Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell

Gambler, journalist, fervent alcoholic and four-times married Jeffrey Bernard writes the "Low Life" column for the Spectator magazine chronicling Soho life as well as offering a very personal philosophy on vodka, women and race-courses.

Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell

Author: Keith Waterhouse

Publisher: Samuel French Limited

ISBN:

Page: 39

View: 997

Gambler, journalist, fervent alcoholic and four-times married Jeffrey Bernard writes the "Low Life" column for the Spectator magazine chronicling Soho life as well as offering a very personal philosophy on vodka, women and race-courses. From this, Keith Waterhouse has brilliantly constructed a play (the title being the euphemism used by the Spectator when Bernard is incapable of writing his column) which is set in the saloon bar of Bernard's favourite Soho pub, the Coach and Horses. Having passed out in the lavatory, Bernard awakes in the early hours of the morning to find himself alone and in the dark. Unable to contact the landlord, he is resigned to spending the rest of the night with a bottle of vodka and an endless chain of cigarettes, narrating a story of hilarious anecdotes and witty reminiscences which are enacted by two actors and two actresses who bring to life the various characters who populate Jeff 's world. Starring Peter O'Toole, later succeeded by Tom Conti then James Bolam, the play enjoyed a hugely successful run at the Apollo Theatre, London.

Low Life Irreverent Reflections from the Bottom of a Glass

Previously published in two volumes entitled Low Life: A Kind of Autobiography and Reach for the Ground, these books are now available in a single volume containing all his derisive reflections on life.

Low Life   Irreverent Reflections from the Bottom of a Glass

Author: Jeffrey Bernard

Publisher: Prelude Books

ISBN: 0715653598

Page: 304

View: 689

Described as the Tony Hancock of journalism, for forty years Bernard wrote only about himself and the failures of his life – with women, drink, doctors, horses – which have become legendary. Low Life is an irresistible collection of the best of Bernard's celebrated autobiographical contributions to The Spectator, once described as 'a suicide note in weekly instalments'. Previously published in two volumes entitled Low Life: A Kind of Autobiography and Reach for the Ground, these books are now available in a single volume containing all his derisive reflections on life. Antiauthoritarian, grumpy, charming, politically incorrect, funny, drunk and always mischievous, Bernard could usually be found at the Coach and Horses pub on London’s Greek street, a lit cigarette in his mouth and a drink in hand. He was joined by famous friends including Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Graham Green, Peter O’Toole, Ian Fleming and many others and their conversations – as well as with whomever was tending bar at the time – served as the basis for his writing. There were in fact times when he was too drunk to write, hence the famous "unwell" notice that went next to the large, hastily-sketched cartoon that filled its space in the magazine.

Low Life

Previously published in two volumes entitled Low Life: A Kind of Autobiography and Reach for the Ground, these books are now available in a single volume containing all his derisive reflections on life.

Low Life

Author: Jeffrey Bernard

Publisher: Prelude Books

ISBN: 0715649434

Page: 192

View: 103

Described as the Tony Hancock of journalism, for forty years Bernard wrote only about himself and the failures of his life – with women, drink, doctors, horses – which have become legendary. Low Life is an irresistible collection of the best of Bernard's celebrated autobiographical contributions to The Spectator once described as 'a suicide note in weekly instalments'. Previously published in two volumes entitled Low Life: A Kind of Autobiography and Reach for the Ground, these books are now available in a single volume containing all his derisive reflections on life. Antiauthoritarian, grumpy, charming, politically incorrect, funny, drunk and always mischievous, Bernard could usually be found at the Coach and Horses pub on London’s Greek street, a lit cigarette in his mouth and a drink in hand. He was joined by famous friends including Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Graham Green, Peter O’Toole, Ian Fleming and many others and their conversations – as well as with whomever was tending bar at the time – served as the basis for his writing. There were in fact times when he was too drunk to write, hence the famous "unwell" notice that went next to the large, hastily-sketched cartoon that filled its space in the magazine.

Reach for the Ground

For forty years Bernard wrote only about himself, and the tale of his life, loves and failures has become legendary.

Reach for the Ground

Author: Jeffrey Bernard

Publisher: Prelude Books

ISBN: 0715646761

Page: 685

View: 307

For forty years Bernard wrote only about himself, and the tale of his life, loves and failures has become legendary. Reach for the Ground is an irresistible collection of the best of Jeffrey Bernard's celebrated Low Life contributions to the Spectator. The column was once described as 'a suicide note in weekly installments' and became a national institution whose passing was noted with great sorrow. Peter O'Toole's affectionate introduction recalls a forty-year-old friendship and three sparkling autobiographical essays encapsulate the defining experiences of Bernard's life.

Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell play

Material in the Australian performing arts programs and ephemera (PROMPT) collection consists of programs and related items for Australian performing arts organisations, Australian artists performing overseas, professional productions ...

Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell  play

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 827

Material in the Australian performing arts programs and ephemera (PROMPT) collection consists of programs and related items for Australian performing arts organisations, Australian artists performing overseas, professional productions performed in Australia (including those featuring overseas performers) and overseas performances of Australian plays, music, etc.

Life After Death

Jeffrey Bernard pursued such an unusual existence , however , that his self - written ... the magazine would have to declare * Jeffrey Bernard is unwell .

Life After Death

Author: Nigel Starck

Publisher: Melbourne Univ. Publishing

ISBN: 9780522852561

Page: 256

View: 956

The obituary pages of our quality newspapers have been described as 'oases of calm in a world gone mad', 'a lovely part of the paper to linger in', and 'writing that matters'. Entertaining, inspiring and informative, they serve as a legitimate instrument of history, and have enjoyed an extraordinary revival in popularity over the past twenty years. Life After Death investigates-and celebrates-the development of the obituary form in the British, American, and Australian press. Author Nigel Starck tracks down the earliest exercise in obituary publication (in 1622), then traces the evolution of the form over four centuries, from times when the obituary was the reserve of royalty and privilege to its contemporary egalitarian mode. Along the way Dr Starck delves into a multitude of lives, from the heroic to the comic, the saintly to the downright villainous, the exemplary to the eccentric. Meet, in the posthumous cast list, Major Digby Tatham-Warter, of Britain's Parachute Regiment, who carried an umbrella into battle just in case it rained; the absent-minded Australian barrister Pat Lanigan, who drove from Canberra to Sydney and then flew back, leaving his car behind; and the eccentric American publisher Eddie Clontz, whose newspaper reported (exclusively, of course) that 'tiny terrorists' were disguising themselves as garden gnomes. Life After Death also incorporates a connoisseur's collection of ten obituaries reprinted in full: the subjects include Helen Keller, Diana Mosley, Quentin Crisp, George Wallace, and Rosa Parks. Without doubt, Life After Death is a book that will outlive its author-as an enduring celebration of journalism's dying art. 'Canon Smith expired after suffering an unfortunate disagreement with his bishop.'-The Sydney Morning Herald, 1882 'Minnesota Fats died at his home in Nashville. He was eighty-two, or perhaps ninety-five.'-The New York Times, 1996

Peter O Toole

Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. ... Directed by Val May The Plymouth Theatre, Broadway 1989 Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell by Keith Waterhouse.

Peter O Toole

Author: Robert Sellers

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0283072164

Page: 416

View: 161

Peter O'Toole was supremely talented, a unique leading man and one of the most charismatic and unpredictable actors of his generation. Described by Richard Burton as 'the most original actor to come out of Britain since the war', O'Toole regularly seemed to veer towards self-destruction. With the help of exclusive interviews with colleagues and close friends, Peter O'Toole: The Definitive Biography paints the first complete picture of this much loved man and reveals what drove him to extremes, why he drank to excess and hated authority. But it also describes a man who was fiercely intelligent, with a great sense of humour and huge energy. Always insightful, at times funny, at times deeply moving, this is a fitting tribute to an iconic actor who made a monumental contribution to theatre and cinema.

An A Z of Hellraisers

It was not unknown for his usual column to be replaced by the sad, solitary sentence: 'Jeffrey Bernard is unwell', polite prose for 'Jeffrey got too pissed ...

An A Z of Hellraisers

Author: Robert Sellers

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1409051005

Page: 448

View: 671

An A-Z of Hellraisers is the last word on inebriated misbehaviour, and the miscreant mob in this whopper of a book constitute the most amazing grouping to see print: from Alexander the Great, whose drunken revelries once ended with the destruction of an entire city; to W. C. Fields, who passed critical judgement on a brass band by urinating over them from a hotel balcony; Dylan Thomas, who drove a sports car onto Charlie Chaplin's private tennis court; to Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham, suffocating on his own vomit after consuming forty measures of vodka - what a night out that was! This hilarious volume makes for an ideal bedside companion or pub reading fodder, as it scrutinises and salutes these glorious individuals, from Winston Churchill to Keith Moon, George Best to Ernest Hemingway, Wild Bill Hickok to Sam Peckinpah, Ozzy Osbourne to Errol Flynn. Just thank God we didn't have to live next door to any of them.

