the degree to which the Confederacy’s design and execution exemplify attributes of what is now known as the operational art. This monograph provides just such a study. The importance of the operational level of war and its supporting art cannot be overstated. Only with a recognition of this level between those of strategy and tactics and a mastery of its art can commanders have the appropriate frame of reference to link strategic goals assigned by national authorities with the tactical activities of their subordinate commanders. Although U.S. Army doctrine may have been late in formally recognizing the existence and significance of the operational level of war and its supporting art, it may have appeared very early in our military history. Indeed, without being named as such, the concept may have been placed into effect as early as the American Civil War.

The Gettysburg Campaign

"The Battle of Gettysburg attained a special aura that has distinguished it ever since.

The Gettysburg Campaign

Author: Carol Reardon

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 63

View: 472

"The Battle of Gettysburg attained a special aura that has distinguished it ever since. Boston journalist Charles Carleton Coffin dubbed it "the high water mark" of the rebellion, while others described it as the "turning point of the war." But it was President Lincoln who most eloquently expressed Gettysburg's significance. On 19 November 1863, Lincoln delivered "a few appropriate remarks" at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery that became known as the Gettysburg Address: "We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain-that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom-and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." --p. 61.