Religion in the Medieval West

This book examines the religious life of this formative period, the history of the institutional Church, and focuses on the interaction between the Church and secular members of society.

Religion in the Medieval West

Author: Bernard Hamilton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780340808399

Page: 196

View: 395

Western European civilization in the medieval centuries was a time of significant development as the ascendency of the Roman Catholic Church spread Christianity throughout Europe. This book examines the religious life of this formative period, the history of the institutional Church, and focuses on the interaction between the Church and secular members of society. This new edition has been updated, and includes new visual evidence and a glossary of technical terms.

Religion in the History of the Medieval West

These ten essays by John Van Engen situate religion in the history of medieval Western Europe: as an unavoidable presence in everyday life, as a conceptual framework for social and political life, as a force integral to its historical ...

Religion in the History of the Medieval West

Author: John Van Engen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Page: 332

View: 791

These ten essays by John Van Engen situate religion in the history of medieval Western Europe: as an unavoidable presence in everyday life, as a conceptual framework for social and political life, as a force integral to its historical dynamics. Four of the essays are bibliographical and retrospective in nature, reviewing the field broadly, but also pointing toward a more dialectical approach to understanding the interaction of religion and society in the European middle ages. Other studies deal with large topics usually subsumed under the abstract term 'Christianization'. They grapple with learned sources as well as those associated with 'popular' religion, and show what can be gained from an imaginative use of all that lawyers and theologians said about religion in their society. The essays, finally, look for the quality and dynamic of change, even inventiveness, released by religious action and conviction in medieval European society.

Heresy Philosophy and Religion in the Medieval West

The papers in this volume fall into four sections.

Heresy  Philosophy  and Religion in the Medieval West

Author: Gordon Leff

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Page: 334

View: 942

The papers in this volume fall into four sections. The first part deals more generally with heresy, religious movements and the Church, while the second focuses on Wyclif, covering his path to dissent, his religious doctrines, and a doctrinal comparison with Hus. Philosophical themes come to the fore in the third section, which has papers on the decline of scholasticism in the 14th century and on the trivium, and also includes hitherto unpublished essays on the theology of Augustine's two cities and on Ockham and nominalism. The final part, with another two papers published here for the first time, discusses Christian, Augustinian and Franciscan concepts of man, and the concepts of natural rights according to Ockham and the Franciscans.

Religion and Society in the Medieval West 600 1200

In these articles, the Oxford historian Henry Mayr-Harting explores the religion of secular rulers, the religion (or relative lack of it) of bishops and churches, the religion of custodians at shrines or of recluses or artists, as well as ...

Religion and Society in the Medieval West  600 1200

Author: Henry Mayr-Harting

Publisher: Variorum

ISBN: 9780754668985

Page: 344

View: 933

The papers reprinted here are concerned with the very varied ways in which religion made an impact upon, or was intertwined with, political and social life. They span the period from 600 to 1200, with particular points of focus on early Anglo-Saxon England, Charlemagne, the Ottonian empire, and 12th-century England. In these articles, the Oxford historian Henry Mayr-Harting explores the religion of secular rulers, the religion (or relative lack of it) of bishops and churches, the religion of custodians at shrines or of recluses or artists, as well as religious phenomena such as angelic apparitions, conversion, or apocalypticism.

Church and People in the Medieval West 900 1200

Church and People in the Medieval West gets to the root of belief in the Middle Ages, covering topics including pastoral reform, popular religion, monasticism, heresy and much more, throughout the central middle ages from 900-1200.

Church and People in the Medieval West  900 1200

Author: Sarah Hamilton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317325338

Page: 432

View: 832

During the middle ages, belief in God was the single more important principle for every person, and the all-powerful church was the most important institution. It is impossible to understand the medieval world without understanding the religious vision of the time, and this new textbook offers an approach which explores the meaning of this in day-to-day life, as well as the theory behind it. Church and People in the Medieval West gets to the root of belief in the Middle Ages, covering topics including pastoral reform, popular religion, monasticism, heresy and much more, throughout the central middle ages from 900-1200. Suitable for undergraduate courses in medieval history, and those returning to or approaching the subject for the first time.

The Irish in Early Medieval Europe

This edited collection of brand new essays brings together some of the world's leading experts in the field who synthesise major critical developments, and offer exciting new perspectives on the Irish peregrini.

