Columbia University and Morningside Heights

Outgrowing its remarkably shortlived location in midtown Manhattan, Columbia College moved uptown in the mid1890s, not only transforming itself into an urban university under university president Seth Low, but also creating an urban campus ...

Columbia University and Morningside Heights

Author: Michael V. Susi

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738549767

Page: 127

View: 767

Outgrowing its remarkably shortlived location in midtown Manhattan, Columbia College moved uptown in the mid1890s, not only transforming itself into an urban university under university president Seth Low, but also creating an urban campus guided by Charles McKim, William Rutherford Mead, and Stanford White's master plan. The university became a major constituent of what would be described as New York's Acropolis on Morningside Heights. It was preceded in this endeavor by the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine and St. Luke's Hospital, and it was soon joined by Barnard College, Teachers College, and Union Theological Seminary, among others. The arrival of the Interborough Rapid Transit Subway in 1904 spurred residential and retail development.

A Storm Foretold

A Storm Foretold: Columbia University and Morningside Heightts, 1968 offers an eyewitness account of the famous confrontation between Columbia and its surrounding community, one of the pivotal civil rights battles that characterized the ...

A Storm Foretold

Author: Christiane Collins

Publisher: eBook Bakery

ISBN: 9781938517488

Page: 268

View: 315

A Storm Foretold: Columbia University and Morningside Heights, 1968 offers an eyewitness account of the famous confrontation between Columbia and its surrounding community, one of the pivotal civil rights battles that characterized the sixties. Focused from the point of view of urban planning, author and urban historian Christiane Crasemann Collins provides firsthand insight into a preeminent institution's racially motivated tactics. With extensive research, architectural maps, and photos of the protests, A Storm Foretold shows how the university pursued the goal of creating an exclusive white acropolis on the Hudson, justified as a "need for expansion." Beginning with a plan to acquire properties on Morningside Heights, and then to empty them of "undesirable" tenants, a planned cordon sanitaire was intended to blockade the campus against the presumed alien territory of the surrounding neighborhoods, including areas in West Harlem and Morningside Park. In 1968, ignoring growing community opposition, Columbia began construction of a gymnasium next to an athletic field the university had shared with the community since the 1950s at the southern end of the scenic park. Collins' story might be titled, "Morningside Park: A Civil Rights Battle Ground" as grassroots opposition by the multi-racial community grew vigorous. Long angered by an intentionally decimating housing policy, and using "Gym Crow" as the symbol of Columbia's racist policy, community residents, students, and African-American organizations united to call for an end to the gymnasium's "invasion" of public open space. A Storm Foretold brings alive the institutional insensitivity and arrogance that ignited the civil rights movement in Morningside Heights, and the issues Collins presents are as relevant today as they were in the sixties.

Morningside Heights

In this carefully crafted volume, Michael Kort describes the wartime circumstances and thinking that form the context for the decision to use these weapons, surveys the major debates related to that decision, and provides a comprehensive ...

Morningside Heights

Author: Andrew S. Dolkart

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231078511

Page: 544

View: 868

Few aspects of American military history have been as vigorously debated as Harry Truman's decision to use atomic bombs against Japan. In this carefully crafted volume, Michael Kort describes the wartime circumstances and thinking that form the context for the decision to use these weapons, surveys the major debates related to that decision, and provides a comprehensive collection of key primary source documents that illuminate the behavior of the United States and Japan during the closing days of World War II. Kort opens with a summary of the debate over Hiroshima as it has evolved since 1945. He then provides a historical overview of thye events in question, beginning with the decision and program to build the atomic bomb. Detailing the sequence of events leading to Japan's surrender, he revisits the decisive battles of the Pacific War and the motivations of American and Japanese leaders. Finally, Kort examines ten key issues in the discussion of Hiroshima and guides readers to relevant primary source documents, scholarly books, and articles.

Harlem vs Columbia University

In this dynamic book, Stefan M. Bradley describes the impact of Black Power ideology on the Students' Afro-American Society (SAS) at Columbia.

