Kinship in Ancient Athens

The work is arranged into two volumes, both utilizing the same anthropological approach to ancient sources.

Kinship in Ancient Athens

Author: S. C. Humphreys

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0191092401

Page: 1504

View: 225

The concept of kinship is at the heart of understanding not only the structure and development of a society, but also the day-to-day interactions of its citizens. Kinship in Ancient Athens aims to illuminate both of these issues by providing a comprehensive account of the structures and perceptions of kinship in Athenian society, covering the archaic and classical periods from Drakon and Solon up to Menander. Drawing on decades of research into a wide range of epigraphic, literary, and archaeological sources, and on S. C. Humphreys' expertise in the intersections between ancient history and anthropology, it not only puts a wealth of data at readers' fingertips, but subjects it to rigorous analysis. By utilizing an anthropological approach to reconstruct patterns of behaviour it is able to offer us an ethnographic 'thick description' of ancient Athenians' interaction with their kin that offers insights into a range of social contexts, from family life, rituals, and economic interactions, to legal matters, politics, warfare, and more. The work is arranged into two volumes, both utilizing the same anthropological approach to ancient sources. Volume I explores interactions and conflicts shaped by legal and economic constraints (adoption, guardianship, marriage, inheritance, property), as well as more optional relationships in the field of ritual (naming, rites de passage, funerals and commemoration, dedications, cultic associations) and political relationships, both formal (Assembly, Council) and informal (hetaireiai). Among several important and novel topics discussed are the sociological analysis of names and nicknames, the features of kin structure that advantaged or disadvantaged women in legal disputes, and the economic relations of dependence and independence between fathers and sons. Volume II deals with corporate groups recruited by patrifiliation and explores the role of kinship in these subdivisions of the citizen body: tribes and trittyes (both pre-Kleisthenic and Kleisthenic), phratries, genê, and demes. The section on the demes stresses variety rather than common features, and provides comprehensive information on location and prosopography in a tribally organized catalogue.

Kinship in Ancient Athens

Drawing on epigraphic, literary, and archaeological sources, 'Kinship in Ancient Athens' explores interactions between kin across a range of social contexts, from family life to legal matters, politics, and more.

Kinship in Ancient Athens

Author: Sarah C. Humphreys

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780191830204

Page:

View: 430

The concept of kinship is at the heart of understanding the structure of ancient Athenian society and the lives of its citizens. Drawing on epigraphic, literary, and archaeological sources, 'Kinship in Ancient Athens' explores interactions between kin across a range of social contexts, from family life to legal matters, politics, and more.

Kinship and Politics in Athens 600 400 B C

In ancient Athens kinship and politics were inseparable. This book studies that relationship through the methods of anthropology.

Kinship and Politics in Athens  600 400 B C

Author: Robert J. Littman

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN:

Page: 274

View: 508

In ancient Athens kinship and politics were inseparable. This book studies that relationship through the methods of anthropology. The political, social and religious systems of sixth and fifth century B.C. Athens are shown as functions of a patrilineal kinship system. In the earlier period the patrilineal kinship descent groups were the political system. As the city developed, the descent groups no longer defined the state, but their vitality persisted as politicians recruited their party members and allies from their own and allied kinship groups.

Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece

Papazoglou , Fanoula , Les Villes de Macédoine à l'époque Romaine , Athens : Ecole Française d'Athènes , 1988 . ... The oeuvre of Greek dramatists amply demonstrates the crucial part played by kinship and family in ancient times .

Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece

Author: Nigel Guy Wilson

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415973342

Page: 800

View: 882

Ancient Greek civilization, with its mythology, wars, philosophy and culture, has left an enduring legacy. This single volume, a spin-off from the acclaimed Encyclopedia of Greece and the Hellenic Tradition, provides a comprehensive and authoritative guide to the people, places, periods, events and themes of Ancient Greece.

The Birth of the Athenian Community

Undermining the current dominant approach, which seeks to explain ancient Athens in modern terms, dividing all Athenians into citizens and non-citizens, this book rationalizes the development of Athens, and other Greek poleis, as a ...

The Birth of the Athenian Community

Author: Sviatoslav Dmitriev

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351621440

Page: 392

View: 879

The Birth of the Athenian Community elucidates the social and political development of Athens in the sixth century, when, as a result of reforms by Solon and Cleisthenes (at the beginning and end of the sixth century, respectively), Athens turned into the most advanced and famous city, or polis, of the entire ancient Greek civilization. Undermining the current dominant approach, which seeks to explain ancient Athens in modern terms, dividing all Athenians into citizens and non-citizens, this book rationalizes the development of Athens, and other Greek poleis, as a gradually rising complexity, rather than a linear progression. The multidimensional social fabric of Athens was comprised of three major groups: the kinship community of the astoi, whose privileged status was due to their origins; the legal community of the politai, who enjoyed legal and social equality in the polis; and the political community of the demotai, or adult males with political rights. These communities only partially overlapped. Their evolving relationship determined the course of Athenian history, including Cleisthenes’ establishment of demokratia, which was originally, and for a long time, a kinship democracy, since it only belonged to qualified male astoi.

