Great Western 0 6 2 Tank Classes

The book has nearly 40,000 words of text and around 300 black & white photographs.

Great Western  0 6 2 Tank Classes

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Locomotive Portfolios

ISBN: 9781526752055

Page:

View: 578

After tackling the GW pannier tanks in his 'Locomotive Portfolios' for Pen & Sword, author David Maidment seeks out descriptions and photographs of the GW 0-6-2 tank engines, the majority of which were built by the Rhymney, Taff Vale, Barry and other Welsh railways from the last decade or so of the nineteenth century onwards. The engines of eight different companies, absorbed by the GWR in 1922, are described and illustrated, and the way in which many were modernised and rebuilt at Swindon or Caerphilly Works in the 1920s. Charles Collett was, however, faced with a motive power crisis in the mining valleys at the Grouping, as many of the companies had economised on essential maintenance as the GW's take-over drew near, and he had to hurriedly design a standard 0-6-2T to complement and bolster their work as the powerful GW 2-8-0Ts were too heavy and wide for many of the Cardiff valleys. These engines, the 56XX & 66XX classes, became part of the South Wales scene between 1925 and 1964, mainly running the coal traffic between pits and docks, although they dominated Cardiff Valley passenger services until the influx of BR 3MT 2-6-2Ts and GW 41XX 2-6-2Ts in 1954/5. The book has nearly 40,000 words of text and around 300 black & white photographs.

Great Western County Classes

The Great Western Railway, had two classes of tender locomotives named after counties, the first class of two cylinder 4-4-0 tender locomotives, designed by George Jackson Churchward, were introduced in the 1900s to provide efficient motive ...

Great Western  County Classes

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 1526706393

Page: 224

View: 826

The Great Western Railway, had two classes of tender locomotives named after counties, the first class of two cylinder 4-4-0 tender locomotives, designed by George Jackson Churchward, were introduced in the 1900s to provide efficient motive power, including lines on the 'North & West' route between Hereford and Shrewsbury, owned jointly by the Great Western and L.N.W.R.The 4-4-0 counties were in service until the early 1930s, when they were withdrawn and replaced by more modern motive power.The 4-4-0 counties, were paralleled in design by the county 4-4-2 tanks, which operated suburban services in the London area and were also withdrawn in the early 1930s.In 1945, the Great Western Introduced the County 4-6-0 tender locomotives, designed by F W Hawksworth, these two cylinder machines had a high pressure boiler, that was meant to give the same tractive effort as a Castle class, 4-6-0, four cylinder locomotive,After modifications and boiler pressure reduction, the County class 4-6-0s, operated in express and semi fast train service, until the last members of the class were withdrawn in 1964.

Great Western 0 6 2 Tank Classes

Absorbed and Swindon Designed Classes David Maidment ... 136 149, 133 150, 104 151, 104 153,103 183, 280 • GREAT WESTERN, 0-6-2 TANK CLASSES.

Great Western  0 6 2 Tank Classes

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 1526752085

Page: 272

View: 594

After tackling the GW pannier tanks in his ‘Locomotive Portfolios’ for Pen & Sword, author David Maidment seeks out descriptions and photographs of the GW 0-6-2 tank engines, the majority of which were built by the Rhymney, Taff Vale, Barry and other Welsh railways from the last decade or so of the nineteenth century onwards. The engines of eight different companies, absorbed by the GWR in 1922, are described and illustrated, and the way in which many were modernised and rebuilt at Swindon or Caerphilly Works in the 1920s. Charles Collett was, however, faced with a motive power crisis in the mining valleys at the Grouping, as many of the companies had economised on essential maintenance as the GW’s take-over drew near, and he had to hurriedly design a standard 0-6-2T to complement and bolster their work as the powerful GW 2-8-0Ts were too heavy and wide for many of the Cardiff valleys. These engines, the 56XX & 66XX classes, became part of the South Wales scene between 1925 and 1964, mainly running the coal traffic between pits and docks, although they dominated Cardiff Valley passenger services until the influx of BR 3MT 2-6-2Ts and GW 41XX 2-6-2Ts in 1954/5. The book has nearly 40,000 words of text and around 300 black & white photographs.

Great Western Pannier Tank Classes

Rhymney Railway: Class 57 0-6-2ST, 1890-1900 (GW 87-148) Vulcan Foundry built five doubleframed 0-6-2 saddle tanks, numbered 57-61, in 1890 – an extended ...

