Anti Judaism in Early Christianity Separation and polemic

The second volume in this two-volume work studying the initial developments of anti-Judaism within the church examines the evolution of the Christian faith in its social context as revealed by evidence such as early patristic and rabbinic ...

Anti Judaism in Early Christianity  Separation and polemic

Author: Peter Richardson

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 088920196X

Page: 197

View: 157

The second volume in this two-volume work studying the initial developments of anti-Judaism within the church examines the evolution of the Christian faith in its social context as revealed by evidence such as early patristic and rabbinic writings and archaeological findings.

Anti Judaism in Early Christianity

Introduction Since the Holocaust the question of Christianity's contribution to
antiSemitism has given rise to a vast amount of ... The early Christian materials
have often been examined to assess their role in the longstanding negative
attitude of ...

Anti Judaism in Early Christianity

Author: Peter Richardson

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 0889206317

Page: 244

View: 900

The period since the close of World War II has been agonizingly introspective—not least because of the pain of reassessing Christianity’s attitude to Judaism. The early Christian materials have often been examined to assess their role in the long-standing negative attitude of Christians to Jews. The motivation for the early church’s sometimes harsh attitude was partly theological—it needed to define itself over against its parent—and partly sociological—it needed to make clear the line that divided the fledgling group of Christian believers fromt he group with which it was most likely to be confused. This collection of studies emphasizes the context and history of early Christianity in reconsidering many of the classic passages that have contributed to the development of anti-Judaism in Christianity. The volume opens with an essay that clearly delineates the state of the question of anti-Judaism in early Christianity. Then follow discussions of specific passages in the writings of Paul as well as the Gospels.

Anti Judaism and Early Christian Identity

Against the scholarly consensus that assumes early Christians were involved in a rivalry for converts with contemporary Jews, this book shows that the target of patristic writers was rather a symbolic Judaism, and their aim was to define ...

Anti Judaism and Early Christian Identity

Author: Miriam S. Taylor

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004101869

Page: 207

View: 231

Against the scholarly consensus that assumes early Christians were involved in a rivalry for converts with contemporary Jews, this book shows that the target of patristic writers was rather a symbolic Judaism, and their aim was to define theologically the young church's identity. In identifying and categorizing the hypotheses put forward by modern scholars to defend their view of a Jewish-Christian 'conflict', this book demonstrates how current theories have generated faulty notions about the perceptions and motivations of ancient Christians and Jews. Beyond its relevance to students of the early church, this book addresses the broader question of Christian responsibility for modern anti-Semitism. It shows how the focus on a supposedly social rivalry, obscures the depth and disquieting nature of the connections between early anti-Judaism and Christian identity.

Anti Judaism in Early Christianity Separation and polemic

The second volume in this two-volume work studying the initial developments of anti-Judaism within the church examines the evolution of the Christian faith in its social context as revealed by evidence such as early patristic and rabbinic ...

Anti Judaism in Early Christianity  Separation and polemic

Author: Peter Richardson

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 088920196X

Page: 197

View: 806

The second volume in this two-volume work studying the initial developments of anti-Judaism within the church examines the evolution of the Christian faith in its social context as revealed by evidence such as early patristic and rabbinic writings and archaeological findings.

Jewish Responses to Early Christian

This book provides historical context and nuanced exegesis of texts that continue to be "trouble spots" in Jewish-Christian relations. It illuminates the diverse strands of early anti-Judaism while providing the reader with some surprises.

Jewish Responses to Early Christian

Author: Claudia Setzer

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 9781451405217

Page:

View: 938

What were Jews saying and doing about the followers of Jesus in the first two centuries? In this provocative and comprehensive study, Claudia Setzer argues persuasively that Jews saw the early followers of Jesus as Jews for some time after the Christians viewed themselves as separate from the larger Jewish communities. This book provides historical context and nuanced exegesis of texts that continue to be "trouble spots" in Jewish-Christian relations. It illuminates the diverse strands of early anti-Judaism while providing the reader with some surprises.

Jews Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity

The book, which consists of some previously published and unpublished essays, examines a variety of issues relevant to the study of ancient Judaism and Christianity and their interaction, including polemic, proselytism, biblical ...