The Irish in Early Medieval Europe

Author: Roy Flechner

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137430613

Page: 288

View: 497

Many Irish scholars, known as 'peregrini', arrived in Continental Europe in the early Middle Ages making a significant cultural impact. This edited collection of brand new essays brings together some of the world's leading experts in the field who synthesise major critical developments, and offer exciting new perspectives on the Irish peregrini.

Rome and Religion in the Medieval World

The essays highlight and deepen scholarly appreciation of Rome in the rich and varied religious culture of the medieval world.

Rome and Religion in the Medieval World

Author: Professor Owen M Phelan

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472421140

Page: 390

View: 516

Rome and Religion in the Medieval World provides a panoramic and interdisciplinary exploration of Rome and religious culture. The studies build upon or engage Thomas F.X. Noble’s interest in Rome, especially his landmark contributions to the origins of the Papal States and early medieval image controversies. Scholars from a variety of disciplines offer new viewpoints on key issues and questions relating to medieval religious, cultural and intellectual history. Each study explores different dimensions of Rome and religion, including medieval art, theology, material culture, politics, education, law, and religious practice. Drawing upon a wide range of sources, including manuscripts, relics, historical and normative texts, theological tracts, and poetry, the authors illuminate the complexities of medieval Christianity, especially as practiced in the city of Rome itself, and elsewhere in Europe when influenced by the idea of Rome. Some trace early medieval legacies to the early modern period when Protestant and Catholic theologians used early medieval religious texts to define and debate forms of Roman Christianity. The essays highlight and deepen scholarly appreciation of Rome in the rich and varied religious culture of the medieval world.

Islam and the Medieval West

Illustrated catalogue of crafts exhibition and collection of papers of the Ninth Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, SUNY Binghamton, May 1975.

Islam and the Medieval West

Author: Stanley Ferber

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780873958028

Page: 254

View: 915

Illustrated catalogue of crafts exhibition and collection of papers of the Ninth Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, SUNY Binghamton, May 1975.

Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages

Professor R. W. Southern's book covers the period from the eighth to the sixteenth century, highlighting the main features of each medieval age and studying the Papacy, the relations between Rome and her rival Constantinople, the bishops ...

Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages

Author: Richard William Southern

Publisher: Penguin Group USA

ISBN: 9780140137552

Page: 376

View: 716

The history of the Western church in the Middle Ages is the history of the most elaborate and thoroughly integrated system of religious thought and practice the world has ever known. It is also the history of European society during eight hundred years of sometimes rapid change. This authoritative history shows how the concept of an organized human society, both religious and secular, as an expression of a divinely ordered universe, was central to medieval thought. Professor R. W. Southern's book covers the period from the eighth to the sixteenth century, highlighting the main features of each medieval age and studying the Papacy, the relations between Rome and her rival Constantinople, the bishops and archbishops and the various religious orders in detail, providing a superb study of the period.

Religion and the Rise of Western Culture

In this new edition of his classic work, Religion and the Rise of Western Culture, Christopher Dawson addresses two of the most pressing subjects of our day: the origin of Europe and the religious roots of Western culture.

Religion and the Rise of Western Culture

Author: Christopher Dawson

Publisher: Image

ISBN: 0307569160

Page: 242

View: 232

In this new edition of his classic work, Religion and the Rise of Western Culture, Christopher Dawson addresses two of the most pressing subjects of our day: the origin of Europe and the religious roots of Western culture. With the magisterial sweep of Toynbee, to whom he is often compared, Dawson tells here the tale of medieval Christendom. From the brave travels of sixth-century Irish monks to the grand synthesis of Thomas Aquinas in the thirteenth century, Dawson brilliantly shows how vast spiritual movements arose from tiny origins and changed the face of medieval Europe from one century to the next. The legacy of those years of ferment remains with us in the great cathedrals, Gregorian chant, and the works of Giotto and Dante. Even more, though, for Dawson these centuries charged the soul of the West with a spiritual concern -- a concern that he insists "can never be entirely undone except by the total negation or destruction of Western man himself."