Great Western Pannier Tank Classes

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1526734524

Page: 368

View: 307

This comprehensive and fully illustrated history presents an in-depth look at the Great Western Railway’s various pannier tank engines. Though hauling freight was a vital part of Great Western Railway’s history—and where it made the majority of its profit—there are few books devoted to the stout, powerful engines that did the work. In Great Western, Pannier Tank Classes, British Railways expert David Maidment corrects that oversight. This volume explores the large number of 0-6-0 saddle tanks built for both the Great Western Railway and the independent railway companies in South Wales, most of which were converted to pannier tanks in the Churchward and Collett eras. While covering the Armstrong and Dean engines in detail, Maidment goes on to describe the design, construction and operation of the largest class of steam engines built in the UK in the last century: Charles Collett’s GWR 5700 class, examples of which were still being built after nationalization. Collett also designed pannier tank engines for branch passenger and freight work, and his successor Frederick Hawksworth continued the GW tradition with a tapered boiler version. All of these are discussed in depth in terms of their design and service. A concluding chapter covers further designs that were never built.

Great Western King Class 4 6 0s

... Pen & Sword, 2015 Great Western Eight-Coupled Heavy Freight Locomotives, ... Pen & Sword, 2019 Great Western, 0-6-2 Tank Classes, Pen & Sword, ...

Great Western  King Class 4 6 0s

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Pen and Sword Transport

ISBN: 1526739860

Page: 272

View: 965

Built by Collett in 1927 after pressure to restore the GWR’s pre-eminence in motive power and cope with increasing traffic post-war to the Devon and Cornwall holiday resorts, the thirty Kings were the final development of the Churchward Stars and the 1923 Castles and remained on top-link main line duty until their final replacement by the ‘Western’ class 52 diesel hydraulics in 1962. The book includes an insight into the thinking of some of Collett’s senior staff at the end of the 1930s and the eventual transformation in the latter years with redraughting and double chimneys. As well as describing their design and construction, the book covers comprehensively their operation and performance backed up by many recorded logs on all main GW/WR routes over which they were permitted. The author had close experience of the class when working at Old Oak Common between 1957 and 1962 and includes a chapter of his experiences with them including many footplate trips (as a management trainee, he was greeted with glee by many firemen who would hand him the shovel). The book includes over 300 photographs of which 100 are in color.

An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive Development

CHAPTER 7 Eight Wheeled Tank Engines Four Coupled Classes GWR Classes No. ... The 56XX 0-6-2 tanks, built under Collett, had quite a resemblance to the 36XX ...

An Introduction to Great Western Locomotive Development

Author: Jim Champ

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473877857

Page: 360

View: 408

The first thought, when contemplating a new study of the Great Western Railway locomotive fleet, must surely be to ask what can there be left to say? But there is no single source which gives a general introduction to the Great Western locomotive fleet. There are monographs on individual classes, an excellent multi-volume detail study from the RCTS, and superb collections of photographs, but nothing that brings it all together. This work is intended to provide that general introduction.The volume begins with a series of short essays covering general trends in design development, whilst the main body of the volume covers individual classes. For each class there is a small table containing some principal dimensions and paragraphs of text, covering an introduction, renumbering, key changes in the development of the class and information on withdrawal.The volume concludes with appendices covering the development and types of standard boilers, the various numbering schemes used by the GWR, the arcane subject of locomotive diagrams and lot numbers, and a short reference on the many lines the GWR engulfed.The majority of illustrations are new profile drawings to a consistent format. Described as sketches, they are drawn to a consistent scale, but do not claim to be scale drawings. Much minor equipment has been omitted and the author has certainly not dared to include rivets! Although most are based around GWR weight diagrams, they are not simple traces of the original drawings. Detail has been added from other sources, components copied from different drawings and details have been checked against historical and modern photographs. One must also bear in mind that steam locomotives were not mass produced. Minor fittings frequently varied in position and changes were made over the locomotives' lifetimes. Nevertheless, this collection of drawings provides a uniquely consistent view of the GWR locomotive fleet.

Great Western Small Wheeled Double Framed 4 4 0 Tender Locomotives

Duke, Bulldog, Dukedog and '3521' Classes David Maidment ... six standard locomotive classes, a 2-8-0, two 46-0s, a 4-4-0, a 2-6-2 tank, and a 4-4-2 tank.

