Philadelphia s Streetcar Heritage

Philadelphia's Streetcar Heritage is a photographic essay of the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, streetcar system.

Philadelphia s Streetcar Heritage

Author: Kenneth C. Springirth

Publisher: America Through Time

ISBN: 9781634991483

Page: 128

View: 301

Philadelphia's Streetcar Heritage is a photographic essay of the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, streetcar system. The first electric streetcar line in Philadelphia opened in 1892 and quickly replaced horsecar service by 1897. Streetcar lines were merged into the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company (PRT) in 1902 to achieve a unified system. There were 1,500 new streetcars purchased by 1913, which was the largest fleet of standardized streetcars ever purchased by one transit company. Ridership dropped during the Depression, and PRT reorganized as the Philadelphia Transportation Company (PTC) in 1940. After National City Lines (NCL) obtained control of PTC in 1955, many streetcar lines became bus operated. Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) acquired PTC in 1968. The overhaul of 112 Presidents' Conference Committee (PCC) cars began in 1979. Kawasaki Heavy Industries built 112 streetcars (light rail vehicles) for the subway surface lines. With buses taking over Route 15 (Girard Avenue) in 1992, only five subway surface lines remained. SEPTA restored Route 15 streetcar service in 2005 using Brookville Equipment Corporation rebuilt PCCII cars. Philadelphia's Streetcar Heritage documents the city's streetcars, including Fairmount Park Trolleys and trackless trolleys.

Philadelphia s Suburban Red Arrow Trolley Heritage

Philadelphia's Suburban Red Arrow Trolley Heritage is a photographic essay of suburban Philadelphia's Red Arrow system and operation by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA).

Philadelphia s Suburban Red Arrow Trolley Heritage

Author: Kenneth C. Springirth

Publisher: America Through Time

ISBN: 9781634991889

Page: 128

View: 329

Philadelphia's Suburban Red Arrow Trolley Heritage is a photographic essay of suburban Philadelphia's Red Arrow system and operation by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA). By 1899, the Philadelphia & West Chester Traction Company operated trolley service to West Chester. In 1902, the Ardmore & Llanerch Street Railway Company began service to Ardmore. Philadelphia & Garrettford Street Railway Company reached Media in 1913 and Sharon Hill in 1917. These companies consolidated into the Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Company (PSTC) in 1936, becoming known as Red Arrow Lines. Philadelphia & Western Railway Company (P&W) merged into PSTC in 1953. Pennsylvania State Highway Department plans to widen a portion of West Chester Pike resulted in buses replacing trolleys between West Chester and West Gate Hills in 1954. Rush hour trolley service continued between 69th Street Terminal and West Gate Hills until bus replacement in 1958. Buses took over Strafford Line in 1956 and Ardmore Line in 1966. SEPTA acquired PSTC in 1970 and purchased new rail cars for Media, Sharon Hill, and Norristown Lines. Philadelphia's Suburban Red Arrow Trolley Heritage documents Philadelphia's western suburbs trolley history.

The Ruby Slippers Madonna s Bra and Einstein s Brain

6330 152nd Street Located south of 152nd Street and 64th Avenue Surrey, ... is a 1912 heritage J.G. Brill streetcar originally built in Philadelphia, ...

The Ruby Slippers  Madonna s Bra  and Einstein s Brain

Author: Chris Epting

Publisher: Santa Monica Press

ISBN: 1595809783

Page: 304

View: 396

Anyone who has ever wondered where Dorothy's ruby slippers, George Washington's teeth, or the world's largest olive are located will be thrilled to take this journey to find hundreds of the most important items from America's popular culture. Found in such major institutions as the Smithsonian and the Basketball Hall of Fame as well as in such offbeat collections as the Sing Sing Prison Museum and the Delta Blues Museum, these pop culture treasures include the most famous—and quirkiest—items from movies, crime, TV, sports, music, history, and America's roadside attractions. The Ruby Slippers, Madonna's Bra, and Einstein's Brain is divided into the following chapters: American Curiosities, Roadside Relics, Historic Artifacts, Criminal Remains, Celebrity Antiquities, Movie and Television Keepsakes, Music Mementos, and Sports Memorabilia. There's even a list of the Top Ten Missing in Action Pop Culture Artifacts. Some of the most fascinating treasures found in the book include: The Cardiff Giant Thomas Edison's Last Breath World's Largest Ball of Twine George Washington's Teeth Lizzie Borden's Axe John Wilkes Booth's Thorax Watergate File Cabinet Abraham Zapruder's Camera Tom Thumb's Wedding Cake Casablanca Piano Easy Rider Motorcycle Jimi Hendrix's Woodstock Guitar Elvis Presley's Report Card Paul "Bear" Bryant's Hat Miracle on Ice Skates

Detroit s Streetcar Heritage

"America Through Time is an imprint of Fonthill Media LLC. Published by Arcadia Publishing by arrangement with Fonthill Media LLC."--Title page verso.