Demonic Possession and Lived Religion in Later Medieval Europe

Bynum, Caroline Walker, The Resurrection of the Body in Western Christianity,
200–1336 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1995). Bynum, Caroline
Walker, Christian Materiality: An Essay on Religion in Late Medieval West (New
York: ...

Demonic Possession and Lived Religion in Later Medieval Europe

Author: Sari Katajala-Peltomaa

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198850468

Page: 240

View: 154

Demonic possession was a spiritual state that often had physical symptoms; however, in Demonic Possession and Lived Religion in Later Medieval Europe, Sari Katajala-Peltomaa argues that demonic possession was a social phenomenon which should be understood with regard to the community and culture. She focuses on significant case studies from canonization processes (c. 1240-1450) which show how each set of sources formed its own specific context, in which demonic presence derived from different motivations, reasonings, and methods of categorization. The chosen perspective is that of lived religion, which is both a thematic approach and a methodology: a focus on rituals, symbols, and gestures, as well as sensitivity to nuances and careful contextualizing of the cases are constitutive elements of the argumentation. The analysis contests the hierarchy between the 'learned' and the 'popular' within religion, as well as the existence of a strict polarity between individual and collective religious participation. Demonic presence disclosed negotiations over authority and agency; it shows how the personal affected the communal, and vice versa, and how they were eventually transformed into discourses and institutions of the Church; that is, definitions of the miraculous and the diabolical. Geographically, the volume covers Western Europe, comparing Northern and Southern material and customs. The structure follows the logic of the phenomenon, beginning with the background reasons offered as a cause of demonic possession, continuing with communities' responses and emotions, including construction of sacred caregiving methods. Finally, the ways in which demonic presence contributed to wider societal debates in the fields of politics and spirituality are discussed. Alterity and inversion of identity, gender, and various forms of corporeality and the interplay between the sacred and diabolical are themes that run all through the volume.

The Spirituality of the Medieval West

Defining spirituality as 'the dynamic unity between the content of a faith and the way in which it is lived by historically determined human beings', Vauchez steps outside the clerical world usually studied to trace the religious mentality ...

The Spirituality of the Medieval West

Author: André Vauchez

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781607242123

Page: 182

View: 873

Pilgrims and Pilgrimage in the Medieval West

Concentrating on the medieval Latin West, this book covers the period spanning the growth in pilgrimage during the 7th century to the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century, when pilgrimage ceased to be a vital part of European ...

Pilgrims and Pilgrimage in the Medieval West

Author: Diana Webb

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857715666

Page: 304

View: 310

Pilgrimage was an integral part of both medieval religion and medieval life, and from its origins in the 4th century Mediterranean world it spread rapidly to Northern Europe as a pan-European devotional phenomenon. Concentrating on the medieval Latin West, this book covers the period spanning the growth in pilgrimage during the 7th century to the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century, when pilgrimage ceased to be a vital part of European Christian culture. It draws extensively upon original source materials accounts of pilgrimage, guidebooks, chronicles, wills, covert memos and state documents, thereby seeking to uncover the motives of the pilgrims themselves as well as details of and attitudes towards their preparations, journeys, shrines and eventual destinations (particularly Jerusalem, Compostela and Rome). The author - in setting oy the pilgrims' itineraries and describing the problems and hazards that they encountered en route - makes a major contribution to our knowledge both of the central role that pilgrimage played in the religious life of the medieval Christian and of the history of medieval Europe in general..

Motherhood Religion and Society in Medieval Europe 400 1400

Whatever the reasons, the result is that the historiography of the medieval period is largely motherless. The aim of this book is to insist that this picture is intolerably one-dimensional, and to begin to change it.

