Reading Romans within Judaism

In the chapters in this volume, Nanos shows why these translations and interpretive decisions, among others, do not likely represent what Paul wrote or meant.

Reading Romans within Judaism

Author: Mark D. Nanos

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1498242324

Page: 342

View: 119

Over fifty years ago, Vatican II's Nostra Aetate 4 drew from Romans 11 to challenge the way Paul's voice has been used to negatively discuss Jews and Judaism. The church called for Catholics to conceptualize Jews as "brothers" in "an everlasting covenant," and many other Christian organizations have expressed similar sentiments in the years since. Nevertheless, the portrayal of Jews as "branches broken off," "hardened," "without faith," "disobedient," and "enemies of God" whom Christians have "replaced" as "true Israel," are among the many ways that readers encounter Paul's views of Jews and Judaism in today's translations and interpretations of this chapter, and throughout the letter as well. In the chapters in this volume, Nanos shows why these translations and interpretive decisions, among others, do not likely represent what Paul wrote or meant. Each essay offers challenges to the received view of Paul from the research hypothesis that Paul and the Christ-followers to whom he wrote were still practicing Judaism (a Jewish way of life) within subgroups of the Jewish synagogue communities of Rome, and that they understood Paul to observe Torah and promote Judaism for their communities.

Reading Romans in Context

In this non-technical collection of short essays, beginning and intermediate students are given a chance to see firsthand what makes Paul a distinctive thinker in relation to his Jewish contemporaries.

Reading Romans in Context

Author: Ben C. Blackwell

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 0310517966

Page: 192

View: 122

Readers of Paul today are more than ever aware of the importance of interpreting Paul’s letters in their Jewish context. In Reading Romans in Context a team of Pauline scholars go beyond a general introduction that surveys historical events and theological themes and explore Paul’s letter to the Romans in light of Second Temple Jewish literature. In this non-technical collection of short essays, beginning and intermediate students are given a chance to see firsthand what makes Paul a distinctive thinker in relation to his Jewish contemporaries. Following the narrative progression of Romans, each chapter pairs a major unit of the letter with one or more thematically related Jewish text, introduces and explores the theological nuances of the comparative text, and shows how these ideas illuminate our understanding of the book of Romans.

Reading Romans after Supersessionism

All too often, however, these topics are read in supersessionist ways. This book argues that such readings are unpersuasive.

Reading Romans after Supersessionism

Author: J. Brian Tucker

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1498217524

Page: 310

View: 156

The Letter to the Romans explains the way Paul thought Jewish covenantal identity continued now that the messianic era had begun. More particularly, Paul addresses the relevance of Abraham for Jews and gentiles, the role of Torah, and the way it is contextualized in Christ. All too often, however, these topics are read in supersessionist ways. This book argues that such readings are unpersuasive. It offers instead a post-supersessionist perspective in which Jewish covenantal identity continues in Paul's gospel. Paul is no destroyer of worlds. The aim of this book is to offer a different view of the key interpretive points that lead to supersessionist understandings of Paul's most important letter. It draws on the findings of those aligned with the Paul within Judaism paradigm and accents those findings with a light touch from social identity theory. When combined, these resources help the reader to hear Romans afresh, in a way that allows both Jewish and non-Jewish existing identities continued relevance.

The Mystery of Romans

Several key arguments here are: Those addressed in Paul's letter were still an integral part of the Roman synagogue communities.

The Mystery of Romans

Author: Mark D. Nanos

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 9781451413762

Page: 435

View: 119

Paul's letter to the Romans, says Nanos, is an example of Jewish correspondence, addressing believers in Jesus who are steeped in Jewish ways-whether of Jewish or gentile origin. Arguing against those who think Paul was an apostate from Judaism, Nanos maintains Paul's continuity with his Jewish heritage. Several key arguments here are: Those addressed in Paul's letter were still an integral part of the Roman synagogue communities. The "weak" are non- Christian Jews, while the "strong" included both Jewish and gentile converts to belief in Jesus. Paul as a practicing devout Jew insists on the rules of behavior for "the righteous gentiles." Christian subordination to authorities (Romans 13:1-7) is intended to enforce submission to leaders of the synagogues, not Roman government officials. Paul behaves in a way to confirm the very Jewish portrait of him in Acts: going first to the synagogues.

Reading Corinthians and Philippians within Judaism

" In this process, Nanos combines investigations of relevant elements from Jewish sources and from various Cynic and other Greco-Roman contemporaries, as well as the New Testament.