Detroit s Streetcar Heritage

Author: Kenneth C. Springirth

Publisher: America Through Time

ISBN: 9781634990721

Page: 128

View: 643

Detroit's Streetcar Heritage is a photographic essay of the Detroit, Michigan, streetcar system. Replacement of slow moving horsecar service began with the opening of an electric street railway by the Detroit Citizens Street Railway in 1892. By 1900, all of the Detroit streetcar systems were consolidated into the Detroit United Railway (DUR). Following voter approval, the City of Detroit purchased DUR in 1922, becoming the first large United States city to own and operate public transit under Detroit Department of Street Railways (DSR). Between 1921 and 1930, DSR purchased 781 Peter Witt type streetcars. Although DSR purchased 186 modern Presidents' Conference Committee (PCC) cars between 1945 and 1949, many streetcar lines were converted to bus operation. The last streetcar line on Woodward Avenue was converted to bus operation in 1956 with 183 PCC cars sold to Mexico City. Detroit's Streetcar Heritage documents the city's streetcar era plus scenes of the PCC cars in Mexico City, the Washington Boulevard Line which operated from 1976 to 2003, and the QLINE streetcar which opened in 2017 on Woodward Avenue linking Grand Boulevard with downtown Detroit.

Bartram Heritage

Louisiana • 129 Secondary Heritage Resources 129 South Carolina 130 Georgia ... 136 Marking and Registration 137 Future Bar tram Heritage Efforts 137 Who ...

Bartram Heritage

Author:

Publisher: Brad Sanders

ISBN:

Page: 198

View: 676

Trains Buses People Second Edition

Streetcar BRT Commuter Rail Prewar systems Cable Cars (San Francisco) 15 Girard ... SEPTA Regional Rail (Philadelphia) Exo (Montreal) 1980s-2000s “heritage” ...

Trains  Buses  People  Second Edition

Author: Christof Spieler

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 1642832138

Page: 341

View: 490

Transit expert Christof Spieler has fully updated and expanded his popular book Trains, Buses, People to include eight Canadian cities and two new US cities (Indianapolis and San Juan, Puerto Rico). In Trains, Buses, People, Second Edition: An Opinionated Atlas of US and Canadian Transit, Spieler profiles the 49 metropolitan areas in the US and eight metropolitan areas in Canada that have rail transit or BRT, using data, photos, and maps for easy comparison. The best and worst systems are ranked and Spieler offers analysis of how geography, politics, and history complicate transit planning. Trains, Buses, People, Second Edition will help any citizen, professional, or policymaker with a vested interest evaluate a transit proposal and understand what makes transit effective and how to make it inclusive.

Trains Buses People

Streetcar Prewar systems 15 Girard (Philadelphia) RTA Streetcars (New Orleans) Cable Cars (San Francisco) 1980s-2000s “heritage” systems F Market (San ...

Trains  Buses  People

Author: Christof Spieler

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 1610919033

Page: 264

View: 343

What are the best transit cities in the US? The best Bus Rapid Transit lines? The most useless rail transit lines? The missed opportunities? In the US, the 25 largest metropolitan areas and many smaller cities have fixed guideway transit—rail or bus rapid transit. Nearly all of them are talking about expanding. Yet discussions about transit are still remarkably unsophisticated. To build good transit, the discussion needs to focus on what matters—quality of service (not the technology that delivers it), all kinds of transit riders, the role of buildings, streets and sidewalks, and, above all, getting transit in the right places. Christof Spieler has spent over a decade advocating for transit as a writer, community leader, urban planner, transit board member, and enthusiast. He strongly believes that just about anyone—regardless of training or experience—can identify what makes good transit with the right information. In the fun and accessible Trains, Buses, People: An Opinionated Atlas of US Transit, Spieler shows how cities can build successful transit. He profiles the 47 metropolitan areas in the US that have rail transit or BRT, using data, photos, and maps for easy comparison. The best and worst systems are ranked and Spieler offers analysis of how geography, politics, and history complicate transit planning. He shows how the unique circumstances of every city have resulted in very different transit systems. Using appealing visuals, Trains, Buses, People is intended for non-experts—it will help any citizen, professional, or policymaker with a vested interest evaluate a transit proposal and understand what makes transit effective. While the book is built on data, it has a strong point of view. Spieler takes an honest look at what makes good and bad transit and is not afraid to look at what went wrong. He explains broad concepts, but recognizes all of the technical, geographical, and political difficulties of building transit in the real world. In the end,Trains, Buses, People shows that it is possible with the right tools to build good transit.

