Grand Theft Childhood

In Grand Theft Childhood: The Surprising Truth about Violent Video Games and What Parents Can Do, Kutner and Olson untangle the web of politics, marketing, advocacy and flawed or misconstrued studies that until now have shaped parents' ...

Grand Theft Childhood

Author: Lawrence Kutner

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416564691

Page: 272

View: 615

Listening to pundits and politicians, you'd think that the relationship between violent video games and aggressive behavior in children is clear. Children who play violent video games are more likely to be socially isolated and have poor interpersonal skills. Violent games can trigger real-world violence. The best way to protect our kids is to keep them away from games such as Grand Theft Auto that are rated M for Mature. Right? Wrong. In fact, many parents are worried about the wrong things! In 2004, Lawrence Kutner, PhD, and Cheryl K. Olson, ScD, cofounders and directors of the Harvard Medical School Center for Mental Health and Media, began a $1.5 million federally funded study on the effects of video games. In contrast to previous research, their study focused on real children and families in real situations. What they found surprised, encouraged and sometimes disturbed them: their findings conform to the views of neither the alarmists nor the video game industry boosters. In Grand Theft Childhood: The Surprising Truth about Violent Video Games and What Parents Can Do, Kutner and Olson untangle the web of politics, marketing, advocacy and flawed or misconstrued studies that until now have shaped parents' concerns. Instead of offering a one-size-fits-all prescription, Grand Theft Childhood gives the information you need to decide how you want to handle this sensitive issue in your own family. You'll learn when -- and what kinds of -- video games can be harmful, when they can serve as important social or learning tools and how to create and enforce game-playing rules in your household. You'll find out what's really in the games your children play and when to worry about your children playing with strangers on the Internet. You'll understand how games are rated, how to make best use of ratings and the potentially important information that ratings don't provide. Grand Theft Childhood takes video games out of the political and media arenas, and puts parents back in control. It should be required reading for all families who use game consoles or computers. Almost all children today play video or computer games. Half of twelve-year-olds regularly play violent, Mature-rated games. And parents are worried... "I don't know if it's an addiction, but my son is just glued to it. It's the same with my daughter with her computer...and I can't be watching both of them all the time, to see if they're talking to strangers or if someone is getting killed in the other room on the PlayStation. It's just nerve-racking!" "I'm concerned that this game playing is just the kid and the TV screen...how is this going to affect his social skills?" "I'm not concerned about the violence; I'm concerned about the way they portray the violence. It's not accidental; it's intentional. They're just out to kill people in some of these games." What should we as parents, teachers and public policy makers be concerned about? The real risks are subtle and aren't just about gore or sex. Video games don't affect all children in the same way; some children are at significantly greater risk. (You may be surprised to learn which ones!) Grand Theft Childhood gives parents practical, research-based advice on ways to limit many of those risks. It also shows how video games -- even violent games -- can benefit children and families in unexpected ways. In this groundbreaking and timely book, Drs. Lawrence Kutner and Cheryl Olson cut through the myths and hysteria, and reveal the surprising truth about kids and violent games.

Game Play

"Shows how playing games can promote socialization, encourage the development of identity and self-esteem and help individuals master anxiety- while setting the stage for deeper therapeutic intervention in subsequent sessions." --Cover.

Game Play

Author: Charles E. Schaefer

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Page: 406

View: 629

"Shows how playing games can promote socialization, encourage the development of identity and self-esteem and help individuals master anxiety- while setting the stage for deeper therapeutic intervention in subsequent sessions." --Cover.

Games from Childhood

You'll enjoy re-living your childhood as you test your logic and reasoning and enjoy playing these wonderful games.

Games from Childhood

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781782437215

Page: 128

View: 691

A wonderfully nostalgic collection of the games we played in our childhood, when all you needed was a pen, paper and your imagination. All the classics are here from filling in the grids of battleships and hangman, to noughts and crosses, categories, crossed words, fortune teller and more besides, all presented in a gorgeous vintage style. The perfect antidote to our modern, digital world, you'll enjoy re-living your childhood as you test your logic and reasoning and have fun playing these wonderful games.

Let s Play

An energetic collection of traditional games includes well-known favorites such as hopscotch, jacks, and marbles, as well as new games such as sardines. By the illustrator of The Enormous Potato. Reprint.

Let s Play

Author: Camilla Gryski

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781550748178

Page: 48

View: 436

An energetic collection of traditional games includes well-known favorites such as hopscotch, jacks, and marbles, as well as new games such as sardines. By the illustrator of The Enormous Potato. Reprint.

Children s Games in the New Media Age

The result of a unique research project exploring the relationship between children's vernacular play cultures and their media-based play, this collection challenges two popular misconceptions about children's play: that it is depleted or ...