Jews  Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity

Author: James Carleton Paget

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161503122

Page: 538

View: 301

The book, which consists of some previously published and unpublished essays, examines a variety of issues relevant to the study of ancient Judaism and Christianity and their interaction, including polemic, proselytism, biblical interpretation, messianism, the phenomenon normally described as Jewish Christianity, and the fate of the Jewish community after the Bar Kokhba revolt, a period of considerable importance for the emergence not only of Judaism but also of Christianity. The volume, typically for a collection of essays, does not lay out a particular thesis. If anything binds the collection together, it is the author's attempt to set out the major fault lines in current debate about these disputed subjects, and in the process to reveal their complex and entangled character.

Christian Antisemitism

Christian Antisemitism

Author: William Nicholls

Publisher: Jason Aronson

ISBN: 9780876683989

Page: 499

View: 305

Nevertheless, it is correct." Christian Antisemitism traces, over two millennia, the growing domination of Western culture by the Christian "myth" (as Nicholls calls it) about the Jews, and shows how it still exerts a major influence even on the secularized "post-Christian world." Nicholls shows, through scrupulous research and documentation, that the myth of the Jews as Christ-killers has powered anti-Judaism and antisemitism throughout the centuries. Nicholls clearly illustrates that this myth is present in the New Testament and that "it has not yet died under the impact of modern critical history." Also included in this remarkable volume is Nicholls' research regarding the Jewishness of Jesus. He writes, "Historical scholarship now permits us to affirm with confidence that Jesus of Nazareth was a faithful and observant Jew who lived by the Torah and taught nothing against his own people and their faith ...

The Origins of Anti Semitism

This revisionist reading of early anti-Judaism offers a richer and more varied picture of the Jews and Christians of antiquity.

The Origins of Anti Semitism

Author: John G. Gager

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195365160

Page: 349

View: 917

This revisionist reading of early anti-Judaism offers a richer and more varied picture of the Jews and Christians of antiquity.

The Anguish of the Jews

Written by a Catholic priest, this classic book on antisemitism traces the events of twenty-three centuries, including Christian involvement in this tragic story.

The Anguish of the Jews

Author: Edward H. Flannery

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN: 9780809143245

Page: 369

View: 326

Written by a Catholic priest, this classic book on antisemitism traces the events of twenty-three centuries, including Christian involvement in this tragic story.

Religious and Anti religious Roots of Modern Anti Semitism

Traces the beginnings of modern antisemitism to romantic anti-rationalism in Germany.

Religious and Anti religious Roots of Modern Anti Semitism

Author: Uriel Tal

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 28

View: 726

Traces the beginnings of modern antisemitism to romantic anti-rationalism in Germany. Notes how early antisemitism was not only anti-Jewish but also anti-Christian in its rejection of monotheism and morality, as viewed by Wilhelm Marr and others. Only a Christianity that rejected its Jewish roots and favored Aryan Germans was acceptable to antisemites. In the 1870s-80s German intellectuals saw antisemitism as a general attack against religion, especially Roman Catholicism. The contradiction between the racist view of Judaism and the Christian view that conversion could save the Jews was partly resolved by the Darwinian racial ideology espoused by Eugen Dühring, among others. The Third Reich introduced a new antisemitism, that of a pseudo-religion, a redemptive political messianism with an anti-theological structure, a pseudo-gospel with Hitler replacing Jesus and a new apocalypse. To determine the relation between antisemitism and the Church, one has to study the latter not in terms of a static essence but in terms of its history. Christianity inherited pagan elements that continued to exist as anti-Jewish attitudes within the Church, culminating in the destructive force of Nazism, directed not only against Judaism, but through Judaism against humanity, including Christianity. One strong anti-Jewish element in Christianty was the concept of collective guilt, which was secularized and used by the Nazis against the Jews and against Christians.

Jews and Christians

This volume contains papers from the second Durham-Tubingen Research Symposium on Earliest Christianity and Judaism that help clarify the extent to which we can speak of the parting of the ways between Christianity and Judaism.

Jews and Christians

Author: James D. G. Dunn

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9780802844989

Page: 404

View: 565

This volume contains papers from the second Durham-Tubingen Research Symposium on Earliest Christianity and Judaism that help clarify the extent to which we can speak of the parting of the ways between Christianity and Judaism. Twelve internationally respected scholars carefully analyze the chief Jewish and Christian documents and traditions from the period A.D. 70-135, drawing out what they say about the mutual relations between early Christianity and Judaism and the light they shed on the diverging trajectories of these two major religious traditions.

The True Israel

This study of the use of the names 'Jew', 'Hebrew' and 'Israel' in ancient Jewish and early Christian literature - especially the Bible, Philo, Josephus, Dead Sea Scrolls, New Testament and Mishnah - defines the nature of Israel and Judaism ...