Southeastern Pennsylvania Trolleys

... urban trolley route , from the expanses of Northwest Philadelphia's Chestnut Hill through the crowded commercial Center City to South Philadelphia with ...

Southeastern Pennsylvania Trolleys

Author: Kenneth C. Springirth

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738556925

Page: 127

View: 365

An extensive number of trolley car lines linked the city of Philadelphia to the rich farmland and picturesque towns of southeastern Pennsylvania. These trolley lines traversed miles of narrow streets lined with row houses whose residents were proud working-class Americans. These historic photographs trace the trolley cars' routes, including Route 23, the region's longest urban trolley route, from the expanses of Northwest Philadelphia's Chestnut Hill through the crowded commercial Center City to South Philadelphia with a variety of neighborhood stops at everything in between. Southeastern Pennsylvania Trolleys follows the history of the trolley cars that have served this diverse and historic region.

People Power Places

While a trolley car is narrowly defined as an electric - powered railcar with ... John A. Lieper , " Family of 4 Lives in Old Trolley Car , ” Philadelphia ...

People  Power  Places

Author: Sally Ann McMurry

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN: 9781572330757

Page: 295

View: 531

From workers' cottages in Milwaukee's Polish community to Alaskan homesteads during the Great Depression, from early American retail stores to nineteenth-century prisons, different types of buildings reflect the diverse responses of people to their architectural needs. Through inquiry into such topics, the contributors to this volume examine a variety of building forms as they assess the current state of vernacular architecture studies. Because scholars in vernacular architecture have come to consider thematic questions rather than simply to look at types of structures, the essays chosen for this collection address issues of how people, power, and places intersect. They demonstrate not only the inextricable links between people and place but also show how power relationships are defined by spatial organization--and how this use of space has helped define the distinction between private and public. The essays examine a wide range of forms, from camp meetings to trolley cottages, to consider what buildings might reveal about their makers, users, and even interpreters. One article, for example, will give readers a new appreciation of balloon framing in Midwest farmhouses, refuting popular notions that it was a single individual's invention. Another considers servants' quarters in Apartheid-era South Africa to explore the relationship between black domestic workers and their white employers. Drawn from the Vernacular Architecture Forum conferences of 1996 and 1997, these thirteen essays make significant contributions to the study of design and building processes and the adaptation of architectural forms and spaces over time. They help redefine the scope of "vernacular" and provide new models for better understanding the built environment. The Editors: Sally McMurry is professor of history at Pennsylvania State University and author of Families and Farmhouses in Nineteenth-Century America. Annmarie Adams is associate professor of architecture at McGill University and author of Architecture in the Family Way: Doctors, Houses, and Women, 1870-1900.

American Heritage Society s Americana

If climbing stairs is a problem , Cheney's new Liberty Lifts for straight stairways let you ride comfortably and safely from ... Penn's Landing Trolley , line's last station was placed in ser- P.O. Box 7285 , Philadelphia 19101 , vice .

American Heritage Society s Americana

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Philadelphia Trolleys From Survival to Revival

SEPTA's trolley issues were not over, however. ... While they extended to parts of South Philadelphia, the core of those lines were north of Market Street, ...

Philadelphia Trolleys  From Survival to Revival

Author: Roger DuPuis II

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1467123889

Page: 96

View: 609

Using evocative photographs from private collections, Philadelphia Trolleys: From Survival to Revival carries readers on a nostalgic trip through nearly 50 years of transportation history, starting with the takeover of local transit service from the private sector by Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA). Sporting a rainbow of paint schemes in the 1970s, Philadelphia's fleet of streamlined 1940s trolley cars brought a welcome splash of color to gritty city streets. But more than a coat of paint was needed for America's largest surviving streetcar network, and SEPTA faced tough choices about how much to keep as aging vehicles and infrastructure desperately required renewal or replacement. Long-lived Presidents' Conference Committee (PCC) streamliners were retired, and SEPTA invested in Kawasaki light-rail vehicles, which are still serving Philadelphia commuters 35 years later. Many SEPTA PCC cars found new homes, from Maine to San Francisco--and, more recently, on SEPTA's own revived Girard Avenue line. The story comes full circle as SEPTA officials once again gear up to select a new generation of Philadelphia trolleys.

