Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War

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Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War

Author: Frederick Arthur Ambrose Talbot

Publisher: Good Press

ISBN:

Page: 220

View: 887

"Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War" by Frederick Arthur Ambrose Talbot. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

A roplanes and Dirigibles of War

A  roplanes and Dirigibles of War

Author: HardPress

Publisher: Hardpress Publishing

ISBN: 9781314160598

Page: 342

View: 228

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War

Aeroplanes and Dirigibles Of War was written by Frederick A. Talbot. It describes aircraft and military operations used in World War I such as bomb-throwing, scouting from the sky and describes battles in the air.

Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War

Author: Frederick Talbot

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781466359093

Page: 238

View: 984

Aeroplanes and Dirigibles Of War was written by Frederick A. Talbot. It describes aircraft and military operations used in World War I such as bomb-throwing, scouting from the sky and describes battles in the air.

Aeroplanes And Dirigibles Of War

The dogged struggle against the blind forces of Nature was waged tenaciously and perseveringly for centuries.

Aeroplanes And Dirigibles Of War

Author: Frederick A Talbot

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 186

View: 722

The dogged struggle against the blind forces of Nature was waged tenaciously and perseveringly for centuries. But the measure of success recorded from time to time was so disappointing as to convey the impression, except in a limited circle, that the problem was impossible of solution. In the meantime wondrous changes had taken place in the methods of transportation by land and sea. The steam and electric railway, steam propulsion of vessels, and mechanical movement along the highroads had been evolved and advanced to a high standard of perfection, to the untold advantage of the community. Consequently it was argued, if only a system of travel along the aerial highways could be established, then all other methods of mechanical transportation would be rendered, if not entirely obsolete, at least antiquated.

Military Aircraft in World War One Airships and Airplanes

The introduction of aircraft into military operations - The military uses of the captive balloon - Germany's rise to military airship supremacy - Airships of war - Germany's aerial dreadnought fleet - The military value of Germany's aerial ...

Military Aircraft in World War One   Airships and Airplanes

Author: Frederick A. Talbot

Publisher: Diggory Press Limited

ISBN: 9781847780492

Page: 108

View: 843

The introduction of aircraft into military operations - The military uses of the captive balloon - Germany's rise to military airship supremacy - Airships of war - Germany's aerial dreadnought fleet - The military value of Germany's aerial fleet - Aeroplanes of war - Scouting from the skies - The airman and artillery - Bomb-throwing from air-craft - Armoured aeroplanes - Battles in the air - Tricks and ruses to baffle the airman - Anti-aircraft guns. Mobile weapons - Anti-aircraft guns. Immobile weapons - Mining the air - Wireless in aviation - Aircraft and naval operations - The navies of the air

Airships in Peace and War

A British assessment of developments in aerial warfare, published in 1910 at a time of intense European military rivalry.

Airships in Peace and War

Author: R. P. Hearne

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108061559

Page: 488

View: 967

A British assessment of developments in aerial warfare, published in 1910 at a time of intense European military rivalry.

UFOs of the First World War

Lieutenant R.S. Maxwell took off in his BE2C fighter but saw nothing unusual until 8.25 p.m. when, according to his report: ‘My engine was missing irregularly and it was only by keeping the speed of the machine down to 50 mph that I was ...

UFOs of the First World War

Author: Nigel Watson

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750959274

Page: 160

View: 972

Lieutenant R.S. Maxwell took off in his BE2C fighter but saw nothing unusual until 8.25 p.m. when, according to his report: ‘My engine was missing irregularly and it was only by keeping the speed of the machine down to 50 mph that I was able to stay at 10,000 feet. I distinctly saw an artificial light to the north of me, and at about the same height. I followed this light northeast for nearly 20 minutes, but it seemed to go slightly higher and just as quickly as myself, and eventually I lost it completely in the clouds.’ Such sightings occurred frequently during the war. The reasons are fascinating in themselves: the first is that aviation is in its infancy, so light phenomena at altitude are a new experience. The second is fear: for the first time a real threat came from the skies. It wasn’t just the Western Front: on 21 August 1915 twenty New Zealand soldiers allegedly saw eight bread-loaf shaped clouds over Hill 60, Suvla Bay. ‘A British regiment, the First- Fourth Norfolk, of several hundred men, was then noticed marching . . . towards Hill 60.’ They marched into the cloud, which lifted off the ground, and were never seen again.

