Mesoamerican Voices

Translated into English, these texts were written from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries by Nahuas from central Mexico, Mixtecs from Oaxaca, Maya from Yucatan, and other groups from Mexico and Guatemala.

Mesoamerican Voices

Author: Matthew Restall

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521012218

Page: 264

View: 818

Translated into English, these texts were written from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries by Nahuas from central Mexico, Mixtecs from Oaxaca, Maya from Yucatan, and other groups from Mexico and Guatemala. This collection provides college teachers and students access to important new sources for the history of Latin America and Native Americans. It is the first to present the translated writings of so many native groups and to address such a variety of topics, including conquest, government, land, household, society, gender, religion, writing, law, crime, and morality.

Mesoamerican Voices

Nevertheless , these changes did not destroy the integrity of the colonial Mesoamerican community . Each altepetl , ñuu , and cah maintained a distinct ...

Mesoamerican Voices

Author: Matthew Restall

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521812795

Page: 245

View: 701

A 2006 collection of indigenous-language writings from central Mexico and Guatemala, written during the colonial period.

The Oxford Handbook of Mesoamerican Archaeology

Mesoamerican Voices 2:1–31. Arnold, Philip J., III. 2009. Settlement and Subsistence among the Early Formative Gulf Olmec.

The Oxford Handbook of Mesoamerican Archaeology

Author: Deborah L. Nichols

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195390938

Page: 979

View: 456

The Oxford Handbook of Mesoamerican Archaeology provides a current and comprehensive guide to the recent and on-going archaeology of Mesoamerica. Though the emphasis is on prehispanic societies, this Handbook also includes coverage of important new work by archaeologists on the Colonial and Republican periods. Unique among recent works, the text brings together in a single volume article-length regional syntheses and topical overviews written by active scholars in the field of Mesoamerican archaeology. The first section of the Handbook provides an overview of recent history and trends of Mesoamerica and articles on national archaeology programs and practice in Central America and Mexico written by archaeologists from these countries. These are followed regional syntheses organized by time period, beginning with early hunter-gatherer societies and the first farmers of Mesoamerica and concluding with a discussion of the Spanish Conquest and frontiers and peripheries of Mesoamerica. Topical and comparative articles comprise the remainder of Handbook. They cover important dimensions of prehispanic societies—from ecology, economy, and environment to social and political relations—and discuss significant methodological contributions, such as geo-chemical source studies, as well as new theories and diverse theoretical perspectives. The Handbook concludes with a section on the archaeology of the Spanish conquest and the Colonial and Republican periods to connect the prehispanic, proto-historic, and historic periods. This volume will be a must-read for students and professional archaeologists, as well as other scholars including historians, art historians, geographers, and ethnographers with an interest in Mesoamerica.

The Neighborhood as a Social and Spatial Unit in Mesoamerican Cities

2005 City Size in late Postclassic Mesoamerica. ... Mesoamerican Voices 1:65–90. ... henry T. 1989 The rise of Civilization: Mesopotamia to Mesoamerica.

The Neighborhood as a Social and Spatial Unit in Mesoamerican Cities

Author: M. Charlotte Arnauld

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816599513

Page: 352

View: 287

Recent realizations that prehispanic cities in Mesoamerica were fundamentally different from western cities of the same period have led to increasing examination of the neighborhood as an intermediate unit at the heart of prehispanic urbanization. This book addresses the subject of neighborhoods in archaeology as analytical units between households and whole settlements. The contributions gathered here provide fieldwork data to document the existence of sociopolitically distinct neighborhoods within ancient Mesoamerican settlements, building upon recent advances in multi-scale archaeological studies of these communities. Chapters illustrate the cultural variation across Mesoamerica, including data and interpretations on several different cities with a thematic focus on regional contrasts. This topic is relatively new and complex, and this book is a strong contribution for three interwoven reasons. First, the long history of research on the “Teotihuacan barrios” is scrutinized and withstands the test of new evidence and comparison with other Mesoamerican cities. Second, Maya studies of dense settlement patterns are now mature enough to provide substantial case studies. Third, theoretical investigation of ancient urbanization all over the world is now more complex and open than it was before, giving relevance to Mesoamerican perspectives on ancient and modern societies in time and space. This volume will be of interest not only to scholars and student specialists of the Mesoamerican past but also to social scientists and urbanists looking to contrast ancient cultures worldwide.

The Unheard Voice of Law in Bartolom de Las Casas s Brev sima Relaci n de la Destruici n de las Indias

110 “Concerns over the Sale of Nahua Noble's Land, Tlaxcala, 1552,” in Mesoamerican Voices: Native-Language Writings from Colonial Mexico, Oaxaca, Yucatan, ...