Tasting Freedom

Foner, Philip S. “The Battle to End Discrimination Against Negroes on Philadelphia Streetcars: (Part I) Background and Beginning of Battle.

Tasting Freedom

Author: Daniel R. Biddle

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 159213467X

Page: 616

View: 738

Octavius Valentine Catto was an orator who shared stages with Frederick Douglass, a second baseman on Philadelphia’s best black baseball team, a teacher at the city’s finest black school and an activist who fought in the state capital and on the streets for equal rights. With his racially-charged murder, the nation lost a civil rights pioneer—one who risked his life a century before Selma and Birmingham. In Tasting Freedom Murray Dubin and Pulitzer Prize winner Dan Biddle painstakingly chronicle the life of this charismatic black leader—a “free” black whose freedom was in name only. Born in the American south, where slavery permeated everyday life, he moved north where he joined the fight to be truly free—free to vote, go to school, ride on streetcars, play baseball and even participate in July 4th celebrations. Catto electrified a biracial audience in 1864 when he proclaimed, “There must come a change,” calling on free men and women to act and educate the newly freed slaves. With a group of other African Americans who called themselves a “band of brothers,” they challenged one injustice after another. Tasting Freedom presents the little-known stories of Catto and the men and women who struggled to change America.

Seeking El Dorado

African Americans in California Autry Museum of Western Heritage Lawrence B. De ... against Negroes on Philadelphia Streetcars,” in Philip S. Foner, ed., ...

Seeking El Dorado

Author: Autry Museum of Western Heritage

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295980834

Page: 537

View: 679

The author of In Search of the Racial Frontier examines the African-American migration to California, documenting the institutions, organizations, and cultural contributions made by blacks in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Simultaneous.

Railfan Railroad

Free rides and gifts for the kids free hot cocoa and cookloes . Hours 1 pm-4pm at the museum oft South Main Street across from Joe's Steak . For information phone 610 / 826-2580 or 908 / 859-1277 . ORRVILLE RAILROAD HERITAGE SOCIETY ...

Railfan   Railroad

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Cincinnati Streetcar Heritage

"Cincinnati Streetcar Heritage is a photographic essay of the Cincinnati, Ohio streetcar system.

Cincinnati Streetcar Heritage

Author: Kenneth C. Springirth

Publisher: America Through Time

ISBN: 9781634990332

Page: 128

View: 220

"Cincinnati Streetcar Heritage is a photographic essay of the Cincinnati, Ohio streetcar system. Cincinnati's first electric streetcar line was the conversion of the Mt. Adams & Eden Park Inclined Railway Company cable car line to electric operation in 1888, which became part of the Cincinnati Street Railway Company in 1896. Because of concern over corrosion of underground conduits and water pipes, Cincinnati's streetcar lines were required to have a double overhead wire within city limits. Cincinnati, along with Merrill, Wisconsin, and Havana, Cuba, were the only streetcar systems in North America with a double overhead wire system. Two open observation streetcars were placed in sightseeing service during 1939. The only Presidents' Conference Committee (PCC) cars ever built with two trolley poles were operated in Cincinnati. Although Cincinnati's streetcars made their last run in 1951, the Toronto Transit Commission purchased 52 of Cincinnati's PCC cars with the last one taken out of service in 1982. Cincinnati Streetcar Heritage documents the city's streetcar era, including the Cincinnati Bell Connector streetcar line which opened in 2016, linking downtown Cincinnati with the Over the Rhine neighborhood"--Back cover.

Streetcars of New Jersey

Its route started at Schellenger's Landing and went south along ... Perhaps it was in deference to its Philadelphia heritage or the influence of the West ...

Streetcars of New Jersey

Author: Joseph F. Eid, Jr.

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 098010260X

Page: 131

View: 618

This is Volume I of a 3 volume set. It chronicles the history of Streetcars in New Jersey, from the first horsecars to the modern day trolleys and light-rail cars. This volume covers the Atlantic Coast, organized by county, from Perth Amboy to Cape May. Photographs are included as well as routes and rosters for each company.