Making Poetry Matter

Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. ... L. S. (1986) 'Those Who Understand: Knowledge Growth in Teaching', Educational Researcher, 15(2), 4– 14.

Making Poetry Matter

Author: Sue Dymoke

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441163530

Page: 240

View: 115

Making Poetry Matter draws together contributions from leading scholars in the field to offer a variety of perspectives on poetry pedagogy. A wide range of topics are covered including: - Teacher attitudes to teaching poetry in the urban primary classroom - Digital poetry and multimodality - Resistance to poetry in Post-16 English Throughout, the internationally recognised contributors draw on case studies to ensure that the theory is clearly linked to classroom practice. They consider the teaching and learning challenges that poetry presents for those working with learners aged between 5 and 19 and explore these challenges with reference to reading; writing; speaking and listening and the transformative nature of poetry in different contexts.

The School Librarian

O 19 918953 6 ; 918954 4 ; 918955 2 ; 918956 0 ; 918957 9 The library - classroom partnership is essential if ... based upon the secondary library media and information skills syllabus developed by New York State Education Department .

The School Librarian

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 677

Research on Teaching and Learning Probability

This book summarizes the vast amount of research related to teaching and learning probability that has been conducted for more than 50 years in a variety of disciplines.

Research on Teaching and Learning Probability

Author: Carmen Batanero

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319316246

Page: 33

View: 438

This book summarizes the vast amount of research related to teaching and learning probability that has been conducted for more than 50 years in a variety of disciplines. It begins with a synthesis of the most important probability interpretations throughout history: intuitive, classical, frequentist, subjective, logical propensity and axiomatic views. It discusses their possible applications, philosophical problems, as well as their potential and the level of interest they enjoy at different educational levels. Next, the book describes the main features of probabilistic thinking and reasoning, including the contrast to classical logic, probability language features, the role of intuitions, as well as paradoxes and the relevance of modeling. It presents an analysis of the differences between conditioning and causation, the variability expression in data as a sum of random and causal variations, as well as those of probabilistic versus statistical thinking. This is followed by an analysis of probability’s role and main presence in school curricula and an outline of the central expectations in recent curricular guidelines at the primary, secondary and high school level in several countries. This book classifies and discusses in detail the three different research periods on students’ and people’s intuitions and difficulties concerning probability: early research focused on cognitive development, a period of heuristics and biases programs, and the current period marked by a multitude of foci, approaches and theoretical frameworks.

Why Did Hitler Hate the Jews

However, as Peter den Hertog sets out in this book, such external, cultural and environmental factors were also experienced by most of Hitler's contemporaries, and they did not all turn into rabid Jew-haters.

Why Did Hitler Hate the Jews

Author: Peter Den Hertog

Publisher: Frontline Books

ISBN: 9781526772381

Page:

View: 521

What do we really know about the sources of Adolf Hitler's anti-Semitism? What led him to become such a genocidal anti-Semite?It is often said that the strongly anti-Semitic atmosphere in pre-war Vienna, in which Hitler failed to achieve his dream of becoming an artist, was when his hatred of the Jews first began to stir. We also often read that such feelings were compounded by the so-called 'stab in the back' by Jewish-Marxists at the end of the First World War, which led to Germany's humiliating capitulation. The Darwinian science of natural selection is often included in the debate as well, which to Hitler meant keeping the Germanic race 'pure' and untainted by the 'inferior' Jews.However, as Peter den Hertog sets out in this book, such external, cultural and environmental factors were also experienced by most of Hitler's contemporaries, and they did not all turn into rabid Jew-haters. In this study, the author investigates what we do know about the roots of the German leader's anti-Semitism. He also takes the significant step of mapping out what we do not know in detail. This allows the reader to understand which information needs to be looked for in the search for a complete explanation.Historians will be historians and so have their own way of looking at the world. This fails to provide us with complete clarity in this matter. That is why this study also employs insights from Psychology, Psychiatry and Forensic Psychiatry. Readers even take a trip 65 million years back in time to the field of Evolutionary Psychology. The author reveals how Hitler was a man with highly paranoid traits. The causes of this paranoia are clarified for the first time and its connection to Hitler's anti-Semitism is explained in depth. The author also explores, and answers, whether the Führer gave one specific instruction ordering the elimination of Europe's Jews, and, if so, when this took place.Peter den Hertog is able to provide an all-encompassing explanation for Hitler's anti-Semitism by combining insights from many different disciplines. He also succeeds in clarifying how Hitler's own particular brand of anti-Semitism could lead the way to the Holocaust.