The Unheard Voice of Law in Bartolom   de Las Casas   s Brev  sima Relaci  n de la Destruici  n de las Indias

Author: David T. Orique

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1000365344

Page: 380

View: 433

The Unheard Voice of Law in Bartolomé de las Casas’s Brevísima relación de la destruición de las Indias reinterprets Las Casas’s controversial treatise as a legal document, whose legal character is linked to civil and ecclesial genres of the Early Modern and late Renaissance juridical tradition. Bartolomé de las Casas proclaimed: "I have labored to inquire about, study, and discern the law; I have plumbed the depths and have reached the headwaters." The Unheard Voice also plumbs the depths of Las Casas’s voice of law in his widely read and highly controversial Brevísima relación—a legal document published and debated since the 16th century. This original reinterpretation of his Very Brief Account uncovers the juridical approach voiced in his defense of the Indigenous peoples of the Americas. The Unheard Voice innovatively asserts that the Brevísima relación’s legal character is intimately linked to civil and ecclesial genres of the late Renaissance juridical tradition. This paradigm-shifting book contextualizes the formation of Las Casas’s juridical voice in canon law and theology—initially as a secular cleric, subsequently as a Dominican friar, and finally as a diocesan bishop—and demonstrates how his experienced juridical voice fought for justice in trans-Atlantic debates about Indigenous peoples’ level of humanity, religious freedom, enslavement, and conquest. Reaching the headwaters of Las Casas’s hitherto unheard juridical voice of law in the Brevísima relación provides readers with a previously unheard interpretation—an appealing voice for readers and students of this powerful Early Modern text that still resonates today. The Unheard Voice of Law is a valuable companion text for many in the disciplines of literature, history, theology, law, and philosophy who read Bartolomé de las Casas’s Very Brief Account and study his life, labor, and legacy.

Without History

Reading Tezozomoc and Chimalpahin in the Mesoamerican institution of ... I have traced the insertion of Mesoamerican voices in the institutions of Latin ...

Without History

Author: Jose Rabasa

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 082297374X

Page: 369

View: 569

Rabasa offers new interpretations of the meaning of history from indigenous perspectives and develops the concept of a communal temporality that is not limited by time, but rather exists within the individual, community, and culture as a living knowledge that links both past and present. Rabasa recalls the works of Marx, Lenin, and Gramsci, and contemporary south Asian subalternists Ranajit Guha and Dipesh Chakrabarty, among others. He incorporates their conceptions of communality, insurgency, resistance to hegemonic governments, and the creation of autonomous spaces as strategies employed by indigenous groups around the globe, but goes further in defining these strategies as millennial and deeply rooted in Mesoamerican antiquity.

Constructing Power and Place in Mesoamerica

Mesoamerican Voices 3: 3–21. Gillespie, Susan D. 2000a “Beyond Kinship: An Introduction.” In Beyond Kinship: Social and Material Reproduction in House ...

Constructing Power and Place in Mesoamerica

Author: Merideth Paxton

Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

ISBN: 0826359078

Page: 256

View: 366

Identities of power and place, as expressed in paintings from the periods before and after the Spanish conquest of Mesoamerica, are the subject of this book of case studies from Central Mexico, Oaxaca, and the Maya area. These sophisticated, skillfully rendered images occur with architecture, in manuscripts, on large pieces of cloth, and on ceramics.

Islands in the Lake

125 Restall et al., Mesoamerican Voices, 69–70. Restall et al., Mesoamerican Voices, 69. 127 Restall et al., 208 Islands in the Lake.

Islands in the Lake

Author: Richard M. Conway

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316518892

Page: 337

View: 744

Thanks to creative uses of the environment, Xochimilco's residents preserved their culture and society in the face of colonial disruption.

Political Strategies in Pre Columbian Mesoamerica

Mesoamerican Voices 1: 5–22. Beekman, Christopher S. 2005a. “Agency, Collectivities, and Emergence: Social Theory and Agent Based Simulations.