Reading Corinthians and Philippians within Judaism

Author: Mark D. Nanos

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1498242367

Page: 228

View: 468

The commentary tradition regarding 1 Corinthians unanimously identifies the "weak" as Christ-followers whose faith was not yet sufficient to indulge in the eating of idol food with indifference, as if ideally Paul wanted them to become "strong" enough to do so. Commentaries also do not hesitate to explain that Paul advised the Corinthians that he behaved like non-Jews (e.g., ate idol food) in order to win non-Jews to Christ, convinced that he was free from any obligation to observe Jewish covenantal behavior--except when he expediently chose to mimic Jewish behavior in order to win Jews to Christ. Similarly, commentators continue to conclude that in Philippians Paul called Jews "dogs" for upholding the value of undertaking circumcision, and that he renounced such identification as "mutilation." None of these interpretations likely represent what Paul meant originally, according to Nanos. Each essay explains why, and provides new alternatives for re-reading Paul's language "within Judaism." In this process, Nanos combines investigations of relevant elements from Jewish sources and from various Cynic and other Greco-Roman contemporaries, as well as the New Testament.

Reading Mark in Context

Following the narrative progression of Mark's Gospel, each chapter in this textbook (1) pairs a major unit of the Gospel with one or more sections of a thematically-related Jewish text, (2) introduces and explores the historical and ...

Reading Mark in Context

Author: Ben C. Blackwell

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN: 0310534461

Page: 288

View: 578

Over the last several decades, the Jewishness of Jesus has been at the forefront of scholarship and students of the New Testament are more than ever aware of the importance of understanding Jesus and the Gospels in their Jewish context. Reading Mark in Context helps students see the contour and texture of Jesus' engagement with his Jewish environment. It brings together a series of accessible essays that compare and contrast viewpoints, theologies, and hermeneutical practices of Mark and his various Jewish contemporaries. Going beyond an introduction that merely surveys historical events and theological themes, this textbook examines individual passages in Second Temple Jewish literature in order to illuminate the context of Mark's theology and the nuances of his thinking. Following the narrative progression of Mark's Gospel, each chapter in this textbook (1) pairs a major unit of the Gospel with one or more sections of a thematically-related Jewish text, (2) introduces and explores the historical and theological nuances of the comparative text, and (3) shows how the ideas in the comparative text illuminate those expressed in Mark.

Paul Jew Greek and Roman

This volume, Paul: Jew, Greek, and Roman, explores a number of the important and diverse cultural, ethnic and religious dimensions of the complex background of Paul the Apostle.

Paul  Jew  Greek  and Roman

Author: Stanley E. Porter

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9047424913

Page: 384

View: 754

This volume, Paul: Jew, Greek, and Roman, explores a number of the important and diverse cultural, ethnic and religious dimensions of the complex background of Paul the Apostle. Some of the treatments are focused and specific, while others range over the broad issues that go to making up the world of the Apostle.

Re reading Romans in context

Breaking with the tradition of reading Romans as a theological treatise devoted essentially to 'justification by faith', this 're-reading', drawing upon the insights of the 'new perspective on Paul', views it as a true letter written to ...

Re reading Romans in context

Author: Graham Jackman

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1291342133

Page:

View: 276

Paul Among the Gentiles A Radical Reading of Romans

This exciting new interpretation of Pauls Letter to the Romans approaches Pauls most famous letter from one of the newest scholarly positions within Pauline Studies: The Radical New Perspective on Paul (also known as Paul within Judaism).

Paul Among the Gentiles  A  Radical  Reading of Romans

Author: Jacob P. B. Mortensen

Publisher: Narr Francke Attempto Verlag

ISBN: 3772000754

Page: 366

View: 242

This exciting new interpretation of Pauls Letter to the Romans approaches Pauls most famous letter from one of the newest scholarly positions within Pauline Studies: The Radical New Perspective on Paul (also known as Paul within Judaism). As a point of departure, the author takes Pauls self-designation in 11:13 as apostle to the gentiles as so determining for Pauls mission that the audience of the letter is perceived to be exclusively gentile. The study finds confirmation of this reading-strategy in the letters construction of the interlocutor from chapter 2 onwards. Even in 2:17, where Paul describes the interlocutor as someone who calls himself a Jew, it requests to perceive this person as a gentile who presents himself as a Jew and not an ethnic Jew. If the interlocutor is perceived in this way throughout the letter, the dialogue between Paul and the interlocutor can be perceived as a continuous, unified and developing dialogue. In this way, this interpretation of Romans sketches out a position against a more disparate and fragmentary interpretation of Romans.

Paul Judaism and the Gentiles

This book is novel in its questioning of the adequacy of interpreting Paul from the perspective of the Reformation and in its application of sociological methods to the New Testament.

Paul  Judaism  and the Gentiles

Author: Francis Watson

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 0802840205

Page: 400

View: 219

This book is novel in its questioning of the adequacy of interpreting Paul from the perspective of the Reformation and in its application of sociological methods to the New Testament.

A Rereading of Romans

Paul's Letter to the Romans is one of the most influential writings of Christian theology.

A Rereading of Romans

Author: Stanley Kent Stowers

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300070682

Page: 383

View: 337

Paul's Letter to the Romans is one of the most influential writings of Christian theology. In this reinterpretation, the author provides a new reading that places Romans within the sociocultural, historical and rhetorical contexts of Paul's world.