The Times History of the War Vol 7 Classic Reprint

If this stage Vol. VII. - Part 79. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

The Times History of the War  Vol  7  Classic Reprint

Author:

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9781333922870

Page: 516

View: 646

Excerpt from The Times History of the War, Vol. 7 The first German attacks did not come until the end of December, 1914. An aeroplane ew over the East Coast and dropped a bomb or two on the sands there. On Christmas Eve an aeroplane appeared over Dover and dropped a bomb in a garden. The bomb was probably intended for Dover Castle, but it fell hann lessly a few hundred yards away. Some British aeroplanes immediately arose in pursuit of the invading aeroplane, but before they could over-haul it it had escaped. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works."

Modern Balloons and Airships

Undeterred by the work, and the fact that several would-be pioneers died in crashes trying to control gliders, the Wright Brothers tested out gliding at Kitty Hawk in North Carolina for several years, working to perfect pilot control before ...

Modern Balloons and Airships

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781089917694

Page: 110

View: 242

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading The Wright Brothers initially underestimated the difficulties involved in flying, and they were apparently surprised by the fact that so many others were working on solving the "problem of human flight" already. Decades before their own historic plane would end up in the National Air & Space Museum, Wilbur and Orville asked the Smithsonian for reading materials and brushed up on everything from the works of their contemporaries to Leonardo Da Vinci. Undeterred by the work, and the fact that several would-be pioneers died in crashes trying to control gliders, the Wright Brothers tested out gliding at Kitty Hawk in North Carolina for several years, working to perfect pilot control before trying powered flight. In December 1903, the brothers had done enough scientific work with concepts like lift to help their aeronautical designs, and they had the technical know-how to work with engines. On December 17, the brothers took turns making history's first successful powered flights. The fourth and final flight lasted nearly a minute and covered nearly 900 feet. The Wright Flyer I had just made history, and minutes later it would be permanently damaged after wind gusts tipped it over; it would never fly again. A decade later, aircraft appeared in the skies over the battlefields of World War I, but they did not represent a complete novelty in warfare either, at least not during the early months of World War I. While airplanes had never before appeared above the field of war, other aerial vehicles had already been in use for decades, and balloons had carried soldiers above the landscape for centuries to provide a high observation point superior to most geological features. The French used a balloon for this purpose at the Battle of Fleurus in 1794, and by the American Civil War, military hydrogen balloons saw frequent use, filled from wagons generating hydrogen from iron filings and sulfuric acid. The balloonist Thaddeus Lowe persuaded President Abraham Lincoln to use the airships for observation, communicating troop movements to the ground with a telegraph wire. Lowe himself reported, "A hawk hovering above a chicken yard could not have caused more commotion than did my balloons when they appeared before Yorktown." (Holmes, 2013, 251). The Confederates agreed with this assessment: "At Yorktown, when almost daily ascensions were made, our camp, batteries, field works and all defenses were plain to the vision of the occupants of the balloons. [...] The balloon ascensions excited us more than all the outpost attacks." Indeed, with advances in dirigible technology, many military thinkers and even aeronautical enthusiasts believed that blimps would remain the chief military aerial asset more or less forever. These men thought airplanes would play a secondary role at best, and that they might even prove a uselessly expensive gimmick soon to fade back into obscurity, leaving the majestic bulk of the dirigible as sole master of the skies. While this obviously did not prove true, dirigibles proved popular in a variety of different ways throughout the 20th century, and they continued to be complements even as airplane technologies rapidly advanced. Modern Balloons and Airships: The History and Legacy of Dirigibles during the 20th Century looks at the development of balloons and airships during the 20th century, and the innovative ways they were used. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about modern balloons and airships like never before.

Early Balloons and Airships

Undeterred by the work, and the fact that several would-be pioneers died in crashes trying to control gliders, the Wright Brothers tested out gliding at Kitty Hawk in North Carolina for several years, working to perfect pilot control before ...