Political Strategies in Pre Columbian Mesoamerica

Author: Sarah Kurnick

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607324164

Page: 288

View: 398

Political authority contains an inherent contradiction. Rulers must reinforce social inequality and bolster their own unique position at the top of the sociopolitical hierarchy, yet simultaneously emphasize social similarities and the commonalities shared by all. Political Strategies in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica explores the different and complex ways that those who exercised authority in the region confronted this contradiction. New data from a variety of well-known scholars in Mesoamerican archaeology reveal the creation, perpetuation, and contestation of politically authoritative relationships between rulers and subjects and between nobles and commoners. The contributions span the geographic breadth and temporal extent of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica—from Preclassic Oaxaca to the Classic Petén region of Guatemala to the Postclassic Michoacán—and the contributors weave together archaeological, epigraphic, and ethnohistoric data. Grappling with the questions of how those exercising authority convince others to follow and why individuals often choose to recognize and comply with authority, Political Strategies in Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica discusses why the study of political authority is both timely and significant, reviews how scholars have historically understood the operation of political authority, and proposes a new analytical framework to understand how rulers rule. Contributors include Sarah B. Barber, Joanne Baron, Christopher S. Beekman, Jeffrey Brzezinski, Bryce Davenport, Charles Golden, Takeshi Inomata, Arthur A. Joyce, Sarah Kurnick, Carlo J. Lucido, Simon Martin, Tatsuya Murakami, Helen Perlstein Pollard, and Víctor Salazar Chávez.

The Legacy of Mesoamerica

... Horcasitas 1972:125–135) NEW INDIAN WRITING IN MESOAMERICA In addition to the incorporation of Native Mesoamerican voices into the national literatures, ...

The Legacy of Mesoamerica

Author: Robert M. Carmack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317346793

Page: 512

View: 359

The Legacy of Mesoamerica: History and Culture of a Native American Civilization summarizes and integrates information on the origins, historical development, and current situations of the indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica. It describes their contributions from the development of Mesoamerican Civilization through 20th century and their influence in the world community. For courses on Mesoamerica (Middle America) taught in departments of anthropology, history, and Latin American Studies.

Colonial and Postcolonial Change in Mesoamerica

Mesoamerican Voices 2:63–76. McIntosh, Brandon M. 2014 Bird and Fish Remains from Isla Cilvituk: Evidence of Ecological and Market Niche Construction in a ...

Colonial and Postcolonial Change in Mesoamerica

Author: Rani T. Alexander

Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

ISBN: 0826359744

Page: 264

View: 555

This book offers a new account of human interaction and culture change for Mesoamerica that connects the present to the past. Social histories that assess the cultural upheavals between the Spanish invasion of Mesoamerica and the ethnographic present overlook the archaeological record, with its unique capacity to link local practices to global processes. To fill this gap, the authors weigh the material manifestations of the colonial and postcolonial trajectory in light of local, regional, and global historical processes that have unfolded over the last five hundred years. Research on a suite of issues—economic history, production of commodities, agrarian change, resistance, religious shifts, and sociocultural identity—demonstrates that the often shocking patterns observed today are historically contingent and culturally mediated, and therefore explainable. This book belongs to a new wave of scholarship that renders the past immediately relevant to the present, which Alexander and Kepecs see as one of archaeology’s most crucial goals.

Latin America in Colonial Times

SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING This chapter is designed in part to go with the documents presented in Mesoamerican Voices, edited by Matthew Restall, ...

Latin America in Colonial Times

Author: Matthew Restall

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108416403

Page: 320

View: 396

This second edition is a concise history of Latin America from the Aztecs and Incas to Independence.

Gale Researcher Guide for La Malinche and the Voice of Mesoamerican Women

... highlights Malinche's subversive power of speech, showing that while her story has been used to discourage women from claiming their voice, she provides ...

Gale Researcher Guide for  La Malinche and the Voice of Mesoamerican Women

Author: Kristina Downs

Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1535848162

Page: 8

View: 180

Gale Researcher Guide for: La Malinche and the Voice of Mesoamerican Women is selected from Gale's academic platform Gale Researcher. These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

Res

Mesoamerican Voices 2: 37–62. ... Dragon: A Study in Pre-Columbian Iconography, “ in Origins of Religious Art and Iconography in Preclassic Mesoamerica, ed.

Res

Author: Francesco Pellizzi

Publisher: Peabody Museum Press

ISBN: 0873658612

Page: 367

View: 387

This double volume of the renowned international journal of anthropology and comparative aesthetics includes “Aesthetics’ non-recyclable ground” by Félix Duque; “Seeing through dead eyes” by Jonathan Hay; “The hidden aesthetic of red in the painted tombs of Oaxaca” by Diana Magaloni; “A consideration of the quatrefoil motif in Preclassic Mesoamerica” by Julia Guernsey; “Hunters, Sufis, soldiers, and minstrels” by Cynthia Becker; “Figures fidjiennes” by Marc Rochette; “A sacred landscape” by Rachel Kousser; “Military architecture as a political tool in the Renaissance” by Francesco Benelli; “The icon as performer and as performative utterance” by Marie Gasper-Hulvat; “Image and site” by Jas’ Elsner; “Untimely objects” by Ara H. Merjian; “Max Ernst in Arizona” by Samantha Kavky; “Form as revolt” by Sebastian Zeidler; “Embodiments and art beliefs” by Filippo Fimiani; “The theft of the goddess Amba Mata” by Deborah Stein; and contributions to “Lectures, Documents and Discussions” by Gottfried Semper, Spyros Papapetros, Erwin Panofsky, Megan R. Luke, Francesco Paolo Adorno, and Remo Guidieri.