Harlem vs  Columbia University

Author: Stefan M. Bradley

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252090586

Page: 272

View: 495

In 1968-69, Columbia University became the site for a collision of American social movements. Black Power, student power, antiwar, New Left, and Civil Rights movements all clashed with local and state politics when an alliance of black students and residents of Harlem and Morningside Heights openly protested the school's ill-conceived plan to build a large, private gymnasium in the small green park that separates the elite university from Harlem. Railing against the university's expansion policy, protesters occupied administration buildings and met violent opposition from both fellow students and the police. In this dynamic book, Stefan M. Bradley describes the impact of Black Power ideology on the Students' Afro-American Society (SAS) at Columbia. While white students--led by Mark Rudd and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)--sought to radicalize the student body and restructure the university, black students focused on stopping the construction of the gym in Morningside Park. Through separate, militant action, black students and the black community stood up to the power of an Ivy League institution and stopped it from trampling over its relatively poor and powerless neighbors. Bradley also compares the events at Columbia with similar events at Harvard, Cornell, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania.

A Guide to Columbia University

Presents a historical account of Columbia University. Written as a guide for prospective students, along with the general public.

A Guide to Columbia University

Author: John William Robson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 213

View: 763

Presents a historical account of Columbia University. Written as a guide for prospective students, along with the general public. Covers the University's beginnings, each campus quadrangle, the individual colleges, along with traditions and student life.

Mastering McKim s Plan

Drawing on an abundance of materials from Columbia's Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, this book charts the architectural trajectory of this famed institution and celebrates the centennial of architect Charles Follen McKim's ...

Mastering McKim s Plan

Author: Barry Bergdoll

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9781884919046

Page: 249

View: 883

This volume charts the architectural trajectory of Columbia University in New York City and celebrates the centennial of architect Charles Follen McKim's enduring vision of a spatially unified, architecturally integrated urban university.

Stand Columbia

Consistent with this putative antiurban bias is the otherwise strange fact that
Columbia's scientists have been—and ... Morningside Heights: A History of Its
Architecture and Development (New York: Columbia University Press, 1998), 354
. 39.

Stand  Columbia

Author: Robert McCaughey

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231503555

Page: 760

View: 906

Stand, Columbia! Alma Mater Through the storms of Time abide Stand, Columbia! Alma Mater Through the storms of Time abide. "Stand, Columbia!" by Gilbert Oakley Ward, Columbia College 1902 (1904) Marking the 250th anniversary of one of America's oldest and most formidable educational institutions, this comprehensive history of Columbia University extends from the earliest discussions in 1704 about New York City being "a fit Place for a colledge" to the recent inauguration of president Lee Bollinger, the nineteenth, on Morningside Heights. One of the original "Colonial Nine" schools, Columbia's distinctive history has been intertwined with the history of New York City. Located first in lower Manhattan, then in midtown, and now in Morningside Heights, Columbia's national and international stature have been inextricably identified with its urban setting. Columbia was the first of America's "multiversities," moving beyond its original character as a college dedicated to undergraduate instruction to offer a comprehensive program in professional and graduate studies. Medicine, law, architecture, and journalism have all looked to the graduates and faculty of Columbia's schools to provide for their ongoing leadership and vitality. In 2003, a sampling of Columbia alumni include one member of the United States Supreme Court, three United States senators, three congressmen, three governors (New York, New Jersey, and California), a chief justice of the New York Court of Appeals, and a president of the New York City Board of Education. But it is perhaps as a contributor of ideas and voices to the broad discourse of American intellectual life that Columbia has most distinguished itself. From The Federalist Papers, written by Columbians John Jay and Alexander Hamilton, to Charles Beard's An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution and Jack Kerouac's On the Road to Edward Said's Orientalism, Columbia and its graduates have greatly influenced American intellectual and public life. Stand, Columbia also examines the experiences of immigrants, women, Jews, African Americans, and other groups as it takes critical measure of the University's efforts to become more inclusive and more reflective of the diverse city that it calls home.

