The Death of Murat Idrissi

Their tale of confinement and escape is as old as the landscapes and cultures so vividly depicted in this story of where Europe and Africa come closest to meeting, even if they never quite touch.

The Death of Murat Idrissi

Author: Tommy Wieringa

Publisher: Scribe Publications

ISBN: 1925693333

Page: 112

View: 510

Two venturesome women on a journey through the land of their fathers and mothers. A wrong turn. A bad decision. They had no idea, when they arrived in Morocco, that their usual freedoms as young European women would not be available. So, when the spry Saleh presents himself as their guide and saviour, they embrace his offer. He extracts them from a tight space, only to lead them inexorably into an even tighter one: and from this far darker space there is no exit. Their tale of confinement and escape is as old as the landscapes and cultures so vividly depicted in this story of where Europe and Africa come closest to meeting, even if they never quite touch.

Cultural Practices of Victimhood

The Dutch writer Tommy Wieringa published his novel De dood van Murat Idrissi
(The Death of Murat Idrissi) in 2017. After an extended literary sketch of the
Mediterranean Sea, the novel tells the dramatic story of the smuggling of a young
 ...

Cultural Practices of Victimhood

Author: Martin Hoondert

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351373803

Page: 258

View: 594

Cultural Practices of Victimhood aims to set the agenda for a cultural study of victimhood. Words such as ‘victim’ and ‘victimhood’ represent shifting cultural signifiers, their meaning depending on the cultural context of their usage. Using case studies and through a practice-based approach, questions are asked about how victimhood is defined and constructed, whether in the ritual commemoration of refugees on Lampedusa, the artistic practices of an Aboriginal artist such as Richard Bell, or the media practices associated with police violence. Consisting of contributions by cultural studies experts with an interest in victim studies, this book seeks a double readership. On the one hand, it intends to break new ground with regards to a ‘cultural turn’ in the field of criminology, in particular victimology. On the other hand, it also seeks to open up discussions about a ‘victimological turn’ in culture studies. The volume invites scholars and advanced students active in both domains to reflect on victimhood in cultural practices.