The Duchesses

The Duchesses tells the story of the ‘Princess Coronation’ class of locomotives -the streamlined embodiments of raw, bulked-up muscle and formidable power that any enthusiast will tell you were the finest steam engines in Britain.

The Duchesses

Author: Andrew Roden

Publisher: Aurum

ISBN: 1781315531

Page: 256

View: 281

The Duchesses tells the story of the ‘Princess Coronation’ class of locomotives -the streamlined embodiments of raw, bulked-up muscle and formidable power that any enthusiast will tell you were the finest steam engines in Britain. Conceived of by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway to rival the LNER’s illustrious ‘A4 Pacifics’, these trains heralded in the last golden age of steam. Designed by the great William Stanier, theirs is a story of grand beginnings, a slow trajectory of decline and a recent, celebrated rebirth. Today, there are two ‘Duchesses’ still in existence: Duchess of Hamilton and Duchess of Sutherland are now restored to their original streamlined appearance. As The Duchesses’ beautiful cover illustration suggests, these Coronation locomotives were beautiful to behold; truly majestic feats of engineering. Andrew Roden’s book tells the story of their time in British Railways service; the class’ decommissioning in the 1960s; the extraordinary saga of two trains’ unlikely preservation by Billy Butlin at his holiday camps; and their eventual return to steam on the main line. The Duchesses completes a trilogy of railway books from Aurum, joining Mallard - the story of the world’s fastest steam locomotive - and Flying Scotsman –that of the world’s most famous.

London s Scottish Railways

In 1923, the multitude of British railway companies merged into four large groups; two of these had lines in Scotland.

London s Scottish Railways

Author: A. J. Mullay

Publisher: Tempus Pub Limited

ISBN:

Page: 157

View: 605

In 1923, the multitude of British railway companies merged into four large groups; two of these had lines in Scotland. They, the LMS and the LNER, were to have a profound affect on transport north of the border. The two "super companies" provided the Scottish public with rail services through the violence of the 1926 General Strike, the streamlined glamour of the 1930s, and the bombs and blackout of the Second World War.

British Railways in the 1960s

This series of books, 'The Geoff Plumb Collection', is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years.

British Railways in the 1960s

Author: Geoff M. Plumb

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 9781473823945

Page: 160

View: 603

After the Second War, Britains railways were rundown and worn out, requiring massive investment and modernisation. The Big Four railway companies were nationalized from 1948, and the newly formed British Railways embarked on a programme of building new Standard steam locomotives to replace older types. These started to come on stream from 1951. This programme was superseded by the 1955 scheme to dieselise and electrify many lines and so the last loco of the Standard types was built in 1960 and the steam locomotives had been swept entirely from the BR network by 1968. This series of books, 'The Geoff Plumb Collection', is a photographic account of those last few years of the steam locomotives, their decline and replacement during the transition years. Each book covers one of the former Big Four, the Southern Railway, London Midland & Scottish Railway, Great Western Railway and London & North Eastern Railway, including some pictures of the Scottish lines of the LMS and LNER. The books are not intended to convey a complete history of the railways but to illustrate how things were, to a certain extent, in the relatively recent past and impart some information through comprehensive captions, which give a sense of occasion often a last run of a locomotive type or over a stretch of line about to be closed down. The photos cover large parts of the country, though it was impossible to get everywhere given the overall timetable of just a few years mainly when the author was still a schoolboy with limited time and disposable income to get around. Pictures are of the highest quality that could be produced with the equipment then available, but they do reflect real life and real times. In simple terms, a look at a period not so long ago but now gone forever.

LONDON MIDLAND SCOTTISH

This unique work achieves it - and much more, combining detailed information scattered over books and magazines through decades, into a concise overview of what the company was about, and how it worked.