Hamlet of Morningside Heights

This book reveals the remarkable life of a Renaissance New Yorker sustained by the play Hamlet. Craven's detective work finds for the first time Apostle Paul's ethical principles integrated throughout the play.

Hamlet of Morningside Heights

Author: Kenneth Craven

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Pub

ISBN: 9781443833431

Page: 98

View: 857

This book reveals the remarkable life of a Renaissance New Yorker sustained by the play Hamlet. Craven's detective work finds for the first time Apostle Paul's ethical principles integrated throughout the play. The insights that emerge from this discovery reverberate throughout American culture today, explaining dramatic shifts in values that have cascaded down the generations. These dynamics reflect Craven's lineage: a fascinating mix of genial humanists, fiery ideologues, and effective, business-minded Yorkers traced back to Shakespeare's London. Craven melds groundbreaking literary insight with reflection on his own life, a continuing search for and demonstration of executive power.

Upending the Ivory Tower

17 George B. Ford to Robert Moses, November 9, 1951, “Housing for
Morningside,” Morningside Heights Incorporated project files, folder 25, box 97,
Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Library; New York Times,
October 2, 1951, ...

Upending the Ivory Tower

Author: Stefan M. Bradley

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479806021

Page: 480

View: 717

Winner, 2019 Anna Julia Cooper and C.L.R. James Award, given by the National Council for Black Studies Finalist, 2019 Pauli Murray Book Prize in Black Intellectual History, given by the African American Intellectual History Society Winner, 2019 Outstanding Book Award, given by the History of Education Society The inspiring story of the black students, faculty, and administrators who forever changed America’s leading educational institutions and paved the way for social justice and racial progress The eight elite institutions that comprise the Ivy League, sometimes known as the Ancient Eight—Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Brown, Dartmouth, and Cornell—are American stalwarts that have profoundly influenced history and culture by producing the nation’s and the world’s leaders. The few black students who attended Ivy League schools in the decades following WWII not only went on to greatly influence black America and the nation in general, but unquestionably awakened these most traditional and selective of American spaces. In the twentieth century, black youth were in the vanguard of the black freedom movement and educational reform. Upending the Ivory Tower illuminates how the Black Power movement, which was borne out of an effort to edify the most disfranchised of the black masses, also took root in the hallowed halls of America’s most esteemed institutions of higher education. Between the close of WWII and 1975, the civil rights and Black Power movements transformed the demographics and operation of the Ivy League on and off campus. As desegregators and racial pioneers, black students, staff, and faculty used their status in the black intelligentsia to enhance their predominantly white institutions while advancing black freedom. Although they were often marginalized because of their race and class, the newcomers altered educational policies and inserted blackness into the curricula and culture of the unabashedly exclusive and starkly white schools. This book attempts to complete the narrative of higher education history, while adding a much needed nuance to the history of the Black Power movement. It tells the stories of those students, professors, staff, and administrators who pushed for change at the risk of losing what privilege they had. Putting their status, and sometimes even their lives, in jeopardy, black activists negotiated, protested, and demonstrated to create opportunities for the generations that followed. The enrichments these change agents made endure in the diversity initiatives and activism surrounding issues of race that exist in the modern Ivy League. Upending the Ivory Tower not only informs the civil rights and Black Power movements of the postwar era but also provides critical context for the Black Lives Matter movement that is growing in the streets and on campuses throughout the country today. As higher education continues to be a catalyst for change, there is no one better to inform today’s activists than those who transformed our country’s past and paved the way for its future.

Columbia University Quarterly

Another important function which is part of the regular routine is snow cleaning ,
which involves clearing about four miles of walks on Morningside Heights alone .
There is a highpowered tractor with a revolving brush which starts to work as ...

Columbia University Quarterly

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Vol. 6 includes 150th anniversary number.

Columbia University Forum

CONVERSATIONS AND CONCERNS A SECOND CAMPUS ? perde .
szerrerarearea Su ezerom on aina Songs Columbia as College or University has
not always been on Morningside Heights . Before it was either it was on Park
Place , and ...

Columbia University Forum

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