Great Western Small Wheeled Double Framed 4 4 0 Tender Locomotives

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 1473896479

Page: 256

View: 890

The Great Western Railway experienced the trauma and disruption of the end of the broad gauge in 1892 and were faced with equipping the network with suitable motive power, especially in Devon and Cornwall where the last track conversion had taken place. West of Newton Abbot, the GWR had relied on a variety of 4-4-0, 2-4-0, 0-4-2 and 0-4-4 side and saddle tanks, often doubled-headed, and Dean set about designing a sturdy outside-framed powerful 4-4-0 with 5ft 8in coupled wheels, the 'Dukes', to tackle increasing loads over the heavily graded main line. Then, Churchward came to assist the ailing Locomotive Superintendent, using his knowledge and experience of American and continental practice to develop the Dean designs. He improved the efficiency and performance of the boilers, using the Belgian Belpaire firebox, then developed the tapered 'cone' boiler, and applied it to the chassis of the 'Duke's to form the 'Camel' class, later known as the 'Bulldogs', which eventually numbered 156 locomotives. Finally, in the 1930s when engines of the 'Duke' route availability were still required but their frames were life-expired, their boilers were matched with the stronger frames of the 'Bulldogs' to form the 'Dukedog' class, which lasted until the 1950s, particularly on the former Cambrian lines in mid-Wales. This book recounts the design, construction and operation of these small-wheeled outside-framed locomotives with many rare photos of their operation in the first decade of the twentieth century as well as in more recent times.

Modelling the Great Western Branch Lines

... classes: the Forrest of Dean was almost exclusively worked by pannier tanks, while the short, steep branches of South Wales were mostly worked by 0-6-2 ...

Modelling the Great Western Branch Lines

Author: Chris Ford

Publisher: The Crowood Press

ISBN: 1785005669

Page: 192

View: 932

Modelling the Great Western Branch Lines is essential reading for all those who wish to build a model railway based on the branch lines of the Great Western Railway. The author guides the modeller through projects which are graded from simple to more advance. Each step is clearly described, explaining the techniques used and how alternative methods and materials could be employed. Topics covered include a historical overview of the subject; full listings of all tools and materials; a series of detailed model projects using the best of the currently available commercial model making products; an introduction to scratch-building lineside terms and, finally, suggestions as to how each project could be further developed. It is superbly illustrated with 234 colour and black & white photographs giving step-by-step techniques. Chris Ford has been a keen railway modeller since childhood; many of his model layouts feature in the model railway press.

The Railway News

2-6-0 Express Coods Engine with Tender : South - Eastern and ... 4-6-2T , 0-8-2T , and some rebuilding and conversion work ; Great Western Railway - 2-6-0 ...

The Railway News

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 265

The Great Western Railway

King " heavy passenger 4-6-0 “ Castle " class " Star " “ Saint ... with outside cylinders The heavy 0-6-2 tanks " 5600 " and “ 6600 " classes Generally same ...

The Great Western Railway

Author: Oswald Stevens Nock

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 185

View: 945

The Engineer

1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , and 6 - is a frame attached the sections were put in . Care should therefore be taken that the this cause . to the sides of the tank ...

The Engineer

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 195

The Last Survivor

In 1924 the Great Western Railway introduced their own design of 0-6-2 mixed - traffic side - tank locomotives to work the South Wales Valleys ' traffic .

The Last Survivor

Author: Stuart Owen-Jones

Publisher: National Museum Wales

ISBN: 9780720003413

Page: 27

View: 468

The history of Locomotive No. 28, the sole survivor in original condition of the Taff Vale locomotives.

Southern Railway

The book is lavishly illustrated with over 300 black and white and thirty colour photographs.

Southern Railway

Author: David Maidment

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1526732149

Page: 240

View: 309

Southern Maunsell Moguls and Tank Engines is a volume in the series of Locomotive Profiles being published by Pen & Sword. It describes the conception, design and construction of the two- and three-cylinder 2-6-0s initially the Ns constructed at the end of the First World War, many at government initiative by the Woolwich Arsenal and their three-cylinder variants, the N1s. It also describes in similar fashion the class K River 2-6-4 tank engines, their riding problems and the decision to convert them as class U two-cylinder moguls after the disastrous Sevenoaks derailment in 1927. The solitary K1 three-cylinder 2-6-4T was similarly converted as the prototype three-cylinder U1 with new build Us and U1s following in the early 1930s.The moguls, originally built by Richard Maunsell for the South Eastern & Chatham Railway, became the standard mixed traffic locomotives throughout the Southern Railway for virtually the whole of its existence and many remained until near the end of BR Southern Regions steam stock in 1965/6.After the experience with the passenger 2-6-4 tank engines, Maunsell restricted his larger tank engine designs to freight work the class W for heavy cross-London interchange freight traffic and the Z0-8-0T for heavy shunting and banking work. Maunsell also redesigned some elderly LB&SCR E1 0-6-0Ts for branch line work in rural Devon and North Cornwall, providing a radial axle as 0-6-2T class E1/R.The book covers the allocation, operation and performance of these classes and includes some personal reminiscences of the author who experienced the moguls at first hand. It also covers the sale of some of the Woolwich moguls to the CIE in Ireland and the conversion of a number to 2-6-4 freight tank engines for the Metropolitan Railway. The book is lavishly illustrated with over 300 black and white and thirty colour photographs.