Chaucer to Spenser

Chaucer to Spenser

Author: Derek Pearsall

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

ISBN: 9780631198390

Page: 686

View: 128

In this key anthology Derek Pearsall offers a radically new approach to those teaching and studying English writing from Geoffrey Chaucer to the early work of Edmund Spenser. Ignoring the traditional barrier between medieval, or Middle English, and Tudor, Elizabethan or "early modern" writing, he sets out to emphasize continuities and so counter the distorting view that "English literature" begins with Thomas Wyatt and the Earl of Surrey. Extensive coverage is given to key figures such as Chaucer and Langland, but this is not an anthology of English literature, but of writing. All forms of discursive writing - literary, political, legal, personal, polemic, spiritual, practical - are represented in an attempt to demonstrate the close mesh between writing, of all kinds, and the political, social and cultural practice of the time. The assumption of the collection is that written texts, though they may be analyzed from many points of view, including some that are legitimately ahistorical, are never better understood than when studied in their historical context. All texts are newly edited from the best sources and presented in their original spelling (apart from the substitution of obsolete letter-forms). On-the-page glossaries throughout give help with harder words. Headnotes and explanatory notes are provided for each text.

Poetry from Chaucer to Spenser

A succinct introduction to each volume gives readersa sense of how literature developed during the period inquestion. These concise volumes are designed for general readers wishingto extend their cultural horizons and literary knowledge.

Poetry from Chaucer to Spenser

Author: Duncan Wu

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780631229865

Page: 181

View: 604

Raymond Williams’ Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society is justly renowned for its role in providing a whole generation of students and intellectuals with trusty and cogent distillations of the language of cultural studies. First published in 1976, the text played a pivotal role in both academic and public understandings of culture and society and the relations between them. New Keywords: A Revised Vocabulary of Culture and Society updates Williams’ classic text by reflecting the transformation in culture and society over the last quarter century.New Keywords includes many of Williams’ original entries, but with new discussions of their history and use over the last 25 years. Several other entries encapsulate the practices, institutions, and debates of contemporary society. The editors have assembled an international team of scholars to write from a variety of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields---cultural and media studies, feminism, post-colonial and subaltern studies, the history of science, sociology, gay and lesbian studies. The result is a state-of-the art reference for students, teachers and public intellectuals everywhere.Raymond Williams’ Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society is justly renowned for its role in providing a whole generation of students and intellectuals with trusty and cogent distillations of the language of cultural studies. First published in 1976, the text played a pivotal role in both academic and public understandings of culture and society and the relations between them. New Keywords: A Revised Vocabulary of Culture and Society updates Williams’ classic text by reflecting the transformation in culture and society over the last quarter century.New Keywords includes many of Williams’ original entries, but with new discussions of their history and use over the last 25 years. Several other entries encapsulate the practices, institutions, and debates of contemporary society. The editors have assembled an international team of scholars to write from a variety of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields---cultural and media studies, feminism, post-colonial and subaltern studies, the history of science, sociology, gay and lesbian studies. The result is a state-of-the art reference for students, teachers and public intellectuals everywhere.Raymond Williams’ Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society is justly renowned for its role in providing a whole generation of students and intellectuals with trusty and cogent distillations of the language of cultural studies. First published in 1976, the text played a pivotal role in both academic and public understandings of culture and society and the relations between them. New Keywords: A Revised Vocabulary of Culture and Society updates Williams’ classic text by reflecting the transformation in culture and society over the last quarter century.New Keywords includes many of Williams’ original entries, but with new discussions of their history and use over the last 25 years. Several other entries encapsulate the practices, institutions, and debates of contemporary society. The editors have assembled an international team of scholars to write from a variety of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields---cultural and media studies, feminism, post-colonial and subaltern studies, the history of science, sociology, gay and lesbian studies. The result is a state-of-the art reference for students, teachers and public intellectuals everywhere.

Reading the Allegorical Intertext

Anderson’s book, the result of decades of teaching and writing about allegory, especially Spenserian allegory, will reorient thinking about fundamental critical issues and the landmark texts in which they play themselves out.