Children s Games in the New Media Age

Author: Dr Chris Richards

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472401468

Page: 238

View: 940

The result of a unique research project exploring the relationship between children's vernacular play cultures and their media-based play, this collection challenges two popular misconceptions about children's play: that it is depleted or even dying out and that it is threatened by contemporary media such as television and computer games. A key element in the research was the digitization and analysis of Iona and Peter Opie's sound recordings of children's playground and street games from the 1970s and 1980s. This framed and enabled the research team's studies both of the Opies' documents of mid-twentieth-century play culture and, through a two-year ethnographic study of play and games in two primary school playgrounds, contemporary children's play cultures. In addition the research included the use of a prototype computer game to capture playground games and the making of a documentary film. Drawing on this extraordinary data set, the volume poses three questions: What do these hitherto unseen sources reveal about the games, songs and rhymes the Opies and others collected in the mid-twentieth century? What has happened to these vernacular forms? How are the forms of vernacular play that are transmitted in playgrounds, homes and streets transfigured in the new media age? In addressing these questions, the contributors reflect on the changing face of childhood in the twenty-first century - in relation to questions of gender and power and with attention to the children's own participation in producing the ethnographic record of their lives.

How We Played

From ancient board games to childhood pastimes of the Middle Ages through to the street games of the 1950s and 1960s and the experience of children in the current decade, in How We Played Caroline Goodfellow delves into the differences in ...

How We Played

Author: Caroline Goodfellow

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0752489828

Page: 192

View: 330

Games make up a huge part of childhood, and memories of specific games stay with us throughout our lives. They form an integral part of growing up and stimulate imagination and creativity. From ancient board games to childhood pastimes of the Middle Ages through to the street games of the 1950s and 1960s and the experience of children in the current decade, in How We Played Caroline Goodfellow delves into the differences in games over time and region. Bound to awaken distant memories of childhood, her history of this most pleasurable of subjects transports the reader to another time, and is a nostalgic look at how we played.

The Value of Games

This work brings together a collection of games that have been a part of childhood through the ages, games that continue to be played in various forms around the world.

The Value of Games

Author: Kaye Bennett Dotson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 147584641X

Page: 150

View: 899

This work brings together a collection of games that have been a part of childhood through the ages, games that continue to be played in various forms around the world. Many anthologies of folktales, music, and other forms of art have been collected for readers, but there are not many works on the subject of traditional childhood games and their role in the important “work” of childhood, which is in fact play. This book helps to meet a growing interest among educators and parents to encourage natural play and creativity in a world that is increasingly digital. Directions, descriptions, illustrations, of traditional childhood games, supported by educational theory are included. The material covered will not only help parents and educators to support children in play, but will also provide an anthology for consultation by those who see the need to preserve traditional play long associated with childhood.

Lullabies to Circle Games

Game directions and teaching suggestions are provided for EVERY song, rhyme and activity in the book.

Lullabies to Circle Games

Author: Jo Kirk

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781646690084

Page: 113

View: 243

Lullabies to Circle Games: An Early Childhood Music & Movement Curriculum by Jo Kirk. This curriculum is jammed packed with joy-filled time-tested/classroom-tested music and movement experiences for children, birth through Pre-K and early elementary school. It is designed for parents, early childhood specialist and music & movement educators. It offers teaching tips, approaches for leading a song or rhyme, methods for teaching a song by rote, "greeting" songs, choosing songs & rhymes, and song that incorporate the child's name. Special attention is directed to (a) a movement sequence that provides greater movement success for the child, (b) the vocal and rhythmic development of the child, and (c) suggested ways to use simple percussion instruments to enhance the child's musical ear and awareness. This developmentally appropriate curriculum is organized by 1-12 month (passive stage of learning), 13-24 month (transitional stage of learning), 2-3 years (active stage of learning), 4-5 years and school age through 3rd or 4th grade (early musical literacy focus). Game directions and teaching suggestions are provided for EVERY song, rhyme and activity in the book. The 1-12-month curriculum connects the caregiver and child in joy-filled one-on-one musical experiences through bonces, wiggles, tickles, taps, claps, use of simple percussion instruments, easy to sing songs, fostering movement exploration, movement to recordings and lullabies. The 13-24-month curriculum contains vigorous bounces, delightful wiggles, beginning finger plays & tickles, claps, songs for movement exploration, taps, easy to sing songs, use of simple percussion instruments, beginning circle games, lullabies, songs for listening, and movement to recordings that the child and teacher/caregiver can share together as well as side-by-side. The 2-3-year curriculum includes finger plays, action songs, activities & songs with the steady beat, songs for independent singing: fill in the blank, echoing and resting tone, active movement exploration, circle games, and songs for listening which motivate the child toward independent exploration. The 4-5-year & school age curriculum actively leads the child through sophisticated finger plays and action songs, steady beat activities, simple songs, movement exploration and complex circle games, fun-filled opportunities for independent singing and creative movement to recorded music that challenges the imagination.