Early Balloons and Airships

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781086999891

Page: 84

View: 570

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading The Wright Brothers initially underestimated the difficulties involved in flying, and they were apparently surprised by the fact that so many others were working on solving the "problem of human flight" already. Decades before their own historic plane would end up in the National Air & Space Museum, Wilbur and Orville asked the Smithsonian for reading materials and brushed up on everything from the works of their contemporaries to Leonardo Da Vinci. Undeterred by the work, and the fact that several would-be pioneers died in crashes trying to control gliders, the Wright Brothers tested out gliding at Kitty Hawk in North Carolina for several years, working to perfect pilot control before trying powered flight. In December 1903, the brothers had done enough scientific work with concepts like lift to help their aeronautical designs, and they had the technical know-how to work with engines. On December 17, the brothers took turns making history's first successful powered flights. The fourth and final flight lasted nearly a minute and covered nearly 900 feet. The Wright Flyer I had just made history, and minutes later it would be permanently damaged after wind gusts tipped it over; it would never fly again. A decade later, aircraft appeared in the skies over the battlefields of World War I, but they did not represent a complete novelty in warfare either, at least not during the early months of World War I. While airplanes had never before appeared above the field of war, other aerial vehicles had already been in use for decades, and balloons had carried soldiers above the landscape for centuries to provide a high observation point superior to most geological features. The French used a balloon for this purpose at the Battle of Fleurus in 1794, and by the American Civil War, military hydrogen balloons saw frequent use, filled from wagons generating hydrogen from iron filings and sulfuric acid. The balloonist Thaddeus Lowe persuaded President Abraham Lincoln to use the airships for observation, communicating troop movements to the ground with a telegraph wire. Lowe himself reported, "A hawk hovering above a chicken yard could not have caused more commotion than did my balloons when they appeared before Yorktown." (Holmes, 2013, 251). The Confederates agreed with this assessment: "At Yorktown, when almost daily ascensions were made, our camp, batteries, field works and all defenses were plain to the vision of the occupants of the balloons. [...] The balloon ascensions excited us more than all the outpost attacks." Indeed, with advances in dirigible technology, many military thinkers and even aeronautical enthusiasts believed that blimps would remain the chief military aerial asset more or less forever. These men thought airplanes would play a secondary role at best, and that they might even prove a uselessly expensive gimmick soon to fade back into obscurity, leaving the majestic bulk of the dirigible as sole master of the skies. Early Balloons and Airships: The History of the City's Underground Ossuaries and Burial Network looks at the development of the first balloons and airships, and how they were primarily used. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about the first airships like never before.

Proceedings of the Interagency Workshop on Lighter Than Air Vehicles

... 1928 Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War , Talbot , Philadelphia , 1915 Aloft in
the Shenandoah , Theis , New York , 1926 Air Facts and Problems , Thompson ,
New York , 1927 Airship Attacks on England , Truesch , London , 1919
Motorballon ...

Proceedings of the Interagency Workshop on Lighter Than Air Vehicles

Author: Joseph F. Vittek

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 692

View: 454

Preface: in the past few years there has been much discussion both In the United States and abroad of the ability of Lighter Than Air vehicles to meet future transportation needs. Many of the proposed uses and missions seem promising. However, Lighter Than Air Is not without Its problems. Although modern technology may be able to overcome these problems, the ultimate Issue could be the economic feasibility of Lighter Than Air.

Famous Dirigibles

Undeterred by the work, and the fact that several would-be pioneers died in crashes trying to control gliders, the Wright Brothers tested out gliding at Kitty Hawk in North Carolina for several years, working to perfect pilot control before ...