Strolling Player

When Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell came out in 1989, Bernard was an obscure figure. Thanks to Waterhouse's skill, this sad old sot, whose jottings were ...

Strolling Player

Author: Gabriel Hershman

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750981873

Page: 288

View: 442

Albert Finney was a Salford-born, homework-hating bookie’s son who broke the social barriers of British film. He did his share of roistering, and yet outlived his contemporaries and dodged typecasting to become a five-time Oscar nominee and one of our most durable international stars. Bon vivant, perennial rebel, self-effacing character actor, charismatic charmer, mentor to a generation of working-class artists, a byword for professionalism, lover of horseflesh and female flesh – Albert Finney is all these things and more. Gabriel Hershman’s colourful and riveting account of Finney’s life and work, drawing on interviews with many of his directors and co-stars, examines how one of Britain’s greatest actors built a glittering career without sacrificing his integrity.

Tales from Soho

... Jeffery Bernard is Unwell, starring Peter O'Toole as Bernard. ... but the pub's landlord does not make an appearance, although Bernard is seen talking ...

Tales from Soho

Author: David Barry

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 1783338911

Page: 132

View: 658

Tales from Soho, eleven entertaining stories from London's famous square mile. Known as a red-light district, with a reputation for sleaze and crime, Soho is also a diverse district, a bohemian area which has been an adult playground for hundreds of years. In these stories you will meet countless motley characters over many decades. In 'The Poet in Soho' a famous Welsh writer goes on a Soho pub odyssey; and in 'The Spieler' a young actor risks a reckoning when he works in an illegal gambling den; as does one of Soho's duckers-and-divers in 'Ronnie's Manor'. From pimp and prostitute to a rock 'n' roll band at a Carnaby Street seance, Soho and its colourful characters comes alive over the years with this collection of earthy tales. The collection also contains a brief history of the district and some of its famous pubs.

The New Penguin Dictionary of Modern Quotations

2 Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell. Title of stage adaptation of Jeffrey Bernard's Spectator columns (1989). Referring to the Spectator's customary notice of the ...

The New Penguin Dictionary of Modern Quotations

Author: Robert Andrews

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141965312

Page: 720

View: 202

The New Penguin Dictionary of Modern Quotations contains over 8,000 quotations from 1914 to the present. As much a companion to the modern age as it is an entertaining and useful reference tool, it takes the reader on a tour of the wit and wisdom of the great and the good, from Margot Asquith to Monica Lewinsky, from George V to Boutros Boutros-Galli and Jonathan Aitken to Frank Zappa.

Theatreland

... he had swept stages and broken several actresses' hearts as a stage hand, while in later life he was portrayed on stage in Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell.

Theatreland

Author: Paul Ibell

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 144117835X

Page: 256

View: 243

Covering the five centuries from Shakespeare's Bankside playhouses to today's West End, Paul Ibell's Theatreland explores the history and current state of the London stage, taking the reader through the streets and alleyways of the theatre capital of the world. London's theatre district is quite literally built on the past. Although the book celebrates this, and the artistic achievements that still resonate today, it also emphasises that theatre is an art form that can only survive and flourish through fresh talent, new work and constant reinterpretation of old classics. Through a series of entertaining and engaging chapters on themes, personalities and trends, Theatreland reflects the effortless co-existence between past and present that is such a feature of London's theatre world, and shows how actors and producers, playwrights and publicists, theatre historians and modern architects, choreographers, critics and customers all play their part in ensuring that London remains the theatre capital of the world. Theatreland brings back to life the generations of actors, impresarios, princes and playwrights who created and shaped this cityscape, and describes how the 21st century theatre industry continues to develop and change.

Eccentric London

The pub interior became the setting for regular Keith Waterhouse's play Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell in 1989. Peter O'Toole , another customer , was the star .

Eccentric London

Author: Benedict Le Vay

Publisher: Bradt Travel Guides

ISBN: 9781841621937

Page: 320

View: 555

England's capital is a unique yet seriously strange and secret city. Benedict le Vay reveals London's most bizarre and macabre secrets with his novel approach, which doubles both as a thematic guide to the hidden attractions of the streets of London and a compelling insight into the citizens and culture of this historic city. Features include: *Eccentric Londoners *Eccentric shopping, pastimes and careers *Eccentric homes, gardens, and buildings