The True Israel

Author: Graham Harvey

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9780391041196

Page: 303

View: 834

This study of the use of the names 'Jew', 'Hebrew' and 'Israel' in ancient Jewish and early Christian literature - especially the Bible, Philo, Josephus, Dead Sea Scrolls, New Testament and Mishnah - defines the nature of Israel and Judaism in Antiquity. This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.

Playing a Jewish Game

Evidence of Gentile Christian judaizers can be found in canonical sources, such as Pauls Letter to the Galatians and the Book of Revelation, as well as non-canonical sources, such as the Epistle of Barnabas, the Didache, and Justin ...

Playing a Jewish Game

Author: Michele Murray

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 0889204012

Page: 221

View: 779

Is it possible that early Christian anti-Judaism was directed toward people other than Jews? Michele Murray proposes that significant strands of early Christian anti-Judaism were directed against Gentile Christians. More specifically, it was directed toward Gentile Christian judaizers. These were Christians who combined a commitment to Christianity with adherence in varying degrees to Jewish practices, without viewing such behaviour as contradictory. Several Christian leaders thought that these community members dangerously blurred the boundaries between Christianity and Judaism. As such, Gentile Christian judaizers became the target of much anti-Jewish rhetoric in various early Christian writings. Evidence of Gentile Christian judaizers can be found in canonical sources, such as Pauls Letter to the Galatians and the Book of Revelation, as well as non-canonical sources, such as the Epistle of Barnabas, the Didache, and Justin Martyr’s Dialogue with Trypho. In order to compare the phenomenon of judaizing and the reaction to it of ecclesiastical authorities, Murray organizes the evidence by probable geographical location, using Asia Minor and Syria as the two main loci. The phenomenon of Gentile Christian judaizing is examined within the broader context of Jewish-Christian relations in the early centuries, and is the first attempt to draw all possible references to Gentile Christian judaizers together into one study to consider them as a whole. This discussion invites readers to reflect on the existence of Gentile Christian judaizers as another point on the continuum of Jewish-Christian relations in the Greco-Roman world — an area, Murray concludes, that needs to be more carefully defined.

Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism

" Alexander Solzhenitsyn In this penetrating and provocative work, Jonas E. Alexis challenges common assumptions about the relationship between Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism and provides compelling evidence from history and theology ...

Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism

Author: Jonas E. Alexis

Publisher: WestBow Press

ISBN: 1449734863

Page: 548

View: 945

"The simple step of a courageous individual is not to take part in the lie. One word of truth outweighs the world." Alexander Solzhenitsyn In this penetrating and provocative work, Jonas E. Alexis challenges common assumptions about the relationship between Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism and provides compelling evidence from history and theology that demonstrates the extent to which modern Judaism has been defined by the Pharisaic and Rabbinic schools of thought. As Alexis meticulously documents, there has been a constant struggle between Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism since the time of Christ, a struggle that will define the destiny of the West. Islam, according to Christianity, is a historically and theologically false religion, since it denies both Jesus's deity and His work of salvation at the Cross. But Rabbinic Judaism, Alexis argues, is equally false and in many respects more dangerous to Christianity and the West than Islam, since at its root Rabbinic Judaism wages war against the Logos, the system of order in the world embodied by Christ. In this painstakingly scholarly yet readable work, Alexis maintains that Rabbinic Judaism, defined by the Pharisaic teachings (now codified in the Talmud) that Jesus sought to correct, is a categorical and metaphysical rejection of Christianity, a rejection that has had and will continue to have severe implications for Western culture, intellectual history, and theological exegesis.

Forgotten Origins

If that was the case, the ferocity of the Christian reply was ultimately unequaled and repaid Jewish rejection many times over.To discover the forgotten Jewish origins of early Christianity, a series of chapters will lay out the case for ...