Famous Dirigibles

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781089927938

Page: 94

View: 270

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading The Wright Brothers initially underestimated the difficulties involved in flying, and they were apparently surprised by the fact that so many others were working on solving the "problem of human flight" already. Decades before their own historic plane would end up in the National Air & Space Museum, Wilbur and Orville asked the Smithsonian for reading materials and brushed up on everything from the works of their contemporaries to Leonardo Da Vinci. Undeterred by the work, and the fact that several would-be pioneers died in crashes trying to control gliders, the Wright Brothers tested out gliding at Kitty Hawk in North Carolina for several years, working to perfect pilot control before trying powered flight. In December 1903, the brothers had done enough scientific work with concepts like lift to help their aeronautical designs, and they had the technical know-how to work with engines. On December 17, the brothers took turns making history's first successful powered flights. The fourth and final flight lasted nearly a minute and covered nearly 900 feet. The Wright Flyer I had just made history, and minutes later it would be permanently damaged after wind gusts tipped it over; it would never fly again. A decade later, aircraft appeared in the skies over the battlefields of World War I, but they did not represent a complete novelty in warfare either, at least not during the early months of World War I. While airplanes had never before appeared above the field of war, other aerial vehicles had already been in use for decades, and balloons had carried soldiers above the landscape for centuries to provide a high observation point superior to most geological features. The French used a balloon for this purpose at the Battle of Fleurus in 1794, and by the American Civil War, military hydrogen balloons saw frequent use, filled from wagons generating hydrogen from iron filings and sulfuric acid. The balloonist Thaddeus Lowe persuaded President Abraham Lincoln to use the airships for observation, communicating troop movements to the ground with a telegraph wire. Lowe himself reported, "A hawk hovering above a chicken yard could not have caused more commotion than did my balloons when they appeared before Yorktown." (Holmes, 2013, 251). The Confederates agreed with this assessment: "At Yorktown, when almost daily ascensions were made, our camp, batteries, field works and all defenses were plain to the vision of the occupants of the balloons. [...] The balloon ascensions excited us more than all the outpost attacks." Indeed, with advances in dirigible technology, many military thinkers and even aeronautical enthusiasts believed that blimps would remain the chief military aerial asset more or less forever. These men thought airplanes would play a secondary role at best, and that they might even prove a uselessly expensive gimmick soon to fade back into obscurity, leaving the majestic bulk of the dirigible as sole master of the skies. While this obviously did not prove true, dirigibles proved popular in a variety of different ways throughout the 20th century, and they continued to be complements even as airplane technologies rapidly advanced. Famous Dirigibles: The History and Legacy of Lighter than Air Vehicles from the Renaissance to Today looks at the development of the balloons and airships, and how they were primarily used. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about dirigibles like never before.

Empires of the Sky

The Golden Age of Aviation is brought to life in this story of the giant Zeppelin airships that once roamed the sky—a story that ended with the fiery destruction of the Hindenburg. “Genius . . . a definitive tale of an incredible time ...

Empires of the Sky

Author: Alexander Rose

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0812989996

Page: 624

View: 620

The Golden Age of Aviation is brought to life in this story of the giant Zeppelin airships that once roamed the sky—a story that ended with the fiery destruction of the Hindenburg. “[An] exhilarating history of the dawn of modern air travel.”—Publishers Weekly At the dawn of the twentieth century, when human flight was still considered an impossibility, Germany’s Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin vied with the Wright Brothers to build the world’s first successful flying machine. As the Wrights labored to invent the airplane, Zeppelin fathered the remarkable airship, sparking a bitter rivalry between the two types of aircraft and their innovators that would last for decades, in the quest to control one of humanity’s most inspiring achievements. And it was the airship—not the airplane—that led the way. In the glittery 1920s, the count’s brilliant protégé, Hugo Eckener, achieved undreamed-of feats of daring and skill, including the extraordinary Round-the-World voyage of the Graf Zeppelin. At a time when America’s airplanes—rickety deathtraps held together by glue, screws, and luck—could barely make it from New York to Washington, D.C., Eckener’s airships serenely traversed oceans without a single crash, fatality, or injury. What Charles Lindbergh almost died doing—crossing the Atlantic in 1927—Eckener had effortlessly accomplished three years before the Spirit of St. Louis even took off. Even as the Nazis sought to exploit Zeppelins for their own nefarious purposes, Eckener built his masterwork, the behemoth Hindenburg—a marvel of design and engineering. Determined to forge an airline empire under the new flagship, Eckener met his match in Juan Trippe, the ruthlessly ambitious king of Pan American Airways, who believed his fleet of next-generation planes would vanquish Eckener’s coming airship armada. It was a fight only one man—and one technology—could win. Countering each other’s moves on the global chessboard, each seeking to wrest the advantage from his rival, the struggle for mastery of the air was a clash not only of technologies but of business, diplomacy, politics, personalities, and the two men’s vastly different dreams of the future. Empires of the Sky is the sweeping, untold tale of the duel that transfixed the world and helped create our modern age.