A History of the Connecticut River

Author Wick Griswold takes readers on a provocative journey as he traces the history of the Connecticut River.

A History of the Connecticut River

Author: Wick Griswold

Publisher: History Press (SC)

ISBN: 9781609494056

Page: 125

View: 656

Paddle from Enfield Rapids to Long Island Sound and travel down one of America's most famous waterways, the Connecticut River. Its calm waters conceal an unruly past, where native tribes lost ground to Dutch and English colonists who vied for the river's immense economic power. The skyline of Hartford looms on the western shore, with the gold dome of the capitol as a remnant of this robust economy centered on world trade. Many have found a deep inspiration along the river, including Lady Fenwick, a local legend; David Bushnell, creator of the first American submarine; and even Albert Einstein, who contemplated the cosmos while relaxing on the riverbanks. Author Wick Griswold takes readers on a provocative journey as he traces the history of the Connecticut River.

The Connecticut River

Centuries have flowed by since the first colonists settled on the banks of the Connecticut River. In this vivid narrative, Edmund Delaney recalls years of boom and bust, turmoil and tranquility, and remarkable breakthroughs.

The Connecticut River

Author: Edmund Delaney

Publisher: Globe Pequot Vintage

ISBN: 9781493013487

Page: 186

View: 603

Centuries have flowed by since the first colonists settled on the banks of the Connecticut River. In this vivid narrative, Edmund Delaney recalls years of boom and bust, turmoil and tranquility, and remarkable breakthroughs. All who know and love the Connecticut River, and who celebrate its renewal after years of neglect and pollution, will appreciate this affectionate tribute to the “Nile of New England.”

Griswold Point

At the mouth of the Connecticut River, Griswold Point boasts a rich history filled with remarkable individuals.

Griswold Point

Author: Wick Griswold

Publisher: History Press

ISBN: 9781626195714

Page: 144

View: 887

At the mouth of the Connecticut River, Griswold Point boasts a rich history filled with remarkable individuals. In 1640, Colonel George Fenwick granted the land to Matthew Griswold I, who then turned a teeming wilderness into productive farming and fishing territory. Over the centuries, many prominent Americans called Old Lyme and the Point home. Nathaniel Lynde Griswold and George Griswold built ships that served as privateers in the War of 1812. Florence Griswold invited boarders into her grand house in 1899 and transformed her home into a vibrant artists' colony for the American Impressionist movement. Local author Wick Griswold introduces the community's colorful characters who left indelible marks on history, from colonial governors and judges to adventurers and sea captains.

Connecticut River Shipbuilding

The Essex area was also home to dedicated craftsmen who produced some of the finest yachts ever built. Noted historians Wick Griswold and Ruth Major detail one village's important role in American maritime history.

Connecticut River Shipbuilding

Author: Wick Griswold

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439670498

Page: 208

View: 176

Shipbuilding and shipping have always been key elements in the life of Essex. Since the seventeenth century, the men and women of the lower Connecticut River Valley sustained maritime traditions that spanned the globe in splendid wooden sailing vessels. Their accomplishments include building the first warship of the Connecticut navy and the world's first submarine. They also served as packet ship captains, navigators and skilled crew members who crossed the Atlantic. The Essex area was also home to dedicated craftsmen who produced some of the finest yachts ever built. Noted historians Wick Griswold and Ruth Major detail one village's important role in American maritime history.

Connecticut River Ferries

This is a the tale of America's oldest continually running ferry service and incldues stories of the people who passed through its doors.

Connecticut River Ferries

Author: Wick Griswold & Stephen Jones

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 146713807X

Page: 160

View: 401

America's oldest continuously operating ferry service began running between Rocky Hill and Glastonbury in 1655. More than one hundred have operated on the river since the seventeenth century. The stories of the captains, crews and passengers define the history and personality of the region. Learn how Captain Ham Sandwich got his name. Discover the bond between Katharine Hepburn and a real ferry queen, Cathey LaBonte. Authors Wick Griswold and Stephen Jones detail the history of these charming anachronisms and why they are still afloat today.

A History of the Town of Murrayfield

From this point the main river is called Westfield river until it reaches the meadow
lands of West Springfield and there it is called Agawam river . The writer of the
sketch of Chester , in a book called the “ History of the Connecticut Valley ...

A History of the Town of Murrayfield

Author: Alfred Minott Copeland

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 175

View: 387

The name of the town of Murrayfield changed to Chester on February 21, 1783.

Where the Great River Rises

A lavishly illustrated, comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of the natural and human elements that comprise the Upper Connecticut River watershed

Where the Great River Rises

Author: Rebecca A. Brown

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781584657651

Page: 263

View: 777

A lavishly illustrated, comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of the natural and human elements that comprise the Upper Connecticut River watershed

Connecticut River Valley Flood of 1936

Much of that system now remains in place but has gone largely unmaintained. Author Josh Shanley recounts the greatest flood in New England history and examines the potential for future floods.

Connecticut River Valley Flood of 1936

Author: Joshua Shanley

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1467145777

Page: 128

View: 261

In the beginning of the twentieth century, the Connecticut River Valley was a thriving manufacturing hub for fabric, arms and brass. But early in the spring of 1936, nearly two feet of rain created havoc on a massive scale, killing more than one hundred people and leaving tens of thousands homeless, unemployed and without power for weeks. Patrols were conducted in rowboats on city streets. Typhoid and other public health issues complicated recovery efforts. Adjusted for today's standard, damage estimates exceeded $9 billion, and the flood helped launch FDR's Flood Control Act of 1936. Dams, reservoirs and dikes were constructed to control future flooding. Much of that system now remains in place but has gone largely unmaintained. Author Josh Shanley recounts the greatest flood in New England history and examines the potential for future floods.

The Connecticut River Ecological Study

Personnel and acknowledgements; Hydrography; Oxygen balance in the condenser-cooling water system of the connecticut yankee plant; Benthic fauna; 1965-1967 versus 1968-1972; Entrainment of zooplankton at the connecticut yankee plant; Fishes ...

The Connecticut River Ecological Study

Author: Daniel Merriman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 252

View: 799

Personnel and acknowledgements; Hydrography; Oxygen balance in the condenser-cooling water system of the connecticut yankee plant; Benthic fauna; 1965-1967 versus 1968-1972; Entrainment of zooplankton at the connecticut yankee plant; Fishes of the lower connecticut river and the effects of the connecticut yankee plant; Planktonic fish eggs and larvae of the lower connecticut river and the effects of the connecticut yankee plant including entrainment; Early life history studies on American Shad in the lower connecticut river and the effects of the connecticut yankee plant; The American Shad (Alosa sapidissima), with special reference to its migration and population dynamics in the connecticut river; Recurrent mass mortalities of the blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis, in the lower connecticut river.

The Geography and History of Vermont

In Hartford its waters unite with those of the Connecticut . The length is from fifty to
sixty miles . From Bethel to its mouth it is from ten to fifteen rods wide .
Ompompanoosuc river rises in Vershire , runs easterly into West Fairlee , and ,
passing ...

The Geography and History of Vermont

Author: Samuel Read Hall

Publisher:

ISBN:

Page: 280

View: 917