Native Diasporas

... eds., Mesoamerican Voices: NativeLanguage Writingsfrom Colonial Mexico,Oaxaca,Yucatan, and Guatemala (Cambridge: Cambridge UniversityPress, 2005). 3.

Native Diasporas

Author: Gregory D. Smithers

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803255306

Page: 592

View: 437

The arrival of European settlers in the Americas disrupted indigenous lifeways, and the effects of colonialism shattered Native communities. Forced migration and human trafficking created a diaspora of cultures, languages, and people. Gregory D. Smithers and Brooke N. Newman have gathered the work of leading scholars, including Bill Anthes, Duane Champagne, Daniel Cobb, Donald Fixico, and Joy Porter, among others, in examining an expansive range of Native peoples and the extent of their influences through reaggregation. These diverse and wide-ranging essays uncover indigenous understandings of self-identification, community, and culture through the speeches, cultural products, intimate relations, and political and legal practices of Native peoples. "Native Diasporas" explores how indigenous peoples forged a sense of identity and community amid the changes wrought by European colonialism in the Caribbean, the Pacific Islands, and the mainland Americas from the seventeenth through the twentieth century. Broad in scope and groundbreaking in the topics it explores, this volume presents fresh insights from scholars devoted to understanding Native American identity in meaningful and methodologically innovative ways.

The Teotihuacan Trinity

Mesoamerican Voices 115-22. BERLO, JANET C. 1983aConceptual Categories for the Study of Texts and Images in Mesoamerica. 1n Text and Image in Pre-Columbian ...

The Teotihuacan Trinity

Author: Annabeth Headrick

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292749872

Page: 230

View: 581

Northeast of modern-day Mexico City stand the remnants of one of the world's largest preindustrial cities, Teotihuacan. Monumental in scale, Teotihuacan is organized along a three-mile-long thoroughfare, the Avenue of the Dead, that leads up to the massive Pyramid of the Moon. Lining the avenue are numerous plazas and temples, which indicate that the city once housed a large population that engaged in complex rituals and ceremonies. Although scholars have studied Teotihuacan for over a century, the precise nature of its religious and political life has remained unclear, in part because no one has yet deciphered the glyphs that may explain much about the city's organization and belief systems. In this groundbreaking book, Annabeth Headrick analyzes Teotihuacan's art and architecture, in the light of archaeological data and Mesoamerican ethnography, to propose a new model for the city's social and political organization. Challenging the view that Teotihuacan was a peaceful city in which disparate groups united in an ideology of solidarity, Headrick instead identifies three social groups that competed for political power—rulers, kin-based groups led by influential lineage heads, and military orders that each had their own animal insignia. Her findings provide the most complete evidence to date that Teotihuacan had powerful rulers who allied with the military to maintain their authority in the face of challenges by the lineage heads. Headrick's analysis also underscores the importance of warfare in Teotihuacan society and clarifies significant aspects of its ritual life, including shamanism and an annual tree-raising ceremony that commemorated the Mesoamerican creation story.

Made to Order

“The House of New Fire at Teotihuacan and Its Legacy in Mesoamerica.” In The Art of Urbanism, ... Mesoamerican Voices 3: 35–52. Gazzola, Julie. 2009.