Motherhood  Religion  and Society in Medieval Europe  400   1400

Author: Dr Conrad Leyser

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409482715

Page: 388

View: 173

Who can concentrate on thoughts of Scripture or philosophy and be able to endure babies crying … ? Will he put up with the constant muddle and squalor which small children bring into the home? The wealthy can do so … but philosophers lead a very different life … So, according to Peter Abelard, did his wife Heloise state in characteristically stark terms the antithetical demands of family and scholarship. Heloise was not alone in making this assumption. Sources from Jerome onward never cease to remind us that the life of the mind stands at odds with life in the family. For all that we have moved in the past two generations beyond kings and battles, fiefs and barons, motherhood has remained a blind spot for medieval historians. Whatever the reasons, the result is that the historiography of the medieval period is largely motherless. The aim of this book is to insist that this picture is intolerably one-dimensional, and to begin to change it. The volume is focussed on the paradox of motherhood in the European Middle Ages: to be a mother is at once to hold great power, and by the same token to be acutely vulnerable. The essays look to analyse the powers and the dangers of motherhood within the warp and weft of social history, beginning with the premise that religious discourse or practice served as a medium in which mothers (and others) could assess their situation, defend claims, and make accusations. Within this frame, three main themes emerge: survival, agency, and institutionalization. The volume spans the length and breadth of the Middle Ages, from late Roman North Africa through ninth-century Byzantium to late medieval Somerset, drawing in a range of types of historian, including textual scholars, literary critics, students of religion and economic historians. The unity of the volume arises from the very diversity of approaches within it, all addressed to the central topic.

Christendom and Christianity in the Middle Ages

This is a print on demand book and is therefore non- returnable.

Christendom and Christianity in the Middle Ages

Author: Adriaan H. Bredero

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802849922

Page: 420

View: 614

This is a print on demand book and is therefore non- returnable. Though buffeted on all sides by rapid and at times cataclysmic social, political, and economic change, the medieval church was able to make adjustments that kept it from becoming simply a fossil from the past rather than an enduring institution of salvation. The dynamic interaction between the medieval church and society gives form to this compelling and well-informed study by Adriaan Bredero. By considering medieval Christianity in full relation to its historical context, Bredero elucidates complex medieval realities -- many of which run counter to common modern notions about the Middle Ages. Bredero moves beyond the usual treatment of history by framing his overall discussion in terms of a fascinating and relevant question: To what extent is Christianity today still molded by medieval society? The book begins with an overview of religion and the church in medieval society, from the early Christianization of Western Europe through the fifteenth century. Bredero counters earlier romanticized assessments of the Middle Ages as a thoroughly Christian period by arriving at a definition of Christendom, not in its original sense as the empire of Charlemagne, but rather as "the countries, people, and matters which stood under the influence of Christ."

The Christian World of the Middle Ages

This powerful reconstruction of the faith and heritage of medieval Christendom reveals its extraordinary impact in both great empires and tiny enclaves.

The Christian World of the Middle Ages

Author: Bernard Hamilton

Publisher: Sutton Publishing

ISBN: 9780750924054

Page: 256

View: 350

This powerful reconstruction of the faith and heritage of medieval Christendom reveals its extraordinary impact in both great empires and tiny enclaves.

The Oldest Vocation

Christian Motherhood in the Medieval West Clarissa W. Atkinson ... In order to
investigate medieval motherhood, then, we must look closely at Christianity in
western Europe in the Middle Ages, a complex religious and cultural system with
a ...

The Oldest Vocation

Author: Clarissa W. Atkinson

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 150174089X

Page: 294

View: 660

According to an old story, a woman concealed her sex and ruled as pope for a few years in the ninth century. Pope Joan was not betrayed by a lover or discovered by an enemy; her downfall came when she went into labor during a papal procession through the streets of Rome. From the myth of Joan to the experiences of saints, nuns, and ordinary women, The Oldest Vocation brings to life both the richness and the troubling contradictions of Christian motherhood in medieval Europe. After tracing the roots of medieval ideologies of motherhood in early Christianity, Clarissa W. Atkinson reconstructs the physiological assumptions underlying medieval notions about women's bodies and reproduction; inherited from Greek science and popularized through the practice of midwifery, these assumptions helped shape common beliefs about what mothers were. She then describes the development of "spiritual motherhood" both as a concept emerging out of monastic ideologies in the early Middle Ages and as a reality in the lives of certain remarkable women. Atkinson explores the theological dimensions of medieval motherhood by discussing the cult of the Virgin Mary in twelfth-century art, story, and religious expression. She also offers a fascinating new perspective on the women saints of the later Middle Ages, many of whom were mothers; their lives and cults forged new relationships between maternity and holiness. The Oldest Vocation concludes where most histories of motherhood begin—in early modern Europe, when the family was institutionalized as a center of religious and social organization. Anyone interested in the status of motherhood, or in women's history, the cultural history of the Middle Ages, or the history of religion will want to read this book.