Kinship in Thucydides

This volume explores the relationship between Thucydides and ancient Greek historiography, sociology, and culture.

Kinship in Thucydides

Author: Maria Fragoulaki

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199697779

Page: 443

View: 585

This volume explores the relationship between Thucydides and ancient Greek historiography, sociology, and culture. Offering a new interpretation of the Peloponnesian War and its historian, it focuses on the role of emotions and ethics in the context of political history and ethnic conflicts. Drawing on modern anthropological enquiries on kinship and the sociology of ethnicity and emotions, and on scholarly work on kinship diplomacy and Greek ethnicity, it arguesthat inter-communal kinship has a far more pervasive importance in Thucydides than has so far been acknowledged. Through new readings of the History, such topics as Thucydides' narrative technique, hischallenging silences, his interaction with other genres, and his intense engagement with Herodotus are dissected and discussed - offering a new appreciation of his unique contribution to historiography.

Kinship Myth in Ancient Greece

In this detailed study, Lee E. Patterson elevates the current state of research on kinship myth to a consideration of the role it plays in the construction of political and cultural identity.

Kinship Myth in Ancient Greece

Author: Lee E. Patterson

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292739591

Page: 271

View: 535

In ancient Greece, interstate relations, such as in the formation of alliances, calls for assistance, exchanges of citizenship, and territorial conquest, were often grounded in mythical kinship. In these cases, the common ancestor was most often a legendary figure from whom both communities claimed descent. In this detailed study, Lee E. Patterson elevates the current state of research on kinship myth to a consideration of the role it plays in the construction of political and cultural identity. He draws examples both from the literary and epigraphical records and shows the fundamental difference between the two. He also expands his study into the question of Greek credulity—how much of these founding myths did they actually believe, and how much was just a useful fiction for diplomatic relations? Of central importance is the authority the Greeks gave to myth, whether to elaborate narratives or to a simple acknowledgment of an ancestor. Most Greeks could readily accept ties of interstate kinship even when local origin narratives could not be reconciled smoothly or when myths used to explain the link between communities were only "discovered" upon the actual occasion of diplomacy, because such claims had been given authority in the collective memory of the Greeks.

Household Interests

These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions.

Household Interests

Author: Cheryl Anne Cox

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400864690

Page: 276

View: 170

Household Interests is one of the first books to explore in-depth the nature of the Greek household (oikos) in classical Athens. Whereas the oikos traditionally has been defined as the household of the nuclear family in Greece, Cheryl Anne Cox reveals it as a much more fluid structure, taking care to distinguish between the concepts of "household" and "family." The legal basis of the typical elite household emerges as Cox describes marriage patterns or strategies among the families represented in Attic orations and funerary inscriptions: property interests were a strong motivating force, with the elite marrying within their kin, primarily through paternal lines in which property was transferred. The author ultimately shows that the household was not limited to "family" or kinspeople. Friends, neighbors, concubines or prostitutes, and slaves also shared in property interests and all could have a profound influence on the household. After first examining marriage patterns, Cox turns to inter-family relationships. Using anthropological sources and historical studies of European societies, she shows how property interest shaped often conflicted relations between parents and their children and among brothers, and yet it encouraged male charity toward sisters. Cox next considers how property transfer through adoption, guardianship, and remarriage, and the intervention of friends, concubines, and slaves, all contributed to expanding the boundaries of the household beyond kin. Originally published in 1998. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Reciprocity in Ancient Greece

LiPuma , E. ( 1988 ) , The Gift of Kinship : Structure and Practice in Maring Social Organization ( Cambridge ) . Littman , R. J. ( 1979 ) , ' Kinship in Athens ' , Ancient Society 10 : 5-31 . Lloyd , G. E. R. ( 1966 ) , Polarity and ...

Reciprocity in Ancient Greece

Author: Christopher Gill

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 9780198149972

Page: 370

View: 994

Reciprocity has been seen as an important notion for anthropologists studying economic and social relations, and this volume examines it in connection with Greek culture from Homer to the Hellenistic period.

Kinship Diplomacy in the Ancient World

In this study of the political uses of perceived kinship from the Homeric age to Byzantium, Jones provides an unparalleled view of mythic belief in action and addresses fundamental questions about communal and national identity.

Kinship Diplomacy in the Ancient World

Author: George Martin Lane Professor of the Classics and of History Emeritus Christopher P Jones

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674505278

Page: 193

View: 801

In this study of the political uses of perceived kinship from the Homeric age to Byzantium, Jones provides an unparalleled view of mythic belief in action and addresses fundamental questions about communal and national identity.

The Origins of Citizenship in Ancient Athens

mate intrusion of the public polis into the private oikos was the classical law that prescribed the conditions for marriage ... it was a phratry (a predemocratic kinship corporation) that “unofficially” registered most Athenian children ...