Children s Use of Board Games in Psychotherapy

Both show unconscious content, defensive needs, and interpersonal and transferential relationships. As therapists, we can search for the same underlying dynamics we would look for in these other symbolic expressions.".

Children s Use of Board Games in Psychotherapy

Author: Jill Bellinson

Publisher: Jason Aronson

ISBN:

Page: 184

View: 797

Both show unconscious content, defensive needs, and interpersonal and transferential relationships. As therapists, we can search for the same underlying dynamics we would look for in these other symbolic expressions.".

Everyday Games for Children

Play activities for this age group call for simple story plays , dramatic games ,
singing games , and rhythmic activities . ( b ) Six to eight . During these years
there is an overlapping of play activities characteristic of early childhood and
those ...

Everyday Games for Children

Author: Carl A. Troester

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 322

View: 310

Children and Games in the Middle Ages

Describes the life of children in medieval times, their games, pastimes, education, and the ways in which they were prepared for different roles in medieval society.

Children and Games in the Middle Ages

Author: Lynne Elliott

Publisher: Crabtree Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780778713494

Page: 32

View: 582

Describes the life of children in medieval times, their games, pastimes, education, and the ways in which they were prepared for different roles in medieval society.

The Effects of Video Games on Children

This book provides an up-to-date review and critique of research evidence from around the world in an attempt to put the issue of video game effects into perspective.

The Effects of Video Games on Children

Author: Barrie Gunter

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781850758334

Page: 172

View: 102

The rapid growth in popularity of computer and video games, particularly among children and teenagers, has given rise to public concern about the effects they might have on youngsters. The violent themes of many of these games, coupled with their interactive nature, have led to accusations that they may be worse than televised violence in affecting children's antisocial behaviour. Other allegations are that they have an addictive quality and that excessive playing results in a diminished social contact and poorer school performance. But how bad are video games? There are strong methodological reasons for not accepting the evidence for video games effects at face value. There are also positive signs that playing these games can enhance particular mental competencies in children. This book provides an up-to-date review and critique of research evidence from around the world in an attempt to put the issue of video game effects into perspective.

Games for Children

INTRODUCTION Here is a booklet of games for children of all ages from early
childhood to adolescence . There are games for the nursery school ; for use on
the playground , school ground , or in the backyard ; games which may be played
 ...

Games for Children

Author: National Recreation Association

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 62

View: 239

Children s Games in Street and Playground

Few attempts have been made to record the games children in fact play.

Children s Games in Street and Playground

Author: Iona Archibald Opie

Publisher:

ISBN: 9780863156670

Page: 224

View: 201

Perhaps this book should come with a warning to parents: within these pages, children deliberately scare each other, ritually hurt each other, take foolish risks, promote fights, and play ten against one. And yet throughout, they consistently observe their own sense of fair play.'During the past fifty years, shelf-loads of books have been written instructing children in the games they ought to play -- and some even instructing adults on how to instruct children in the games they ought to play -- but few attempts have been made to record the games children in fact play.'This was Iona and Peter Opie's pertinent observation in 1969, and it was this gap that they sought to fill with their exhaustive survey, through the 1960s, of the games that children 'in fact play' aged roughly between six and twelve years of age, and when outdoors -- and usually out of sight.The Opies weren't interested in formal games and sports supervised by parents or teachers. What excited them were the rough-and-tumble games for which, as one child described, 'nothing is needed but the players themselves.' They were also anxious that, in their meticulous recording of the games, the spirit of the play, the zest, variety and disorderliness, should not be lost.The result was their classic work Children's Games in Street and Playground. To aid a clear and lively presentation of their remarkable study, the original single book has been divided into two. Both volumes record games played in the street, park, playground and wasteland of more than 10,000 children from the Shetland Isles to the Channel Islands, although the majority of the information comes from children living in big cities such as London, Liverpool, Bristol and Glasgow.This second volume focuses on games involving seeking, hunting, racing, duelling, exerting, daring, guessing, acting and pretending. More than 85 games are described in detail including the rhymes and saying children repeat while playing them, together with the different names under which they are played. Brief historical notes are also included where relevant.The children of the 1960s, the Opies noted, are often thought 'to be incapable of self-organization, and to have become addicted to spectator amusements.' to the extent that adults must be relied on to provide play materials, ideas and time to play with them. The same attitudes are still widespread today with our concerns about television and computer games, and the middle-class parental impulse to fill our children's days with organised classes and play dates. 'However much children may need looking after, they are also people going about their own business within their own society.' There are important lessons to be learned from this book about giving children the time and physical space to be themselves with other children.