LONDON MIDLAND   SCOTTISH

Author: Bill Horsfall

Publisher: Author House

ISBN: 1496981782

Page: 406

View: 772

The London Midland & Scottish Railway, the LMS, Great Britain's largest from 1923-1947, has been extensively chronicled, but an update is long overdue. This unique work achieves it - and much more, combining detailed information scattered over books and magazines through decades, into a concise overview of what the company was about, and how it worked. Its analyses of locomotive-stock provide a further insight into methods of operation. The LMS pioneering work in both steam and diesel traction, plus that in other fields, put it ahead of Britain's other three railways, and for this it is here accorded the recognition it deserves. Fascinating, amusing, anecdotes give an insight into the staff's work-ethic and into contemporary social conditions. Key decisions by the LMS Executive to overcome the rivalry of its two largest constituents resulted in the appointment of an engineer who would create, not only modern, efficient locomotives and rolling-stock, but also an effective and unified design-team which would actually outlive the company and provide the spine of the four nationalized railways from 1948. The technical details, such as wheel notation (4-4-0 etc), boiler-pressures and valve-gears, are well within the ambit of railfans and complete the picture of this, Britain's greatest railway.

The London Midland and Scottish Railway Volume Two Preston to Carlisle

Carlisle Citadel Stanier Coronation class streamlined Pacific No. 6227 Duchess of Devonshire at Carlisle during the LMS period.

The London  Midland and Scottish Railway Volume Two Preston to Carlisle

Author: Stanley C. Jenkins

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445644142

Page: 128

View: 283

This fascinating selection of photographs traces some of the many ways in which the LMS line between Preston and Carlisle has changed and developed over the last century.

British Steam Pacific Power

London Midland & Scottish Railway 'Princess Coronation/Duchess' Class 4-6-2, designed by Stanier Introduced in 1937 the streamlined four-cylinder 'Princess ...

British Steam  Pacific Power

Author: Fred Kerr

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 1783469234

Page: 208

View: 255

Pacific, collectively a name applied to steam locomotives with a 4-6-2 wheel arrangement is perhaps more commonly associated with express passenger engines but that is not the whole story, there were also Pacific Tank Engines. The LNER is famously associated with their streamlined Gresley A4 Pacific locomotives and that most celebrated of locomotives, Flying Scotsman. The new build Pacific Tornado has raised the profile of the 4-6-2 type to even greater heights. The LMS produced powerful Pacific locomotives to a Stanier design; whilst the Southern Railway constructed Bullied air smoothed 4-6-2 engines. The GWR, who built Britains first Pacific type, actually entered the BR era without a 4-6-2 type on their stock list! However Riddles included 4-6-2 engines in his multi regional BR Standard range. The locomotive specifications are illustrated and presented in a manner which will appeal equally to enthusiasts, model makers and railway historians.

The Steam Train Quiz Book

With 100 brain teasing question and answers, on Steam Trains, and related topics, this quiz will test your in-depth knowledge of steam locomotives and their history!

The Steam Train Quiz Book

Author: Paul Andrews

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 1783338458

Page: 18

View: 602

With 100 brain teasing question and answers, on Steam Trains, and related topics, this quiz will test your in-depth knowledge of steam locomotives and their history!

Southern Steam

These included the work of such well-known designers as Dugald Drummond and Robert Urie of the London & South Western Railway, the Billintons and Earle Marsh of the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway, and Harry Wainwright and Richard ...

Southern Steam

Author: Brian J. Dickson

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780750966139

Page: 96

View: 948

Southern Steam

Railway Age

For the Canadian National Railways , E. E. Fairweather objected to any ... the London , Midland & Scottish famous train between London and Edinburgh , is to ...

Railway Age

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 277

The Final Years of London Midland Region Steam

Past & Present, LMS, 1925 Bolger, Paul, BR Steam Motive Power Depots. LMR, Ian Allan, 1981 Bonavia, Michael R., The Birth of British Rail, George Allen ...

The Final Years of London Midland Region Steam

Author: David Mather

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 1526770245

Page: 240

View: 734

The book investigates the vast number of locomotives that came to the London Midland Region in 1948 at Nationalisation. This is a class by class survey with over 200 illustrations, covering all the top link and freight classes, also looking at the smaller types of locomotive, operating on branch lines and doing more humble tasks. The author explores what happened to them and also looks at those that eventually made their way into preservation.