The Origins of Citizenship in Ancient Athens

Author: Philip Brook Manville

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400860830

Page: 280

View: 441

In this unusual synthesis of political and socio-economic history, Philip Manville demonstrates that citizenship for the Athenians was not merely a legal construct but rather a complex concept that was both an institution and a mode of social behavior. He further shows that it was not static, as most scholarship has assumed, but rather has slowly evolved over time. The work is also an explanation of the origins and development of the polis. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Unity Pulpit Boston

Then , when you come to a city like ancient Athens , still the notion of kinship is maintained , among the governing class at least . Even Plato , high a point as he had reached , held and taught explicitly that , while a man was under ...

Unity Pulpit  Boston

Author: Minot Judson Savage

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 468

Anthropology and the Greeks

The first section of the book deals with the history of the relationship of classical studies and anthropology.

Anthropology and the Greeks

Author: S.C. Humphreys

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136549846

Page: 376

View: 538

The first section of the book deals with the history of the relationship of classical studies and anthropology. In the second section the more material aspects of ancient Greek life are considered and the author relates the economic history of the period to new approaches in archaeology and economic anthropology. The place of kinship in the social structure of the Greek city-state; the social factors involved in the genesis of Greek philosophy; and the structural and institutional components of 'freedom' in classical Athens are all examined. First published in 1978.

Conceptions of Kinship

Genetic model was invented in the 20th century to accommodate knowledge about the mechanics of biological kinship ... Because of this series of similarities between family and kinship norms in ancient Judaism and classical Athens ...

Conceptions of Kinship

Author: Bernard Farber

Publisher: New York : Elsevier North Holland

ISBN:

Page: 250

View: 691

The Family in Greek History

This is an understanding that fits the Athenian concept of the city as the highest form of family.

The Family in Greek History

Author: Cynthia B. Patterson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674041925

Page: 304

View: 713

The family, Cynthia Patterson demonstrates, played a key role in the political changes that mark the history of ancient Greece. From the archaic society portrayed in Homer and Hesiod to the Hellenistic age, the private world of the family and household was integral with and essential to the civic realm. Early Greek society was rooted not in clans but in individual households, and a man's or woman's place in the larger community was determined by relationships within those households. The development of the city-state did not result in loss of the family's power and authority, Patterson argues; rather, the protection of household relationships was an important element of early public law. The interaction of civic and family concerns in classical Athens is neatly articulated by the examples of marriage and adultery laws. In law courts and in theater performances, violation of marital relationships was presented as a public danger, the adulterer as a sexual thief. This is an understanding that fits the Athenian concept of the city as the highest form of family. The suppression of the cities with the ascendancy of Alexander's empire led to a new resolution of the relationship between public and private authority: the concept of a community of households, which is clearly exemplified in Menander's plays. Undercutting common interpretations of Greek experience as evolving from clan to patriarchal state, Patterson's insightful analysis sheds new light on the role of men and women in Greek culture.

The Family Women and Death

4 The family in classical Athens : search for a perspective I Studying the family : between quantification and psychology When I decided to study kinship in ancient Athens , I did so partly because of an interest in the family as a ...

The Family  Women and Death

Author: S. C. Humphreys

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 220

View: 872

Study of public and private life in classical Athens.

A History of Marriage Systems

Ancient Israel , ancient Athens , and the chiefdoms of early medieval Switzerland , among many others , used the cone - like parentela system of reckoning kinship . In the parentela system all one's own descendants take precedence over ...

A History of Marriage Systems

Author: Gladys Robina Quale

Publisher: New York : Greenwood Press

ISBN:

Page: 399

View: 215

Readers seeking a historical and cross-cultural treatment of marriage and the family will not be disappointed by this book. A readable and comprehensive account of marriage, rich in colorful social history, Quale's work excels in the comparison of lines of development among the foremost cultures of the world. Particularly impressive in this regard is her treatment of the Eastern civilizations and how these differed from what demographic historians have come to call the `West European pattern' of marriage....Although written as a history, this book should be of interest to students of the family in the social sciences. While it is not a path-breaking work in the sense of providing significant novel conceptual or theoretical insights, it skillfully incorporates theoretical and empirical contributions from a multitude of disciplines. It devotes considerable attention to contemporary trends and consistently relates the institution of the family to the overall socioeconomic, political, and demographic contingencies within society....Quale has written an important book that contains a wealth of useful informaton and deserves serious consideration for use in graduate and undergraduate instruction. Journal of Marriage and the Family This is the first general worldwide history of marriage systems. Though it is comprehensive, it also uses contemporary American trends to illustrate broader tendencies in significant and sometimes dramatic ways. After going back to the earliest generations of human life to seek the roots of why and how human beings came to marry, it explores the various points in family life at which marriages are made, dissolved, and remade. It treats marriage systems as a basis for understanding how not only families, but whole societies operate. The functioning of a marriage system is perceived to be fully related to the overall economic and political situation within which families and individuals must make their way. The overall situation is looked at in a historical context, reflecting a condition of constant change. Quale traces the gradual modifications in patterns through the rise of agriculture and herding into commercial-urban societies and on to contemporary industrial-commercial life, comparing lines of development in the major regions of the world.