Reading the Allegorical Intertext

Author: Judith H. Anderson

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 0823228495

Page: 452

View: 886

Judith H. Anderson conceives the intertext as a relation between or among texts that encompasses both Kristevan intertextuality and traditional relationships of influence, imitation, allusion, and citation. Like the Internet, the intertext is a state, or place, of potential expressed in ways ranging from deliberate emulation to linguistic free play. Relatedly, the intertext is also a convenient fiction that enables examination of individual agency and sociocultural determinism. Anderson’s intertext is allegorical because Spenser’s Faerie Queene is pivotal to her study and because allegory, understood as continued or moving metaphor, encapsulates, even as it magnifies, the process of signification. Her title signals the variousness of an intertext extending from Chaucer through Shakespeare to Milton and the breadth of allegory itself. Literary allegory, in Anderson’s view, is at once a mimetic form and a psychic one—a process thinking that combines mind with matter, emblem with narrative, abstraction with history. Anderson’s first section focuses on relations between Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, including the role of the narrator, the nature of the textual source, the dynamics of influence, and the bearing of allegorical narrative on lyric vision. The second centers on agency and cultural influence in a variety of Spenserian and medieval texts. Allegorical form, a recurrent concern throughout, becomes the pressing issue of section three. This section treats plays and poems of Shakespeare and Milton and includes two intertextually relevant essays on Spenser. How Paradise Lost or Shakespeare’s plays participate in allegorical form is controversial. Spenser’s experiments with allegory revise its form, and this intervention is largely what Shakespeare and Milton find in his poetry and develop. Anderson’s book, the result of decades of teaching and writing about allegory, especially Spenserian allegory, will reorient thinking about fundamental critical issues and the landmark texts in which they play themselves out.

The Shaping of English Poetry

This collection of essays is conceived not as a summary of past endeavours but as the beginning of an attempt to present a sense of the wholeness of a distinctively English literature from Beowulf to Spenser.

The Shaping of English Poetry

Author: Gerald Morgan

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9783039119561

Page: 299

View: 104

This collection of essays is conceived not as a summary of past endeavours but as the beginning of an attempt to present a sense of the wholeness of a distinctively English literature from Beowulf to Spenser. The native alliterative tradition of England is represented by its final flowering in two essays on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and three on Piers Plowman. The renewal of English letters in the fourteenth century, inspired by continental models in French and Italian, is represented by four essays on Chaucer. The poetic achievement of these three medieval masters remains unmatched until Spenser announces himself in a third great age in the history of English poetry and this is represented by three essays on the first three books of The Faerie Queene. Spenser's indebtedness to Langland and Chaucer, and his philosophical conservatism in drawing on the thought of Aristotle and the tradition of medieval commentary surrounding the works of Aristotle, ensure that the tradition of English poetry in the Renaissance is securely rooted in its medieval inheritance.

Chaucer Spenser Sidney

Gertrude H. Ely. English Men of Letters for Boys and Girls CHAUCER SPENSER
SIDNEY BY GERTRUDE H . ELY NEW YORK AND CHICAGO E . L . KELLOGG &
Co . HARVARD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Copyright , 1894 , BY GERTRUDE H.

Chaucer  Spenser  Sidney

Author: Gertrude H. Ely

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 117

View: 492

The British Quarterly Review

When we inquire what it is that makes Dryden's name so important as to entitle it
to rank , as it seems to do , the fifth in the series of great English poets after
Chaucer , Spenser , Shakespeare , and Milton , we find that it is nothing else than
the ...

The British Quarterly Review

Author: Henry Allon

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page:

View: 568

Complete Works of Edmund Spenser

He died prematurely in the year of salvation 1598 , and is buried near Geoffrey
Chaucer , who was the first most happily to set forth poetry in English writing : and
on him were written these epitaphs :Here nigh to Chaucer Spenser lies ; to whom
 ...

Complete Works of Edmund Spenser

Author: Edmund Spenser

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 736

View: 103

Refiguring Chaucer in the Renaissance

This collection of essays surveys the diverse receptions and workings of Chaucer from the early sixteenth to the early seventeenth century.

Refiguring Chaucer in the Renaissance

Author: Theresa M. Krier

Publisher: University Press of Florida

ISBN: 9780813015521

Page: 240

View: 481

This collection of essays surveys the diverse receptions and workings of Chaucer from the early sixteenth to the early seventeenth century. It emphasizes the many kinds of influence that Chaucer and his poems exerted on British letters and culture during these years and assesses how "Chaucer" - poet, works, and representations by others - became a cultural category that changed in Tudor and early Jacobean England, as the Reformation and increasing distance from Middle English made Chaucer representative of a lost medieval past.

Strategies of Poetic Narrative

Kinney's close readings of three sophisticated poetic narratives, Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, Book VI of Spenser's The Faerie Queene, and Milton's Paradise Lost, suggest that these diverse works are united by a common tendency to ...

Strategies of Poetic Narrative

Author: Clare Regan Kinney

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521107808

Page: 276

View: 967

It is remarkable that some theoretical developments in narratology have bypassed poetic narratives, concentrating almost exclusively on prose fiction. Clare Kinney's original study aims to redress the balance by exploring the distinctive narrative strategies of fictions which unfold in the artificial and self-conscious schemes of language bound by poetic form. Kinney's close readings of three sophisticated poetic narratives, Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, Book VI of Spenser's The Faerie Queene, and Milton's Paradise Lost, suggest that these diverse works are united by a common tendency to exploit the alternative patterns of lyric in order to defer undesirable conclusions and offer subversive counterplots. Finally, an exploration of Eliot's The Waste Land as poetic 'anti-narrative' leads into a consideration of the ways in which poetic fictions employ their various, inherently double designs - in particular their ability to invoke the resources of lyric - to pre-empt unhappy endings by telling at least two stories at the same time.