Loco Spotter s Guide

Since the 1800s locomotives have steamed, chugged and sparked their way into the nation's affections.

Loco Spotter   s Guide

Author: Stuart Black

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472820509

Page: 128

View: 178

Since the 1800s locomotives have steamed, chugged and sparked their way into the nation's affections. These powerful engines were the drivers of the Industrial Revolution, and to the present day carry passengers and freight to every corner of Britain. But do you know your Locomotion from your Rocket, or your Gresley Class A4 from your Princess Coronation Class? How heavy is the Flying Scotsman? And who designed the Britannia Class? The Loco Spotter's Guide answers all of these questions, with first-class illustrations portraying more than 60 of the most important steam, diesel and electric designs, including all-important specifications and technical details to aid any would-be loco spotter.

The Princess Royal Pacifics

... particularly on the lines from London to the North and Scotland, where the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) and the London and North Eastern ...

The Princess Royal Pacifics

Author: Tim Hillier-Graves

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473885809

Page: 224

View: 927

When Stanier joined the LMS in 1932, as their CME, he was expected to breathe new life into this ailing giant. Since its formation it had steadily lost ground to its main rival, the LNER. In Doncaster, Nigel Gresley and his team, with an eye to advancing locomotive design at the same time as making the company commercially successful, had quickly begun producing a series of high performance and iconic Pacific engines to pull their high profile express trains. Their impact left the LMS trailing in their wake.Under previous CMEs, the LMS had concentrated on 4-6-0 designs to pull their express services, but many felt they lacked sufficient power and had little to offer in performance or glamour when compared to their rivals.Stanier, heavily influenced by his mentor, George Churchward, his work on the GWR and the potential of the Pacific design, saw such a class as essential to the success of the LMS. And so the Princess Royal Class came into being, against a background of some opposition and cultural differences. Despite this, they proved their worth and became popular with their crew and managers. Within a few short years, however, their premier position in the company had been taken by a very worthy successor, the Princess Coronation Class.Overshadowed and often overlooked, they tend to be seen as a stepping stone to something better. Yet, in reality they stand up well to the closest scrutiny, and this book tells the story of these engines through the eyes of those who came into contact with them. They also best represent the impact William Stanier had on locomotive design and best describe the way he changed the culture of the LMS to allow it to grow successfully. It is a story of great endeavor and courage that can only be told by revealing and discussing political, social, economic and engineering issues.

LMS Steam at Euston Camden

Lone gone days are recaptured. A time when spotters chased up and down the platforms at Euston and at Camden Yard to record the arrivals and departures of steam-hauled express trains of the former London Midland & Scottish Railway.

LMS Steam at Euston   Camden

Author: Rod Steele

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445632799

Page: 160

View: 956

Lone gone days are recaptured. A time when spotters chased up and down the platforms at Euston and at Camden Yard to record the arrivals and departures of steam-hauled express trains of the former London Midland & Scottish Railway.

Military Connections

... carried by the Southern Railway (SR) 'Battle of Britain' class Pacific BR ... C.B.E. were built by the London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) between.

Military Connections

Author: Keith Langston

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473878551

Page: 224

View: 785

In Great Britain there existed a practice of naming steam railway locomotives. The names chosen covered many and varied subjects, however a large number of those represented direct links with military personnel, regiments, squadrons, naval vessels, aircraft, battles and associated historic events. Memorably the Southern Railway (SR) created a Battle of Britain class of Light Pacific locomotives, which were named in recognition of Battle of Britain squadrons, airfields, aircraft and personnel. The Great Western Railway (GWR) renamed some of its express passenger Castle Class engines after Second World War aircraft. Names were displayed in varying styles on both sides of the locomotives, additionally some nameplates were adorned with ornate crests and badges. Long after the demise of mainline steam, rescued nameplates are still much sort after collectors' items, which when offered for sale command high prices. This generously illustrated publication highlights the relevant steam locomotives at work and explains the origins of the military names.