Forgotten Origins

Author: Juan Marcos Gutierrez

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781543025002

Page: 560

View: 679

Many years ago, in a lecture on the creation of the Mishnah, the Orthodox Jewish historian, Rabbi Berel Wein discussed the rise of early Christianity as a historical and theological backdrop. He mentioned that this era is of particular importance to Jews because of the complicated and tragic relationship between Jews and Christians over the centuries. He referred to Joseph Klausner, the famed Jewish professor of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem who in the earlier part of the 20th century, had authored several works on early Christianity from a Jewish standpoint. The first was titled Jesus of Nazareth. The second was titled From Jesus to Paul. Rabbi Wein considered both books to be exemplary works on the subject. He noted, disappointingly, however, that at the time, most Christians were not interested in reading the Jewish perspectives of Joseph Klausner. Jews, he observed, were not that fascinated by the subject either. Things have changed considerably, however, and the historical relationship between Judaism and Christianity is of increasing importance for both contemporary communities. Even in discussing Jewish Law, as Rabbi Wein noted, the subject of Christianity is not far away in significance. Similarly, for Christians, there is probably not a weekly service that goes by without Israel or the Jewish people being mentioned in some form or fashion.The process of reflection has not been an easy one. Since the third and fourth centuries, the worlds of Judaism and Christianity have increasingly crystallized to such a level of distinction obscuring their shared history and theology. Consequently, people legitimately ask what connections between Judaism and Christianity exist. That was not always the case, and early Christians, as well as Jews, were cognizant of the ties that existed. In past centuries the connections were usually the source of bitter polemics between the two communities. Each community saw itself as the legitimate representative of biblical faith to the exclusion of the other. The relationships deteriorated steadily over time.Rabbi Byron Sherwin of blessed memory, in a lecture at the Spertus Institute of Jewish Learning and Leadership and in his book Studies in Jewish Theology, noted what he believed to be the great enigma of Christianity. He believed like the medieval and early modern rabbis, Rabbi Menahem Ha-Meiri, Rabbi Abraham Farisol, Rabbi Moses Rivkes, Rabbi Leon de Modena, and Rabbi Jacob Emden and others that Christianity had transformed many non-Jews from paganism to the knowledge of the God of Israel. This was not an endorsement of Christianity for Jews, but recognition of its positive effects for non-Jews.Almost simultaneously, however, the nascent Christian movement also promoted anti-Judaism and then anti-Semitism. Rabbi Berel Wein, in his lecture on the Oral Law, speculated whether significant Jewish opposition to the early followers of Jesus resulted in long-term and negative recollections that became embedded in later Christianity. If that was the case, the ferocity of the Christian reply was ultimately unequaled and repaid Jewish rejection many times over.To discover the forgotten Jewish origins of early Christianity, a series of chapters will lay out the case for the continued Jewish distinctiveness of the early Christian movement composed of Jews in the first century and beyond. Their Jewish identity lay along a wide-ranging continuum. Other sections will also examine those who departed or deviated from these views.

The Jew in Christian Theology

Martin Luther's viciously anti-Jewish pamphlet, Vom Schem Hampboras, presented here in its original German and its first-ever English translation, is but one of the many sources translated here for the first time from Latin, Hebrew and ...

The Jew in Christian Theology

Author: Gerhard Falk

Publisher: McFarland & Company Incorporated Pub

ISBN:

Page: 296

View: 860

Martin Luther's viciously anti-Jewish pamphlet, Vom Schem Hampboras, presented here in its original German and its first-ever English translation, is but one of the many sources translated here for the first time from Latin, Hebrew and German.This study reviews the earliest Christian writings concerning the Jews and shows how Christian synods and influential theologians legitimized and reinforced hatred of the Jewish people. The book also examines the modern attempts in Protestant and Catholic theology to promote friendship toward the Jewish people.

Interwoven Destinies

Traces the history and significance of the ancient relationship between the church and the Jewish people as a history of surprising interdependence as well as enmity and in its later periods even violence.

Interwoven Destinies

Author: Eugene J. Fisher

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN: 9780809133635

Page: 154

View: 649

Traces the history and significance of the ancient relationship between the church and the Jewish people as a history of surprising interdependence as well as enmity and in its later periods even violence.

Early Christian Texts on Jews and Judaism

INTRODUCTION : Methodology FOUR EARLY CHRISTIAN TEXTS ON JEWS
AND JUDAISM IN THE SECOND CENTURY C.E. · I. Introduction The purpose of
this book is to examine four early Christian anti - Jewish writings , known as ...

Early Christian Texts on Jews and Judaism

Author: Robert S. MacLennan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 203

View: 161

Examines four early Christian anti-Jewish writings, applying new methods of the historical-critical school. The four 2nd century texts are by Barnabas ("Epistle of Barnabas"), Justin Martyr ("Dialogue with Trypho"), Melito of Sardis ("Paschal Homily"), and Tertullian ("Answer to the Jews"). States that these texts, along with the New Testament, were theological and not historical works. Deplores the fact that they are still used by modern Christians to propagate prejudice or create false impressions about Jews and Judaism.