Reading Romans

Johnson shows how Paul understands "righteousness by faith" as the faith of the human person Jesus, how "salvation" means inclusion in God's people, and how the work of the Holy Spirit transforms human conciousness so that believers can ...

Reading Romans

Author: Luke Timothy Johnson

Publisher: Smyth & Helwys Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 9781573122764

Page: 239

View: 168

The Epistle to the Romans is considered to be the classic of Reformation theology. Luke Johnson, a scholar from the Roman Catholic tradition, invests this commentary with breadth of perspective and clarity of expression. He focuses on understanding the key themes and their relationship to the whole of Pauline writings and the shaping of Christianity.

Thomas Aquinas on the Jews

Steven Boguslawski maintains in this provocative book that Thomas Aquinas in his Commentary on Romans uses predestination and election as hermeneutical keys to understand Romans 9-11 and to sustain a positive theological view of the Jewish ...

Thomas Aquinas on the Jews

Author: Steven C. Boguslawski

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN: 0809142333

Page: 145

View: 944

Steven Boguslawski maintains in this provocative book that Thomas Aquinas in his Commentary on Romans uses predestination and election as hermeneutical keys to understand Romans 9-11 and to sustain a positive theological view of the Jewish people. Thomas' positions in the Summa Theologiae on significant policy questions of his time regarding the Jews are set against the socio-historical context in which Thomas wrote. He integrates predestination and election, as treated in the Summa, with their use in the Commentary on Romans. Then he draws a comparison between Thomas's position and that of Augustine. In conclusion he asserts that Thomas's way of reading Romans 9-11 not only corrects and develops the received tradition but also sustains a positive theology of Judaism.

Paul with Judaism

Surprising common ground among the contributors presents a coherent alternative to the “New Perspective.” The volume concludes with a critical evaluation of the Paul within Judaism perspective by Terence L. Donaldson, a well-known voice ...

Paul with Judaism

Author: Mark D. Nanos

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 1451494289

Page: 360

View: 295

In these chapters, a group of renowned international scholars seek to describe Paul and his work from “within Judaism,” rather than on the assumption, still current after thirty years of the “New Perspective,” that in practice Paul left behind aspects of Jewish living after his discovery of Jesus as Christ (Messiah). After an introduction that surveys recent study of Paul and highlights the centrality of questions about Paul’s Judaism, chapters explore the implications of reading Paul’s instructions as aimed at Christ-following non-Jews, teaching them how to live in ways consistent with Judaism while remaining non-Jews. The contributors take different methodological points of departure: historical, ideological-critical, gender-critical, and empire-critical, and examine issues of terminology and of interfaith relations. Surprising common ground among the contributors presents a coherent alternative to the “New Perspective.” The volume concludes with a critical evaluation of the Paul within Judaism perspective by Terence L. Donaldson, a well-known voice representative of the best insights of the New Perspective.

Reading Romans Through the Centuries

His Philo - Semitism He was unusually well - informed about , and sympathetic to
, Judaism , which has led some people to suggest that he was a converted Jew .
But educated Romans were trained in the elements of Roman law , and that ...

Reading Romans Through the Centuries

Author: Jeffrey P. Greenman

Publisher: Brazos Press

ISBN:

Page: 223

View: 411

Provides twelve snapshots of how the Book of Romans has been interpreted, used, and debated in the history of the church.

The Irony of Galatians

Employing both traditional historical-critical methods and social-scientific criticism, Nanos explores the issues of purity; insiders/outsiders; the character of "the gospel"; the relationship between groups of Christ-followers in Jerusalem ...

The Irony of Galatians

Author: Mark D. Nanos

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 9780800632144

Page: 376

View: 677

Employing both traditional historical-critical methods and social-scientific criticism, Nanos explores the issues of purity; insiders/outsiders; the character of "the gospel"; the relationship between groups of Christ-followers in Jerusalem, Antioch, and Galatia; and evil-eye accusations.

If You Call Yourself a Jew

''If You Call Yourself a Jew' reads Paul's letter to the Romans as a dialogue between Paul and a gentile proselyte to Judaism.

If You Call Yourself a Jew

Author: Rafael Rodriguez

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 0227903862

Page: 336

View: 522

''If You Call Yourself a Jew' reads Paul's letter to the Romans as a dialogue between Paul and a gentile proselyte to Judaism. This fresh reading brings Romans into focus as Paul's exposition of the revelation of God's righteousness - his faithfulness tohis covenant promises to Abraham, which is brought to climax in the announcement that

Greeks Romans Jews

the people , with their backs to the shrine or ark ( chest ) that housed the scroll of
the Torah . ( 1 ) The service likely ... Lord , shield of Abraham . 66 ( 3 ) Readings
from the Torah and , often , from the Prophets may have followed the Prayer .

Greeks  Romans  Jews

Author: James D. Newsome

Publisher: Burns & Oates

ISBN:

Page: 475

View: 727