Made to Order

Author: Cynthia Conides

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806162112

Page: 256

View: 670

The ancient city of Teotihuacan, North America’s first metropolis, flourished for nearly eight centuries in central Mexico until its demise in 650 C.E. Known primarily for its massive architecture and monumental wall paintings, the city—and its dazzling artwork—inspired awe in its time, and continues to do so today. Made to Order, the first systematic study of more than 150 painted portable artworks produced in Teotihuacan, offers a unique, deeply informed perspective on the cultural practices and artistic techniques of the largest urban community in pre-Hispanic Mesoamerica. The painted vessels Cynthia Conides considers—featured here in finely reproduced full-color photographs—constitute nearly the entire body of material now available for analysis. With attention to their origins and provenance, wherever possible, the author views these objects from a range of vantage points, using ceramic chronologies to measure the changing characteristics and cultural significance of pictorial paintings on portable media. Her approach—ranging from stylistic analysis and narrative theory to theoretical perspectives on artistic exchange among artisans living and working in a thriving urban setting—reveals the importance of such objects to a city where social status, and the acquisition and display of its symbols, were paramount. This perspective is in turn grounded in new interpretations of the religious, social, and ritual contexts in which the objects functioned. The most complete analysis of both ceramics from excavations at Teotihuacan and those held in museum collections worldwide, Made to Order will become a standard source for specialists and students of pre-Columbian visual culture and archaeology, and a vital resource for those interested in cross-cultural ceramic studies.

Fanning the Sacred Flame

Mesoamerican Studies in Honor of H. B. Nicholson Matthew A. Boxt, ... Matthew, Lisa Sousa, and Kevin Terraciano 2005 Mesoamerican Voices: NativeLanguage ...

Fanning the Sacred Flame

Author: Matthew A. Boxt

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607321610

Page: 592

View: 910

Fanning the Sacred Flame: Mesoamerican Studies in Honor of H. B. Nicholson contains twenty-two original papers in tribute to H. B. "Nick" Nicholson, a pioneer of Mesoamerican research. His intellectual legacy is recognized by Mesoamerican archaeologists, art historians, ethnohistorians, and ethnographers--students, colleagues, and friends who derived inspiration and encouragement from him throughout their own careers. Each chapter, which presents original research inspired by Nicholson, pays tribute to the teacher, writer, lecturer, friend, and mentor who became a legend within his own lifetime. Covering all of Mesoamerica across all time periods, contributors include Patricia R. Anawalt, Alfredo López Austin, Anthony Aveni, Robert M. Carmack, David C. Grove, Richard D. Hansen, Leonardo López Luján, Kevin Terraciano, and more. Eloise Quiñones Keber provides a thorough biographical sketch, detailing Nicholson's academic and professional journey. Publication supported, in part, by The Patterson Foundation and several private donors.

The Oxford Handbook of Cities in World History

Matthew Restall, Lisa de Sousa, and Kevin Terraciano, Mesoamerican Voices (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995), 67. E. Kofi Agorsah, ed., ...

The Oxford Handbook of Cities in World History

Author: Peter Clark

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199589534

Page: 882

View: 985

In 2008 for the first time the majority of the planet's inhabitants lived in cities and towns. Becoming globally urban has been one of mankind's greatest collective achievements over time. Written by leading scholar, this is the first detailed survey of the world's cities and towns from ancient times to the present day.

The Oxford Handbook of the Aztecs

McVicker, Donald 2005 Notched Human Bones from Mesoamerica. Mesoamerican Voices 2:1–31. Millian, Alva Clarke 1981 The Iconography of Aztec Ceramic Figurines ...

The Oxford Handbook of the Aztecs

Author: Deborah L. Nichols

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190634162

Page: 592

View: 672

The Oxford Handbook of the Aztecs, the first of its kind, provides a current overview of recent research on the Aztec empire, the best documented prehispanic society in the Americas. Chapters span from the establishment of Aztec city-states to the encounter with the Spanish empire and the Colonial period that shaped the modern world. Articles in the Handbook take up new research trends and methodologies and current debates. The Handbook articles are divided into seven parts. Part I, Archaeology of the Aztecs, introduces the Aztecs, as well as Aztec studies today, including the recent practice of archaeology, ethnohistory, museum studies, and conservation. The articles in Part II, Historical Change, provide a long-term view of the Aztecs starting with important predecessors, the development of Aztec city-states and imperialism, and ending with a discussion of the encounter of the Aztec and Spanish empires. Articles also discuss Aztec notions of history, writing, and time. Part III, Landscapes and Places, describes the Aztec world in terms of its geography, ecology, and demography at varying scales from households to cities. Part IV, Economic and Social Relations in the Aztec Empire, discusses the ethnic complexity of the Aztec world and social and economic relations that have been a major focus of archaeology. Articles in Part V, Aztec Provinces, Friends, and Foes, focuses on the Aztec's dynamic relations with distant provinces, and empires and groups that resisted conquest, and even allied with the Spanish to overthrow the Aztec king. This is followed by Part VI, Ritual, Belief, and Religion, which examines the different beliefs and rituals that formed Aztec religion and their worldview, as well as the material culture of religious practice. The final section of the volume, Aztecs after the Conquest, carries the Aztecs through the post-conquest period, an increasingly important area of archaeological work, and considers the place of the Aztecs in the modern world.